What Will the Weather Be?

What Will the Weather Be?

by Lynda DeWitt, Carolyn Croll
     
 
Meteorologists today know more than ever before. They use weather maps, satelllites, ballons and planes to measure temperature, air presure, wind direction, and speed. But changes outside are not always predictable because our weather depends on the air hundreds of miles away. Sometimes meteorologists telll us to take our umbrellas when we don't need them. Other

Overview

Meteorologists today know more than ever before. They use weather maps, satelllites, ballons and planes to measure temperature, air presure, wind direction, and speed. But changes outside are not always predictable because our weather depends on the air hundreds of miles away. Sometimes meteorologists telll us to take our umbrellas when we don't need them. Other times they say we don't need a jacket when we do. Will it rain? Will it snow? Not even the experts know for sure.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Weathermen sometimes slip up, as they did in March 1999 when a surprise blizzard brought snow to Washington DC, but there are many ways for them to predict storms accurately. The movement of air from one area to another causes a warm or cold weather front. Because they move fast, cold fronts produce short-lived storms followed by chillier temperatures. Warm fronts change the weather slowly and increase the heat. Meteorologists use thermometers, anemometers, and hygrometers to measure air temperature, wind, and humidity, and a barometer to record air pressure, all of which help them in their forecasting. The data are collected by the National Weather Service, weather maps are created, and information is sent to radio, television, and newspapers to prepare people for storms or sunshine, cold snaps, or heat waves. The easy-to-read text presents the facts clearly and simply. Lively, colorful, cartoon-style illustrations show the scientific concepts and instruments and ordinary people experiencing weather phenomena. The book is part of the "Let's Read-and-Find-Out Science" series. 2002 (orig. 1991), HarperCollins,
— Patricia Dole
Children's Literature - Beverly Kobrin
Ms. DeWitt explains and Ms. Croll illustrates what meteorologists do, what their instruments measure, what causes changes in the weather, and why it is often unpredictable. She also emphasizes the importance of record keeping which makes the process of prediction more accurate. A "Let's-Read-And-Find-Out-Science" book. 1993 (orig.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060215972
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/01/1991
Series:
Let's-Read-and-Find-out Science Books Series
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
9.25(w) x 7.23(h) x 0.39(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Author Bio
Lynda DeWitt is an editor in the Educational Media Division of the National Geographic Society, and has published wildlife articles in various publications. She lives in Washington, D. C.

Illustrator BioCarolyn Croll is the author/illustrator of several books for children and has illustrated numerous other titles, including another Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science Book, Switch On, Switch Off by Mel Berger. She lives in Philadelphia.

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