Whatcha Mean, What's a Zine?

Overview


A zine is a handmade magazine or mini-comic about anything you can imagine: favorite bands, personal stories, subcultures, or collections. They contain diary entries, rants, interviews, and stories. They can be by one person or many, found in stores, traded at comic conventions, exchanged with friends, or given away for free. Zines are not a new idea: they’ve been around for years under various names (chapbooks, flyers, pamphlets). People with independent ideas have been ...
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Overview


A zine is a handmade magazine or mini-comic about anything you can imagine: favorite bands, personal stories, subcultures, or collections. They contain diary entries, rants, interviews, and stories. They can be by one person or many, found in stores, traded at comic conventions, exchanged with friends, or given away for free. Zines are not a new idea: they’ve been around for years under various names (chapbooks, flyers, pamphlets). People with independent ideas have been getting their word out since before there were printing presses.

This book is for anyone who wants to create their own zine. It’s for learning tips and tricks from contributors who have been at the fore front of the zine movement. It’s for getting inspired to put thoughts and ideas down on paper. It’s for learning how to design and print your own zine so you can put it in others’ hands. Whatcha Mean, What’s a Zine? is for anyone who has something to say.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"This well-designed and entertaining resource is sure to find an audience among hip, artistic, and do-it-yourself enthusiasts." School Library Journal, Starred

"Addictively enthusiastic and utterly inspiring...Each page is full of awesome advice from the 'zine world's head honchos." - Bust

Children's Literature - Vanessa Richardson
Including work from creators of several independent comics, this book would be good for anywhere from the young adult interested in learning about or creating their own Zine, to a die-hard mini comic book fan. The table of contents is a bit daunting, with hand-lettering and typewritten layout, but it gets the reader into the Zine slap-it-together-punk-rock-artsy frame of mind. The book is beautifully printed using two-color printing, good quality paper, and a soft cover reminiscent of mini comics and Zines. It may not have worked as well as a hard cover. With artists such as punk-rock Giant Robot creator Eric Nakamura, to the more slick and layered comic book style of Dan Zettwoch, this book thoroughly explains the meaning and reasons behind Zines and Indie Comics. It includes quotes from creators of zines and independent comics, explaining in detail their humble beginnings and what drew them into the Zine world. Samples of hand-drawn comics about personal experiences teach the reader in a very entertaining way even more about the process and the reason that people have gotten into Zines. Anyone with a message, opinion, or just a story to tell can make a Zine using materials available to us all. They share how to silkscreen, collate, and even how to staple and use other binding methods. One chapter includes a list of things you can make a Zine about, teaches about the art of the interview, discusses all the different formats of Zines, and gives invaluable resources to help you make your very own Zine.
VOYA
Even in these days of blogs and podcasting, print zines still thrive. Long-time zinesters Todd and Watson bring together text and artwork from more than twenty other zine and mini-comic creators for an inside look at this underground genre. With more than one hundred zine-ish looking pages, this book is packed with useful information for aspiring zinesters. Teens already familiar with the format will have no trouble following the quirky typed and handwritten layout. Those used to slick, stylish type may have some trouble navigating, although the two-color printing of the finished book should make it easier to read than the uncorrected proof. Several sections, particularly the information on silk screening, are more advanced than most teens, especially those just starting out, would need, but because each page or two is a self-contained article, skipping around is not a problem. The information on formatting and printing alone is a goldmine and a great resource for teachers and librarians doing art and writing projects with youth. The book is a one-stop source for someone putting together a zine or comic program and worth the purchase for public libraries looking for innovative and interesting ways to encourage teens to create. VOYA CODES: 3Q 3P M J S (Readable without serious defects; Will appeal with pushing; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2006, Graphia/Houghton Mifflin, 112p.; Glossary. Illus., Trade pb. Ages 11 to 18.
—Vikki Terrile
School Library Journal
Gr 6 Up-Some of the biggest names in zine publishing have united to create a fun, informative introduction to the art form in the format of a zine itself. True to its title, it begins by defining terms: a zine is a mini-magazine or homemade comic about any topic of the creator's choice, designed for maximum creativity and expression. The authors present a history of self-publishing and a treatise on Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Edison, and William Blake as the first pre-zinesters. Other topics include ideas for zine subjects; copying, binding, and printing tips, including easy-to-understand silk-screening and gocco instruction; and even a review of staplers, all while maintaining a fresh and inspirational tone. Other useful sections are an interview with BUST magazine founder Laurie Henzel, an original zinester, and guidelines on beating writer's block and disciplining oneself to work on a zine. The book presents a convincing argument for zines over blogs as a better outlet for personal creativity. The authors include tips for a cooperative zine among friends and fellow artists, how to distribute a publication and create contacts, advice on pricing supplies, mail, and invoices. The book also includes a brief list of resources, zine libraries, and a glossary. Throughout, technical terms are deftly used and advice is dispensed in an accessible, rousing format that includes comics, drawings, and cut-and-paste zine techniques. This well-designed and entertaining resource is sure to find an audience among hip, artistic, and do-it-yourself enthusiasts.-Jane Cronkhite, Cuyahoga County Public Library, OH Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780618563159
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 6/26/2006
  • Pages: 112
  • Sales rank: 441,914
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.25 (d)

Meet the Author


Once they discovered zines, Mark Todd and Esther Pearl Watson never stopped making them. They've had illustrations in Rolling Stone and Entertainment Weekly and on CD covers and MTV; they've written and illustrated picture books; their paintings appear in art galleries-and still they keep making zines (and lots of friends while they're at it). They live and work in southern California.

Like many kids raised in the 70's, Mark was influenced at an early age by Star Wars and comic books. Unlike many kids, he grew up just a few miles from the Vegas strip, its neon and glitz looming over the city. He graduated with honors from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California and currently lives and works in the Los Angeles area with his wife, artist Esther Pearl Watson, their daughter Lili and Mr. Pickles, a lovely French Bulldog.

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Inspirational

    At about $12 it seemed a bit expensive for a paperback, but it is filled with so much great information about zines. I have read and re-read it so many times. It is great to use to get little ideas for making your own zines. The entire book is handwritten and typed on a type writer and has the same asthetics as a real zine. I keep it by my bed and just flip through it when I'm looking for some ideas.
    If you are interested in zines and want to know more about them, then this book is perfect for you. Definitly worth getting.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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