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What's a Commie Ever Done to Black People?: A Korean War Memoir of Fighting in the U.S. Army's Last All Negro Unit
     

What's a Commie Ever Done to Black People?: A Korean War Memoir of Fighting in the U.S. Army's Last All Negro Unit

by Curtis Morrow
 

On March 27, 1950, the author turned 17; ten days later he enlisted in the U.S. Army. During his training in Fort Belvoir, Virginia, he first learned of the “police action” in Korea, and like many others he volunteered for duty there. His biggest fear was that the action would be over by the time he arrived in Korea.
Private Morrow was assigned as a

Overview

On March 27, 1950, the author turned 17; ten days later he enlisted in the U.S. Army. During his training in Fort Belvoir, Virginia, he first learned of the “police action” in Korea, and like many others he volunteered for duty there. His biggest fear was that the action would be over by the time he arrived in Korea.
Private Morrow was assigned as a rifleman in the 24th Infantry Regiment Combat Team, one of the most outstanding units in Korea and the last all black army unit; he served with distinction until he was wounded. After a short stint in Pusan, he became a paratrooper and rigger in the 8081st Airborne and Resupplying Company stationed in southern Japan. Throughout his time in the service, Private Morrow had to face the institutional racism of the U.S. Army where black soldiers consistently served longer and performed more dangerous duties than white soldiers. The effects of this on the 18-year-old private were longterm—and are described here.

Editorial Reviews

MultiCultural Review
a significant contribution to the still-developing body of literature on African Americans in the Korean War
VOYA
"fast-paced...gripping"
From the Publisher
“a significant contribution to the still-developing body of literature on African Americans in the Korean War”—MultiCultural Review; “fast-paced...gripping”—VOYA.
VOYA - Jamie Hansen
Morrow, a seventeen-year-old black youth from Chicago, enlisted in the United States Army in April 1950. Eight months later, he landed in Inchon, Korea, to serve on the front line of the bloody "police action" of the Korean War. In the next nine months, Morrow would be forced to fight in a horrifying war to support a racist United States against an enemy who seemed to pose less of a threat than "Whitey." Morrow's fast-paced memoir is both a gripping war story and a coming-of-age saga. The cold, hunger, and terror of reconnaissance marches through the bleak Korean winter are described in blunt and matter-of-fact prose. The descriptions of enemy engagements and night marches are interspersed with the soldiers' discussions of their resentment at giving their lives for the white America that had enslaved and abused the black race. Out of these bitter and poignant remarks, Morrow began to formulate his own mature political consciousness. The memoir includes frank and often vulgar language and detailed descriptions of the author's encounters with Japanese and Korean prostitutes. It should be popular with older teenagers who have enjoyed recent works on the Vietnam war. The stark black-and-white photograph and snappy title certainly will attract readers. Index. Illus. Photos. VOYA Codes: 3Q 2P S (Readable without serious defects, For the YA with a special interest in the subject, Senior High-defined as grades 10 to 12).

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786403332
Publisher:
McFarland & Company, Incorporated Publishers
Publication date:
02/01/1997
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.28(d)

Meet the Author

A goldsmith and jewelry maker, Curtis “Kojo” Morrow has been very active in African American affairs in Chicago. His writings have appeared in such publications as the Chicago Defender and Afrique.

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