What to Expect When You're Expecting Joeys: A Guide for Marsupial Parents (and Curious Kids)

What to Expect When You're Expecting Joeys: A Guide for Marsupial Parents (and Curious Kids)

by Bridget Heos, Stéphane Jorisch
     
 

Congratulations, marsupial parents-to-be! You're about to meet your tiny bundles of joy. They're called joeys. Some are as small as a grain of rice when they're born! Read this book to find out how many babies to expect, how to help them find your pouch, and what those little joeys will do in there all day long. Whether you're a possum or an opossum, a kangaroo or

Overview

Congratulations, marsupial parents-to-be! You're about to meet your tiny bundles of joy. They're called joeys. Some are as small as a grain of rice when they're born! Read this book to find out how many babies to expect, how to help them find your pouch, and what those little joeys will do in there all day long. Whether you're a possum or an opossum, a kangaroo or a wallaby, a koala or even a shrieking Tasmanian devil, you'll find answers to all your parenting questions here.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Cathi I. White
Animals having babies is not unusual. Most animals carry their babies for several weeks or maybe a few months, but marsupials are different. A southern brown bandicoot only carries its babies for 12 days. Marsupials also have the tiniest babies in the world! Some are very tiny, as small as a grain of rice, like the Virginia opossum. Twenty baby opossums can fit in a teaspoon! Some marsupials have pouches, such as kangaroos, wallabies, koalas, and wombats. They have only one baby they carry for months. Red kangaroos have the biggest marsupial baby; it is the size of a jelly bean when born. But then the baby grows inside the mother's pouch where he drinks milk consistently. When a mother's pouch has several babies, they will stay there for a couple of months. If there is only one baby, it may stay for five months, like the red kangaroo. When the joey comes out, it is considered the joey's second birth. These fascinating facts, as well as others, are specified in this unique book where it is written in question and answer form. The author gives many details about marsupial babies and what happens to them inside and outside their mother's pouch. Children of all ages will be thrilled as they read the intriguing information. The illustrations are vivid and show the playfulness of the marsupial, giving insight to their world. There is a section in the back of the book for further reading and websites. In addition, the reader can download free educational resources by using the publisher's website. The author's distinctive way of writing makes the book fun, delightful, and captivating for the reader. This enlightening book would be a great resource for any elementary classroom. Reviewer: Cathi I. White
School Library Journal
Gr 1�3—If marsupial mamas-to-be were literate, they'd appreciate this guide to the birth and care of their joeys, called "pinkies" when they're first born. Though the author has written the book as if she were talking to them, the real intended audience is children, who will delight in the humor contained in the text as well as in the colorful illustrations of animals with animated facial expressions. Presented in a question-and-answer format, the book addresses such questions as, "What if I don't have a pouch? Help! I've looked everywhere!" or, "Should I make the pouch with paper or cloth?" Each question is answered with a blend of humor and factual information, and children will be able to discern, then empathize with, the mother's concern about her offspring. Heos explains vocabulary terms specific to marsupials, such as "cloaca," "joey," and "mob," and includes a glossary that defines these and other terms associated with marsupials. Teachers using this book have the opportunity to explain what anthropomorphism means and show how it applies to the critters in this book, then distinguish between which aspects of it are true to a marsupial's nature and which ones are human attributes.—Maggie Chase, Boise State University, ID
Kirkus Reviews

Directed at marsupial parents of all kinds, from kangaroos and koalas to possums and bandicoots, this tongue-in-cheek guide to joey development takes it step by step, from the birth of your pinkie to where your baby goes after it leaves the pouch.

Never once dropping the pretense that this is written for pouched mammals, this manages to be both entertaining and informative, defining marsupial and covering gestation periods, size and number of young, the pinkie's trip from cloaca to pouch or pouch substitute, feeding and further development. Heos' question-and-answer text also weaves in information about where animals live and what they eat, but informally—just enough to whet curiosity and to send readers to the solid suggestions for further reading and websites. She uses appropriate vocabulary, making meanings clear in context and also providing a glossary. Jorisch's painted pen-and-ink sketches show lively, lightly anthropomorphized animals and add considerably to the humor. How can readers resist the wombat checking out her pouch or the honey-possum love fest? Both parents and offspring have personality.

This companion to What to Expect When You're Expecting Larvae (2011) is enormously appealing, an offbeat approach to learning about the natural world that targets exactly the stage young readers most want to know about. (glossary, selected bibliography) (Informational picture book. 6-11)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761358596
Publisher:
Lerner Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/01/2011
Series:
Expecting Animal Babies Series
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,107,860
Product dimensions:
10.88(w) x 9.23(h) x 0.31(d)
Lexile:
660L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author

Bridget Heos is the author of 13 young adult nonfiction books. Her first picture book, What to Expect When You're Expecting Larvae: A Guide for Insect Parents (and Curious Children), comes out in March of 2011. It is illustrated by Stéphane Jorisch. Bridget lives in Kansas City with her husband and three sons.

Stéphane Jorisch is an illustrator, whose imaginative work has won many awards, including the prestigious Governor General's Award for Children's Illustration in Canada. His works are produced in watercolor, gouache, and also pen and ink, following in the footsteps of his father who illustrated comic strips for newspapers in Europe. In addition to his books for young people, Stéphane also illustrates for magazines and has created designs for the renowned Cirque de Soleil. Stéphane was born in Brussels and grew up in Lachine, Québec. He now lives in Montreal with his girlfriend and their three children.

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