What's Inside?

What's Inside?

by Giles Laroche
     
 


As it takes us on a tour of some of the most unique and beautiful structures, this book shows how the purpose of each structure dictated its design, or location. Here are soaring glass skyscrapers (for working people) and a humble stone barn (for working animals); a sealed tomb hewn out of a limestone hillside (for buried reasure) and a majestic marble building,…  See more details below

Overview


As it takes us on a tour of some of the most unique and beautiful structures, this book shows how the purpose of each structure dictated its design, or location. Here are soaring glass skyscrapers (for working people) and a humble stone barn (for working animals); a sealed tomb hewn out of a limestone hillside (for buried reasure) and a majestic marble building, honoring a goddess. As it reveals what lies inside each structure, this book gives insight into the people who designed these buildings -- into their hopes, their lives, and their concepts of beauty. Included -- for budding engineers and architects -- are statistics such as the year built, square footage, materials used, height, and other little known statistics.

Structures included are: Tomb of Tutankamumn in Thebes, Egypt The Parthenon in Athens, Greece Temple of Kukulcan in Chichen Itza, Mexico Buddha's Place in Shanxi Province, China Walled city of Toldeo in Spain Alcazar Castle in Segovia, Spain Independence Hall in Philadelphia Shaker dairy barn in Hancock, MA A Circus big top tent, which traveled to many American cities The Guggenhem Museum in NYC The Sydney Opera House in Sydney, Australia The Petrona Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia The Georgia Aquarium in Georgia, Atlanta

Read More

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"In his first book as both author and illustrator, Laroche uses his trademark collage technique, combining drawing, painting, and cut-paper. This isn’t a lift-the-flap, question-and-answer title to browse through quickly. The minute detail celebrates the awe-inspiring constructions with a focus reminiscent of David Macaulay’s work. This will have many grade-schoolers poring over the pages for a long time."--Booklist

"Bas-relief cut-paper collages and brief text take readers on a tour of unique architectural structures around the world."--Kirkus Reviews

"The text is good, the organization is clever, but it’s the art here that is truly masterful. The illustrations are made from layers and layers of cut and painted paper, and in fact may be considered sculpture–the visible dimensionality gives each page a deep tactile quality. Animals, people, domestic scenes, and landscapes both natural and manmade are depicted with skill and charm: the intricacy of this art will hold readers spellbound. The book is brought to a satisfying close with a loving re-creation of a North American small-town street and the interior of a lighted room in which two children create ziggurats and temples out of blocks and read What’s Inside?"--School Library Journal

"Laroche deploys the guessing-game structure and fabulously detailed collages to intrigue an older set of readers . . . structurs hold visual surprises . . . This is an obvious draw for viewers who delight in . . . detail, and also an inspiration for kids with scissors, paper, and patience."--The Bulletin

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Laroche takes us around the world to more than a dozen locations. Picturing the outside of the place, he asks, "What's inside?" Then he shows us, offering a summary paragraph of explanation plus, along the side of the page, a listing of the important facts about it. Included for exploration are King Tut's tomb, the Mayan temple of Kukulcan, the Wooden Pagoda in China, the Puerta del Sol in Toledo and the Alcazar castle in Segovia, Spain, Independence Hall in Philadelphia, a Shaker barn in Massachusetts, a traveling circus tent, the Guggenheim Museum in New York City, the Sydney Opera House, the Petronas Twin Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, the aquarium in Atlanta, Georgia, and finally a town street. Inside a building there, two children are reading this book, with the locations of the sites marked on a map on the wall. The cut paper bas-reliefs that deliver the visual information are made with a precision that cleverly simulates the materials of the actual subjects. Perhaps it is the double-page scene of Toledo, with its crowded complex of buildings including the towering cathedral, with citizens busily engaged in their activities in the streets, that holds our attention the most. But all the visuals are impressive, with the unusual use of paper sculpture adding significantly to our appreciation. A glossary and bibliography are included. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Children's Literature - Paula K. Zeller
What's inside a pyramid rising above a flat jungle? This "red throne in the shape of a jaguar," with yellow eyes and green spots of jade, has stood in the Mayan Temple of Kukulcan since 850 AD. What's inside a harbor-side building with a roof that looks like "billowing sails or giant seashells?" Music! This is the Sydney Opera House, which took 12 years to build because of its complex design. The text of this book is as multilayered as its intricate collages by author-illustrator Giles Laroche. Right-hand pages briefly introduce the buildings, and stunning bas-relief, cut-paper collages show a detailed view. The question at the bottom of the page—"What's Inside?" or, in a few cases, "Who's Inside?"—spurs the reader to the payoff at the page turn: a richly detailed interior view and fascinating historical or cultural information. These pages also include a sidebar of succinct facts, including the name of the building, location, date of construction, materials, current status, and little known facts (for example, sealed boxes inside King Tutankamun's tomb contained a variety of foods, including raisins, onions, and meat). The final question and the wordless double-page spread that follows literally bring home the message that each building is designed for a specific purpose. An illustrated glossary of architectural terms is included. This book is a delightful introduction to architecture and a just plain good read for kids who love to know what's behind closed doors. Reviewer: Paula K. Zeller
School Library Journal

Gr 3-7

This beautiful book presents interior and exterior views of 14 extraordinary structures, from King Tut's tomb and the Temple of Kukulcan to the Sydney Opera House and the Georgia Aquarium. Each one is first shown and described from the outside-but not identified-until the question is posed: "What's inside?" The next page identifies the building and answers the question, offering specifics about what is happening in this picture, with salient facts such as the name, location, date of construction, materials, etc., listed in the left margin. The text is good, the organization is clever, but it's the art here that is truly masterful. The illustrations are made from layers and layers of cut and painted paper, and in fact may be considered sculpture-the visible dimensionality gives each page a deep tactile quality. Animals, people, domestic scenes, and landscapes both natural and manmade are depicted with skill and charm: the intricacy of this art will hold readers spellbound. The book is brought to a satisfying close with a loving re-creation of a North American small-town street and the interior of a lighted room in which two children create ziggurats and temples out of blocks and read What's Inside? - Paula Willey, Baltimore County Public Library, Towson, MD

Kirkus Reviews
Bas-relief cut-paper collages and brief text take readers on a tour of unique architectural structures around the world. Undeviating in its organization, this volume first presents an illustration and prose description of a building or structure, followed by the phrase "What's Inside?" The following page reveals the answer again in picture and prose. For example, after a picture of a stepped pyramid with a door in the bottom and a brief description, readers discover, on the following page, that the pyramid is a Mayan temple featuring a red jaguar throne with jade spots and eyes. Sidebars provide some basic facts including the name of each building, its location, date of construction, materials, its status today and a "little known fact." Vocabulary and sentence structure suggest a target audience of older children, but the lack of depth and detail suggest otherwise and render this one too superficial for most school assignments. Unfortunately, the intricate collage illustrations and question/answer format are not enough to make this a likely leisure-reading favorite either. (Informational picture book. 6-10)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618862474
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
04/06/2009
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.60(w) x 11.50(h) x 1.50(d)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

Meet the Author


Giles Laroche lives in Salem, Massachusetts. His amazing paper relief art has illustrated many children’s books. This is his first book for Houghton Mifflin.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >