What to Do When You Worry Too Much: A Kid's Guide to Overcoming Anxiety

What to Do When You Worry Too Much: A Kid's Guide to Overcoming Anxiety

3.9 21
by Dawn Huebner, Bonnie & Ellen Candace
     
 

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What to Do When You Worry Too Much is an interactive self-help book designed to guide 6-12 year olds and their parents through the techniques most often used in the treatment of generalized anxiety. Metaphors and humorous illustrations make difficult concepts easy to understand, while prompts to draw and write help children to master new skills related to…  See more details below

Overview

What to Do When You Worry Too Much is an interactive self-help book designed to guide 6-12 year olds and their parents through the techniques most often used in the treatment of generalized anxiety. Metaphors and humorous illustrations make difficult concepts easy to understand, while prompts to draw and write help children to master new skills related to reducing anxiety. Engaging, encouraging, and easy to follow, this book educates, motivates, and empowers children to work towards change. Includes a note to parents by psychologist and author Dawn Huebner, Ph.D.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Meredith Kiger
This interesting workbook is one of two "What to Do" guides to help children recognize feelings of anxiety and practice new ways of handling their worries. Designed to be used with an adult—a parent, preferably—it begins by explaining to adults that worry is a pattern of behavior that can be changed through practice and that they can help facilitate that change by helping their child identify ways of coping with stress. The book's 12 short chapters are interactive and progress from defining worry and anxious behavior to recognizing it in oneself to offering alternatives. Illustrated with cartoon-like drawings, the book offers plenty of exercises to engage the child and uses an understanding tone that is all positive reinforcement. The suggestions and exercises are ones that can be revisited as needed. For more serious issues, the author suggests that the book be used in conjunction with professional counseling. Reviewer: Meredith Kiger, Ph.D.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781591473145
Publisher:
American Psychological Association
Publication date:
09/28/2005
Series:
What to Do Guides for Kids Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
80
Sales rank:
16,277
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
6 - 12 Years

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What to Do When You Worry Too Much : A Kid's Guide to Overcoming Anxiety 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is hard to find resources for a nervous kid, especially one that is written for a kid to read. My 9 year old reads the book on his own and takes the suggestions and puts them into action. He also finds parts funny, which is great. I get the book out when he tells me he's feeling nervous about something. It doesn't put him down for feeling that way, but helps him to see that he is normal and that he can have power over his feelings in very positive ways.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just received my copy of this book and had to write a review. This is an excellent resource for counselors, who work with anxious kids, or for parents, who have anxious kids. It is well-written for kids, ages 6-12, with good examples and illustrations. It also allows for kids to 'work-through' some of their worries by drawing and practicing techniques.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I picked up this book because who can resist the title, and because my daughter benefited from the first book in Dawn Huebner¿s series. This one went to my son who, as the author describes, is happy as long as things are going his way, but falls apart when problems arise. We have worked the book together, and are practicing the strategies, especially those involving jumping hurdles and thinking more flexibly. I am impressed by how child-friendly the book is. My son actually looked forward to reading it, and now takes pride in turning his thoughts around. I appreciated the explanation to parents, and the clear instructions about what all of us can do to not be so stymied by problems. There is definitely less grumbling in our house these days.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As any mental health provider will tell you, Anxiety disorders are one of the most frequent problems children face. Trying to help a frightened child talk about and address their fears is often very difficult. Children fear that even talking about the problem will make it worse. Dawn Huebner's book provides the solution. In developmentally appropriate and engaging scenairos, Dr. Huebner puts the problem in perspective and provides interventions and activities which are fun! The book provides a child friendly means of understanding how anxiety disorders can grow and affect a child's life. She than presents cognitive and behavioral skills in a manner in which the child can understand and practice. There are even workbook style formats for documenting progress and skills achieved! All of this is presented in a gradual, friendly manner which is invaluable for the anxious child. This book is a must have for mental health professionals, teachers, guidance counselors and parents of anxious children.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A truly child-friendly (and parent-friendly) book that goes well beyond anything I have seen on the market. This book immediately engaged my daughter, helping her learn about her anxiety and, even more importantly, what to do about it. Using language, metaphors, and humor that elementary school age kids can easily relate to, this book teaches a set of specific skills to reduce unproductive worrying. And it actually worked! A unique book. I'm glad I found it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This informative and clear workbook for elementary school age children, written by Dr. Huebner, has been very helpful for my children. My 7 y.o. states, 'This book is great! Now when I worry I know what to do!'
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is wonderful! It is really geared towards kids and explains things with illustrations and stories they can relate too. My son actually enjoys our time reading this together, and asks if we can read it again. It has really helped him with his worries.
reading_two More than 1 year ago
This book makes addressing anxiety, worry or concern accessible to kids. My child could think of worst case scenarios for just about everything. The book did two very important things for my child. First, it helped him understand that he was not the only child like that and he got this from his father. Second, it gave him a mechanism to address the concern and fear on his own. I highly recommend it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The activities in this book are great to kid gets thinking and working on reducing their anxiety!
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lmswSB More than 1 year ago
It appears this book is geared towards older children who have good reading skills, but could be related worrying too much. There appears to be too much wording expecially when working with children who do not like to read or have poor attention span. With a little creativity the book can be modifiend to assist younger children with identifying and recognizing worries that can build. There are tools within the book that are helpful such as setting a time of day to worry and creating a worry box which can be helfpul in getting rid of worries. Since some children may have never grown plants before it could be a useful tool to encourage parents to work together in an activity. Its concept of the tomatoe plant in conjuction allows children to identify if worries are not kept in check they can grow larger and larger.