What to Expect When You're Expecting Hatchlings: A Guide for Crocodilian Parents (and Curious Kids)

What to Expect When You're Expecting Hatchlings: A Guide for Crocodilian Parents (and Curious Kids)

by Bridget Heos, Stéphane Jorisch
     
 

Congratulations, crocodilian parents-to-be! You have little ones on the way. They're called hatchlings. Read this book to find out where to lay your eggs, how you'll know when the babies are ready to hatch, and what you and your babies will do all day long. Whether you're an alligator, caiman, crocodile, or even a funny-looking gharial, you'll find answers to all

Overview

Congratulations, crocodilian parents-to-be! You have little ones on the way. They're called hatchlings. Read this book to find out where to lay your eggs, how you'll know when the babies are ready to hatch, and what you and your babies will do all day long. Whether you're an alligator, caiman, crocodile, or even a funny-looking gharial, you'll find answers to all your parenting questions here. But there's one condition: don't eat the book!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - JoAn Watson Martin
In case crocodilian parents-to-be are a bit insecure when expecting, many of their questions are answered. Their instincts will also serve the parents well. The illustrations show Mama and Papa crocodile holding hands, kissing, innocent of what lies ahead. The clever title is a take-off on the best seller of a few years ago, "What to Expect When You're Expecting." Most expecting mothers receive several copies. The baby crocs will be tiny and helpless. To raccoons, the hatchlings are fun-sized snacks. Lay the eggs in a place where fresh water and sea water mix. The temperature will determine whether a baby crocodile is a boy or girl. Mama Crocodile will transport the babies in her mouth, ten at a time. They will go hunting with Mama at night (nocturnal), but snails and insects are a better diet for them at this time than wildcats, oxen or otters. Bridget Heos has written a unique factual/fictional story. Rather than simply offering dry facts, she compares the crocodilians with the human family. The illustrations are laugh-out-loud, charming crocodile pictures. A further reading list of books, websites and a glossary indicate valuable classroom information. Answers are available to all questions. One condition: "Don't eat the book." Reviewer: JoAn Watson Martin
Kirkus Reviews
This lighthearted introduction to the group of reptiles that includes alligators, crocodiles, caimans and gharials presents itself as an instruction book for prospective crocodilian parents. Third in the Expecting Animal Babies series, this resembles previous titles covering insect and marsupial development. The focus on the lives of animal children makes an immediate connection to readers who are children themselves. Using a question-and-answer format, Heos addresses readers directly in a cheerful second-person narration. She introduces the order, describes where the various families live and lay and guard their eggs, shows fetal development and hatching, then looks at babies' early lives. She chooses details that will intrigue: a mother carrying her hatchlings down to the water in her mouth, caiman foster moms and, of course, how big they will get. With watercolor, gouache and pen and ink, Jorisch creates humorously personified creatures: a white-coated crocodile doctor, a gharial mom knitting on the beach as she watches her children slide into the water, a caiman family with backpacks and suitcases trudging off to a wetter swamp. Accurate facts, nicely numbered pages, a glossary, and a substantial list of further reading and websites make this toothsome treat useful for reports as well as entertainment. Both engaging and informative, this is a welcome addition to a kid-pleasing series. (Informational picture book. 6-11)
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3—Heos's humorous, chatty introduction to what crocodilian parents do to protect their eggs and hatchlings until the offspring are able to take on their own predatory role is evenly orchestrated through Jorisch's hilarious line drawing and watercolors. The family encompasses alligators, crocodiles, caimans, and gharials, and the differences among these reptiles are explicated. Interesting facts about their diet, habitat, physical development, and behavior will entertain and inform young readers. The information is delivered to the crocodilian parents in a Q & A format: amid heavy personification, there is a good deal of material suitable for use in reports. A well-written glossary and a well-selected further reading list enhance the learning experience.—Nancy Call, formerly at Santa Cruz Public Libraries, Aptos, CA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761358602
Publisher:
Lerner Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/01/2012
Series:
Expecting Animal Babies Series
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.70(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
620L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author

Bridget Heos is the author of 13 young adult nonfiction books. Her first picture book, What to Expect When You're Expecting Larvae: A Guide for Insect Parents (and Curious Children), comes out in March of 2011. It is illustrated by Stéphane Jorisch. Bridget lives in Kansas City with her husband and three sons. Stéphane Jorisch is an illustrator, whose imaginative work has won many awards, including the prestigious Governor General's Award for Children's Illustration in Canada. His works are produced in watercolor, gouache, and also pen and ink, following in the footsteps of his father who illustrated comic strips for newspapers in Europe. In addition to his books for young people, Stéphane also illustrates for magazines and has created designs for the renowned Cirque de Soleil. Stéphane was born in Brussels and grew up in Lachine, Québec. He now lives in Montreal with his girlfriend and their three children.

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