What Type of Leader Are You?: Using the Enneagram System to Identify and Grow Your Leadership Strenghts and Achieve Maximum Succes [NOOK Book]

Overview

Every leader has a number!



Millions of people around the world use the nine-point Enneagram system to analyze their personality strengths. Now for the first time, renowned Enneagram expert Ginger Lapid-Bogda shows how to use this personality typing system to reach your ...

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What Type of Leader Are You?: Using the Enneagram System to Identify and Grow Your Leadership Strenghts and Achieve Maximum Succes

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Overview

Every leader has a number!



Millions of people around the world use the nine-point Enneagram system to analyze their personality strengths. Now for the first time, renowned Enneagram expert Ginger Lapid-Bogda shows how to use this personality typing system to reach your full potential as a leader and to pinpoint your core leadership style.



“A unique combination of business savvy, organization development, and in-depth self-development perspectives.”-Colleen Gentry, senior vice president for Executive Development, Wachovia Corporation



“Chock-full of excellent suggestions and astute examples that . . . provide readers with a multitude of teachable moments.”-Beverly Kaye, Ph.D., founder/CEO of Career Systems International and coauthor of Love 'Em or Lose 'Em: Getting Good People to Stay



“Dr. Lapid-Bogda adroitly describes how different types of people fulfill the core competencies of leadership in their own ways.”-Helen Palmer, author of The Enneagram and The Enneagram in Love and Work



“We recommend this book for anyone in leadership wishing to use the superbly insightful tool of the Enneagram to access their innate gifts, identify their biases, and become truly great leaders.”-Don Richard Riso and Russ Hudson, The Enneagram Institute, authors of Personality Types and The Wisdom of the Enneagram

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780071509435
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education
  • Publication date: 5/14/2007
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 1,084,701
  • File size: 8 MB

Meet the Author

Ginger Lapid-Bogda, Ph.D. is the head of Bogda & Associates, an international Enneagram consulting firm, and is past president of the International Enneagram Association.

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Read an Excerpt

WHAT TYPE OF LEADER ARE YOU?

USING THE ENNEAGRAM SYSTEM TO IDENTIFY AND GROW YOUR LEADERSHIP STRENGTHS AND ACHIEVE MAXIMUM SUCCESS


By GINGER LAPID-BOGDA

The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Copyright © 2007 Ginger Lapid-Bogda
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-07-150943-5


Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

What Type Are You?


The Enneagram, which dates from at least 2,000 years ago and has its roots in Asia and the Middle East, derives its name from the Greek words ennea ("nine") and gram ("something written or drawn"). The term refers to the nine points, or numbers, of the Enneagram system seen in the Enneagram symbol (Figure 1.1). This ancient system offers profound insights into the different ways in which people think, feel, and behave, since the nine different Enneagram styles represent distinct worldviews, with related patterns of thinking, feeling, and taking action. Even more important, each Enneagram style is connected to a specific high-impact development path. Thus, the accurate identification of your Enneagram style is important if you want to grow and develop as a leader and as a person.

Although each of us has only one position or number on the Enneagram and our style remains the same throughout our lifetime, our Enneagram style–based characteristics may soften or become more pro-nounced as we grow and develop. In addition, there are four other Enneagram styles that may also contribute traits to our personality. These fouradditional Enneagram styles, explained later in this chapter, do not change our core style; they merely add to our complexity as a person and can provide us with useful development opportunities.


How to Determine Your Enneagram Style

Although there are several helpful Enneagram tests currently available, none of them will determine your Enneagram style with absolute certainty. Ultimately, you must rely on your own self-assessment to identify your Enneagram style. While you know yourself best, including what motivates you and drives your actions, you may be so used to thinking, feeling, or behaving in certain ways that you may not even notice some of your customary patterns. As a result, the process of determining your Enneagram style can take you on a self-reflective journey that can be invaluable to your growth as a leader. Having to identify your Enneagram style yourself will not only help you in learning the Enneagram system, but also help you become more introspective and objective about yourself.

In this chapter, you will first gain information about each Ennea-gram style that includes the following:

• A graphic image and style description

• The core focus associated with the style

• The common labels used for the style

• The style's four basic issues

• Leadership paradigms for each style, along with related strengths and areas for development

• Questions to ask yourself to assess whether this is your style


After you understand the nine Enneagram styles in more depth and begin to identify your Enneagram style, additional information about the Enneagram system will be provided.


