Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow?

Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow?

by Brian Fies
     
 

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Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow?, the long-awaited follow-up to Mom's Cancer, is a unique graphic novel that tells the story of a young boy and his relationship with his father. Spanning the period from the 1939 New York World's Fair to the last Apollo space mission in 1975, it is told through the eyes of a boy as he grows up in an era that was optimistic

Overview

Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow?, the long-awaited follow-up to Mom's Cancer, is a unique graphic novel that tells the story of a young boy and his relationship with his father. Spanning the period from the 1939 New York World's Fair to the last Apollo space mission in 1975, it is told through the eyes of a boy as he grows up in an era that was optimistic and ambitious, fueled by industry, engines, electricity, rockets, and the atom bomb. An insightful look at relationships and the promise of the future, award-winning author Brian Fies presents his story in a way that only comics and graphic novels can. Interspersed with the comic book adventures of Commander Cap Crater (created by Fies to mirror the styles of the comics and the time periods he is depicting), and mixing art and historical photographs, this groundbreaking graphic novel is a lively trip through a half century of technological evolution. It is also a perceptive look at the changing moods of our nation-and the enduring promise of the future.

Editorial Reviews

In his Eisner Award–winning graphic novel Mom's Cancer, Brian Fies related the story of how his family responded to a medical catastrophe. In this stand-alone follow-up to that stunning debut, he presents the changing dynamics of a boy and his father. Told through the eyes of the young boy, Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow? is both a story of two men and the epic of four decades of American life and faith in the future.
Library Journal
Fies's follow-up to his excellent first graphic novel, the Eisner-winning Mom's Cancer, explores the history of popular futurism. Opening with the gleaming 1939 World's Fair, Fies chronicles a young boy and his father as the boy grows super-slowly (in "comics time") to a rebellious college age by the 1975 Apollo-Soyuz mission. Between, Fies compellingly invokes the stories of Werner von Braun, Chesley Bonestell, Walt Disney, and the Gemini astronauts, often incorporating original photographs as he charts how 1950s American optimism about the future flourished and then faded in late 1960s and early 1970s turmoil. Inserted Commander Cap Crater comic books in period styles illustrate each decade's zeitgeist and provide many in-jokes for fans of older comics. Throughout most of the book, Fies wisely tempers wide-eyed wonder by acknowledging the dark side of scientific progress—but emotionally, he's clearly on the side of the optimists. His sometimes overearnest tone can awaken reader cynicism, however, and at points the weight of didactic narration risks overwhelming the story's emotional aspects. VERDICT Thought-provoking, this is recommended for fans of Jim Ottaviani's science GNs or Larry Gonick's Cartoon History books.—S.R.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781613122693
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
08/15/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
777,533
File size:
78 MB
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This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Brian Fies is a science writer, illustrator, and cartoonist whose widely acclaimed first graphic novel, Mom's Cancer, won the 2005 Eisner Award for Best Digital Comic (the first web comic to win the award and inaugurate this new category), the Lulu Blooker Prize for Best Comic, the Harvey Award for Best New Talent, and the German Youth Literature Prize, among other awards and recognition. He lives in northern California.

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