What's Happening to Home?: Balancing Work, Life and Refuge in the Information Age

Overview

Our ways of working, the way we think of marriage, how we communicate with each other, how we define family, have all been transformed. And as a result, some very basic and important things are happening to the way we think about "home." Just how deep the changes are -- and how people are coping -- is what this book is all about. Not only are we bringing our work home, we're carrying it with us. Work is now never more than a beep away. And as if this were not enough, we are turning the workplace into a surrogate ...
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2002-02-01 Hardcover New Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Tracking number ... provided in your Amazon account with every order. Item is Brand New! Read more Show Less

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Overview

Our ways of working, the way we think of marriage, how we communicate with each other, how we define family, have all been transformed. And as a result, some very basic and important things are happening to the way we think about "home." Just how deep the changes are -- and how people are coping -- is what this book is all about. Not only are we bringing our work home, we're carrying it with us. Work is now never more than a beep away. And as if this were not enough, we are turning the workplace into a surrogate home. Men and women, single parents, single people, male breadwinners, working women, homemaker moms, the Internet generation, aging Boomers -- all of us -- are having to take another look at the kind of home that we and our parents have taken for granted.

What have we lost? And how important is our loss? In this insightful, important new book, Maggie Jackson reports on how a wide variety of people are answering these basic, life-shaping questions and redefining home. Not everyone is happy with their answers, but everyone knows there is a question that must be answered ... What is a home in the 21st century?

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Jackson, an Associated Press workplace columnist, asserts that Americans have rephrased the maxim "home is where the heart is." According to her, home has been transformed from a haven offering solitude from the world to something akin to a railroad station. She has spent years observing Americans' work habits and lifestyles, noting the career trends that have transformed the country. She creates a map charting the evolution of the changing workplace, positing that only as paid work moved outside the home did family life become more intimate and homes grow private. By the Industrial Age, the home was idealized as a sanctuary. But now we live in an era in which people who have their own communications technology constantly scramble to build new barriers and adjust the degree of access others have to them. Jackson also addresses those who work from home, who, she writes, are stressed because they can't escape work and because home offices create forced intimacy as clients venture into what was once a very private domain. According to Jackson, the result of all of this hustling from home has been a market in which some of the topselling home furniture is designed to bring work into all parts of the house. That's a plus for furniture manufacturers; however, all of this obsessing over work has left many children stranded. Jackson has crafted an insightful book, more a cultural study than a guidebook, that will make readers reexamine how, where and why they work. (Feb.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Publishers Weekly
Jackson, an Associated Press workplace columnist, asserts that Americans have rephrased the maxim "home is where the heart is." According to her, home has been transformed from a haven offering solitude from the world to something akin to a railroad station. She has spent years observing Americans' work habits and lifestyles, noting the career trends that have transformed the country. She creates a map charting the evolution of the changing workplace, positing that only as paid work moved outside the home did family life become more intimate and homes grow private. By the Industrial Age, the home was idealized as a sanctuary. But now we live in an era in which people who have their own communications technology constantly scramble to build new barriers and adjust the degree of access others have to them. Jackson also addresses those who work from home, who, she writes, are stressed because they can't escape work and because home offices create forced intimacy as clients venture into what was once a very private domain. According to Jackson, the result of all of this hustling from home has been a market in which some of the topselling home furniture is designed to bring work into all parts of the house. That's a plus for furniture manufacturers; however, all of this obsessing over work has left many children stranded. Jackson has crafted an insightful book, more a cultural study than a guidebook, that will make readers reexamine how, where and why they work. (Feb.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Not a book exhorting families to return to another time, this is instead a provocative look at work and family that challenges us to examine our lives and find our own solutions. In the first part, Jackson, a workplace columnist for the Associated Press, shows how work is creeping into the home and asks whether we need a home and what it provides us. From there, she examines what we can do to create a haven. Although Jackson acknowledges that home and work activities will continue to mesh as technology becomes more and more pervasive, she stresses the need for privacy in time and space. She also recognizes that we are unlikely to return to a day when women are the primary housekeepers; instead, she believes that everyone (woman, man, or child) can contribute to the creation of a home. Homes, Jackson says, can coexist with mobility and technology if we "make [them] places of experience, rootedness, learning, and sharing." Highly recommended. Kay Brodie, Chesapeake Coll., Wye Mills, MD Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781893732407
  • Publisher: Ave Maria Press
  • Publication date: 2/28/2002
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 6.28 (w) x 9.41 (h) x 0.71 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments 9
Introduction 11
Part 1 The Losses of Home 19
1. The Architecture of Home-Work: From Computer Armoires to Digital Walls 21
Diary: Room-to-Room Nomad 37
2. Private Lives: Making Time for Home in a Connected World 39
Diary: Cell-Phoning on the Hayride 58
3. Orphaning Domesticity: Of Apron Strings and Hotel Living 61
Diary: The Dinner Hour 80
Part 2 Toward a New Vision of Home 83
4. Creating a Home at Work: The Lure of the New Company Town 85
Diary: A Place to Work 101
5. Home-ing: Domestic Moves in Search of Refuge 105
Diary: Campobello 123
6. Ett Hem (A Home): An Ever-Evolving Canvas for Human Relations 127
Diary: Time, Space, and a Table 145
7. Beyond Four Walls: Rediscovering and Reinventing Home 149
Diary Epilogue: Thinking Out Loud 162
Notes 165
Selected Bibliography 183
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