The Nine Enneagram Styles

As you read through the nine Enneagram style descriptions that follow, keep this question in the back of your mind: Which of the Enneagram styles most accurately describes me?


Basic Issues for Ones

PERFECTIONISM Ones continuously compare what is to what should be. They appreciate something that is exceptionally well done—for example, a play, a symphony, a book, a project, or anything else that exemplifies quality to them. Ones hold both themselves and others accountable for acting responsibly and for measuring up to their high standards.

A RIGHT WAY Ones believe that every problem has a correct solution; they are quick to react to a situation by offering what they believe is the right approach or the right answer. Even when Ones do understand that the correct answer is rarely black and white, they will still assert that there is one "right" way by saying, "Nothing is ever black and white. It is almost always gray."

RESENTMENT Because being responsible is an overarching value for Ones, they usually approach their work with diligence, demon-strating qualities such as follow-through, timeliness, and attention to detail. When others do not display these same characteristics, Ones often feel resentful and think, Why do I work so hard, when others seem to get away with a less than stellar performance? Resentment can build up in Ones, and they tend to express it through flares of anger that often take others by surprise. Most Ones need to feel righteous or justified in their outrage in order to express the deep-seated anger that frequently lies below the surface.

JUDGMENT AND SELF-IMPROVEMENT Ones have a highly active inner critic that can be relentless, telling them what they have done wrong, what they should have said, and how they ought to have behaved. The self-recriminating inner voice, which is usually "on" 85 percent or more of the time, has a purpose: to keep Ones from making mistakes. This internal judge also assesses what has gone well and what can be done for self-improvement.

Ones also tend to be judgmental of others, expressing this through explicit verbal criticism and body language. Even Ones who do not appear to be critical may, in fact, simply be keeping their thoughts to themselves. For example, when a One was asked why she did not seem to be overtly critical of others, she responded, "Oh, but you should hear what's going on inside my head!" The One's judgment of others may also be positive—for example, Ones can be thrilled when they observe excellence in someone's thinking process, behavior, or work product.


Ones: Leadership Paradigm and Related Characteristics

PARADIGM: A leader's job is to set clear goals and inspire others to achieve the highest quality.

Place a check next to the leadership characteristics that describe you well.


QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF TO DETERMINE

WHETHER YOU MIGHT BE AN ENNEAGRAM STYLE ONE

1. Do I have a voice or message in my head, like a tape recorder, that continually judges me and other people in terms of what has been done wrong, what has been done well, and what needs to be improved?

2. Do the four basic issues—perfectionism, a right way, resentment, and judgment and self-improvement—apply to me?

3. Does the Style One leadership paradigm fit my view of leadership?

4. Did I check 10 or more items in "Areas of Strength" and "Areas for Development"?


Basic Issues for Twos

RELATIONSHIP ORIENTATION Most Twos believe that personal relationships are the most important part of their lives. It is quite common for Twos to have many close friendships, with the Twos providing support, advice, or whatever they believe another person needs. Although Twos often feel that others are dependent on them, they themselves become dependent on their relationships for personal affirmation and a sense of self-worth.

FOCUS ON OTHER PEOPLE Twos usually display an intuitive ability to understand what others need and a willingness to provide what is needed. Their capacity to reach out to other people can be either generalized (for example, anyone who appears in need) or highly selective (specific individuals who the Two believes have high status). In the latter case, Twos will alter their image and behavior to meet the other person's perception of desirability. Generally, Twos instinctively know how to present themselves so that others will like them.

DENIAL OF OWN NEEDS Because Twos focus so intently on others, they often pay little attention to themselves. When asked what they themselves need, most Twos either become confused or say, "I need to be needed." Since they are out of touch with their needs, Twos often have difficulty getting those needs met directly. Instead, they give to others, often unaware that they want something in return.

PRIDE Twos typically take great pride in their self-image as a "good" person and in their ability to know what people need or situations require better than most other people do. Although they may be quite competent at orchestrating situations and managing people (often behind the scenes), there is a downside to this quality: while Twos become quite elated when things go well, they can become deflated and angry when events do not turn out as planned.


