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What We Remember
     

What We Remember

3.6 15
by Michael Thomas Ford
 

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Every family has a hidden story--even the perfect ones. In this suspenseful and deeply moving novel, Michael Thomas Ford propels us beyond smiling holiday photographs and beloved anecdotes to explore the complex ties within one family--and between two very different brothers whom catastrophe will either unite or divide forever. . .

On the morning James

Overview

Every family has a hidden story--even the perfect ones. In this suspenseful and deeply moving novel, Michael Thomas Ford propels us beyond smiling holiday photographs and beloved anecdotes to explore the complex ties within one family--and between two very different brothers whom catastrophe will either unite or divide forever. . .

On the morning James McCloud, a Seattle district attorney, gets a call from his sister, he senses his own long-buried family history is about to be dragged into the light. James's father, Daniel, a police officer, disappeared eight years ago. Now his body has been found. James always believed his father committed suicide. But the evidence leaves no doubt: Daniel was murdered.


James immediately returns to Cold Falls, New York, to be with the rest of his family. Among them is his brother, Billy, twenty-one, gay, and even more troubled than James remembers. James was always the golden child, Billy the disappointment. Time has not healed their differences, but events may drastically change their roles. For when James's high school ring is discovered with Daniel's body, he becomes the prime suspect. And as the truth emerges, piece by piece, Billy finds himself amid a swirl of secrets and lies powerful enough to decide his brother's fate, threaten yet another life, and destroy the bonds that still remain. . .

"A fast-moving yet thoughtful exploration of family love and the things we do in its name." --Booklist

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Ford's adequate if overbusy latest begins with the body of sheriff Daniel McCloud, who went missing seven years ago, discovered buried in a box in the woods. As the investigation by the current sheriff, Nate Derry, progresses, the McClouds must come to terms with their father having been murdered, while McCloud's son, James, becomes the prime suspect, and a dark web of deception that chokes the Derry and McCloud families threatens to be unearthed. Leaning heavily on flashbacks, the story jumps between its perhaps too many points of view with relative ease. Ford handily navigates the suffocating intimacy of smalltown life, and his wide supporting cast has a few meaty characters. While the big reveal is set up very early on, the sprinkling of smaller mysteries and little tragedies will keep readers going. (June)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780758260185
Publisher:
Kensington
Publication date:
05/01/2010
Sold by:
Penguin Random House Publisher Services
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
368
Sales rank:
831,054
File size:
524 KB

Meet the Author

Michael Thomas Ford is the award-winning author of numerous books, including Last Summer, Looking for It, Full Circle, and Changing Tides.

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What We Remember 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Libra40 More than 1 year ago
Michael Thomas Ford out did himself with this book. I have read all of his books, and this one was very good. You think you knew who did, it but you will be shock when you fine out who did the killing. Its not who you think it is. When I recieved this book, I read it in 2 days. I could not put it down. Michael keeps a vivid picture of the surrounding area of the book. Like your there with all the characters, in this book. You can picture what everyone looks like,feel the love between the characters,and the hate, see the house of the main characters. I like the way he wrote this book, and he may go back to the past and to the now, but you do not get lost. I would recommend this book to anyone who likes a good fiction. Michael has done a wonderful job with all of his books. I hope he will write another book soon.
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MichaelTravisJasper More than 1 year ago
I've read about everything by this author, and always enjoy his work. This is probably his first real mystery, and he kept me guessing right up to the end. In a bit of a surprise move, the gay character is neither the star of the story nor particularly sympathetic. This is a tale of family dynamics and small town living. I appreciated this quick and entertaining read. Michael Travis Jasper, author of the novel, "To Be Chosen"
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KenCady More than 1 year ago
One doesn't read a Michael Thomas Ford novel for the artistry of the words, but more for the juicy human interest gossip, usually along a gay vein. In this novel, the gay character proves to be the biggest mess of them all, although maybe not a murderer. "What We Remember" turns out to be the remembrances of a highly dysfunctional family, and what they remember reaches a point of absurdity as the novel reaches its, um, climax. The story revolves around a murdered man, and one of the main characters, James, a Seattle district attorney, has been arrested for the murder on the basis of his high school ring being found with the body. Really! He is not only put in jail, but charged by the district attorney with murder. There could have been a million reasons why his ring was where it was, but the author would have us believe that this is almost insurmountable proof of his guilt. And for a district attorney, James is pretty much a wimp about it, lying in jail hoping someone will save him. This fault alone makes the novel absurd, especially for anyone who has ever watched a crime show. But Ford does not disappoint with the juicy stuff- rape, sex, both gay and straight, and plenty of betrayal. So if that suits you, I've got a novel for you. Just don't expect plausibility or any hint of reality.