Twos: Leadership Paradigm and Related Characteristics

PARADIGM: A leader's job is to assess the strengths and weaknesses of team members and to motivate and facilitate people toward the achievement of organizational goals.

Place a check next to the leadership characteristics that describe you well.


QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF TO DETERMINE

WHETHER YOU MIGHT BE AN ENNEAGRAM STYLE TWO

1. Do I focus on others rather than on myself, and do I intuitively know what someone else needs, but have a hard time articulating my own needs, even to myself?

2. Do the four basic issues—relationship orientation, focus on other people, denial of own needs, and pride—apply to me?

3. Does the Style Two leadership paradigm fit my view of leadership?

4. Did I check 10 or more items in "Areas of Strength" and "Areas for Development"?


Basic Issues for Threes

IMAGE Threes are known as the chameleons of the Enneagram, because they can change their image to match a particular situation. They do this not to blend in or fit in, but rather to create a positive impression—usually one of self- confidence, optimism, and success. This shape shifting is more intuitive than conscious; for instance, a Three might say, "I'm just able to read my audience well."

GOAL ORIENTATION Threes focus on achieving results, which tends to make them highly productive. However, their productivity can come at the expense of their and others' feelings. Threes usually perceive emotions, especially those of sadness or fear, as having the potential to derail their accomplishments, and they can become quite agitated when obstacles appear in their paths.

SUCCESS Because their sense of self-worth depends on their doing a job successfully, Threes tend to focus on "doing" rather than "being." They believe they are valued for what they accomplish rather than for who they are. Ever active, most Threes are likely to respond with confusion if it is suggested that they might spend less time doing and more time simply being. "Being?" they might ask. "What is that?"

FAILURE AVOIDANCE In order to avoid failing, Threes often pursue activities in which they are competent and are therefore likely to be successful. If and when they fail—as everyone does at some point—Threes may still say, "I've never really failed," or they may reframe the failure as a learning experience.


Threes: Leadership Paradigm and Related Characteristics

PARADIGM: A leader's job is to create environments that achieve results because people understand the organization's goals and structure.

Place a check next to the leadership characteristics that describe you well.


QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF TO DETERMINE

WHETHER YOU MIGHT BE AN ENNEAGRAM STYLE THREE

1. Do I do all the things I do so that others will value and respect me?

2. Do the four basic issues—image, goal orientation, success, and failure avoidance—apply to me?

3. Does the Style Three leadership paradigm fit my view of leadership?

4. Did I check 10 or more items in "Areas of Strength" and "Areas for Development"?


Basic Issues for Fours

EXTREMES OF EMOTIONAL LIFE Fours tend to live at the extremes of the emotional spectrum, with depression at one end and hyper-activity at the other. Some may swing between the two. Fours believe that their intensity of experiencing life's highs and lows far surpasses the ordinary happiness for which others settle. Many Fours give the impression that they believe the statement: "I am my feelings."

LONGING Fours idealize that which they believe is beyond their grasp, romanticizing it and/or yearning for it. As a result, the commonplace can seem boring and ordinary by comparison. Most Fours think of melancholy as a positive, or at least not a negative, emotion that makes them feel both in touch with their deepest self and very much alive.

AUTHENTICITY Fours are on a continuous quest for the true, the real, and the authentic. Their primary focus is on the authenticity of their own self- expression (usually through the arts or interper-sonal communication) and the genuine connections they feel with other people. Searching for meaning through emotional expression, Fours tend to express themselves through personal stories and often believe that the world of personal experience and feelings is what is real.

COMPARISONS Blatantly or subtly, consciously or unconsciously, Fours compare themselves to others on a regular basis. As a result of these constant comparisons, Fours conclude that they are defective, superior, or both. When Fours assess that they fall short in comparison to another, they experience envy. Envy refers to the sense that "Others have something that I am missing. Why not me?" as opposed to jealousy, which refers to "They have it, and I want it!"


Fours: Leadership Paradigm and Related Characteristics

PARADIGM: A leader's job is to create organizations that give people meaning and purpose so that they are inspired to do excellent work.

Place a check next to the leadership characteristics that describe you well.


QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF TO DETERMINE

WHETHER YOU MIGHT BE AN ENNEAGRAM STYLE FOUR

1. When I feel something very strongly, do I hold on to my emotions intensely for long periods of time, often replaying my thoughts, feelings, and sensations?

2. Do the four basic issues—extremes of emotional life, longing, authenticity, and comparisons—apply to me?

3. Does the Style Four leadership paradigm fit my view of leadership?

4. Did I check 10 or more items in "Areas of Strength" and "Areas for Development"?


Basic Issues for Fives

THIRST FOR KNOWLEDGE Fact-focused, objective, and analytical, Fives are fascinated by information, especially in their areas of interest. It is not unusual for Fives to have an extensive personal library in a room that is entirely their own. This library, which may contain books, CDs, DVDs, or magazines, is not just a storehouse of knowledge, but a personal retreat—the place where the Five can be alone and free of external demands.

PRIVACY Fives usually crave privacy, as it allows them to recharge and ready themselves for interactions with others. At one extreme, a Five can be a hermit, leading a reclusive life of the mind. On the other hand, a Five can assume public roles, as long as these roles are clear and circumscribed and allow the Five to keep emotions to a minimum. Fives may confide in a trusted few but expect them to zealously protect their confidences.

EMOTIONAL DETACHMENT Fives automatically detach from their emotions and then reexperience their feelings later, when they are alone and feel safe. Fives of ten note that their emotions are more available and accessible to them when no one else is around to observe them, saying that they need this time alone to sort out their feelings and thoughts.

COMPARTMENTALIZATION Fives often separate or compartmentalize the different parts of their lives. They often have different friends for work, recreation, or community service. Fives also compartmentalize knowledge, placing information in separated "slots" or mental categories.


Fives: Leaderhip Paradigm and Related Characteristics

PARADIGM: A leader's job is to develop an effective organization through research, deliberation, and planning so that all systems fit together and people are working on a common mission.

Place a check next to the leadership characteristics that describe you well.


QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF TO DETERMINE

WHETHER YOU MIGHT BE AN ENNEAGRAM STYLE FIVE

1. When a situation gets emotional or intense, do I automatically disconnect from my feelings of the moment and then reconnect with these emotions later at a time and place of my choice?

2. Do the four basic issues—thirst for knowledge, privacy, emotional detachment, and compartmentalization—apply to me?

3. Does the Style Five leadership paradigm fit my view of leadership?

4. Did I check 10 or more items in "Areas of Strength" and "Areas for Development"?


Basic Issues for Sixes

ANTICIPATORY PLANNING AND WORST-CASE SCENARIOS Sixes usually have active and vivid imaginations that continually generate worst-case scenarios. In fact, Sixes can be quite insightful, anticipating and averting potential problems, but they also can miss the mark, projecting their own thoughts and feelings onto others and causing themselves anxiety in the process. Some Sixes—called phobic Sixes—are aware that they tend to create worst-case sce-narios, while other Sixes are counterphobic, engaging in high-risk activities to prove both to themselves and to others that they are not fearful. Most Sixes, however, fall somewhere between these two extremes and may display phobic and counterphobic behavior under different circumstances.

PROCRASTINATION The Six's tendency to worry about what could happen often results in procrastination. It is not that Sixes forget to do something; they simply become uncertain about which alternative is the best course of action. When their anxiety intersects with self-doubt, Sixes can become immobilized by "analysis paralysis."

LOYALTY Sixes value loyalty to the team and the organization, believing that those in authority will recognize and reward them for their dedication and that their peers will support them if something goes awry. The Sixes' focus on loyalty to the group does not mean that all Sixes want to be an integral part of a group, however. Some prefer to stay on the periphery, with the freedom to move in and out of the group setting as they please.
(Continues...)


Excerpted from WHAT TYPE OF LEADER ARE YOU? by GINGER LAPID-BOGDA. Copyright © 2007 by Ginger Lapid-Bogda. Excerpted by permission of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Acknowledgments          

Introduction          

Chapter 1 What type are you?          

Chapter 2 Drive for Result          

Chapter 3 Strive for Self-Mastery          

Chapter 4 Know the Business: Think and Act Strategically          

Chapter 5 Become an Excellent Communicator          

Chapter 6 Lead High-Performing Teams          

Chapter 7 Make Optimal Decisions          

Chapter 8 Take Charge of Change          

Chapter 9 Stretch Your Leadership Paradigms          

Resources          

Index          


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