What's Mine Is Yours: The Rise of Collaborative Consumption

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Overview

A groundbreaking, original book that explores the rise of “Collaborative Consumption”—a cultural and economic force transforming business, consumerism, and the way we live.The recent changes in our economic landscape have only exposed and intensified a phenomenon: an explosion in sharing, bartering, lending, trading, renting, gifting, and swapping. From enormous marketplaces such as eBay and craigslist to emerging sectors such as peer-to-peer lending (Zopa) and car sharing (Zipcar), Collaborative Consumption is ...
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What's Mine Is Yours: The Rise of Collaborative Consumption

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Overview

A groundbreaking, original book that explores the rise of “Collaborative Consumption”—a cultural and economic force transforming business, consumerism, and the way we live.The recent changes in our economic landscape have only exposed and intensified a phenomenon: an explosion in sharing, bartering, lending, trading, renting, gifting, and swapping. From enormous marketplaces such as eBay and craigslist to emerging sectors such as peer-to-peer lending (Zopa) and car sharing (Zipcar), Collaborative Consumption is disrupting outdated modes of business and reinventing not only what we consume but how we consume. While ranging enormously in scale and purpose, these companies and organizations are redefining how goods and services are exchanged, valued, and created—in areas as diverse as finance and travel, agriculture and technology, education and retail. Traveling among global entrepreneurs and revolutionaries and exploring rising ventures as well as established companies adapting to these opportunities, the authors outline in bold and imaginative ways how Collaborative Consumption may very well change the world.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Business consultant Botsman and entrepreneur Rogers track the rise of a fascinating new consumer behavior they call "collaborative consumption." Driven by growing dissatisfaction with their role as robotic consumers manipulated by marketing, people are turning more and more to models of consumption that emphasize usefulness over ownership, community over selfishness, and sustainability over novelty. A number of new businesses have emerged to serve this new market, exploiting the ability of the Internet to create networks of shared interests and trust and to simplify the logistics of collective use. Businesses such as bike-sharing service BIXI; toy library BabyPlays; solar power service SolarCity; and the Clothing Exchange, a clothing swap service, help users enjoy products or services without the expense, maintenance hassle, and social isolation of individual ownership. Part cultural critique and part practical guide to the fledgling collaborative consumption market, the book provides a wealth of information for consumers looking to redefine their relationships with both the things they use and the communities they live in. (Oct.)
Tony Hsieh
"What can the next wave of collaborative marketplaces look like? Botsman and Rogers answer this question in a highly readable and persuasive way. Anyone interested in the business opportunities and social power of collaboration should consider reading this book."
Craig Newmark
"People are normally trustworthy and generous, and the Internet brings the good out far more than the bad. We’re seeing an explosion of modest businesses where people help each other out via the Net, and What’s Mine is Yours tells you what’s going on, and inspires more of the same."
Adam Gopnik
"Rachel Botsman and Roo Rogers have offered a convincing, charming and in every sense collaborative account of how the new networks that have disrupted our lives are also likely to alter them, and entirely for our good."
Steven Johnson
"Amidst a thousand tirades against the excesses and waste of consumer society, What’s Mine Is Yours offers us something genuinely new and invigorating: a way out. Anyone interested in the emerging economics and culture of collaboration will want to read this profoundly hopeful book."
Delta Sky
"This is an inspiring book about innovating entrepreneurs in an economy where people are seeking ways to connect with each other- through business."
Vogue Australia
"The latest buzzword and trend is defining how we do business in the new millennium"
Emergent by Design
"The authors give hundreds of examples of how people are finding new ways to share and exchange value…[T]he book is packed with some pretty interesting statistics…If you’re unaware of what’s happening in the peer-to-peer exchange space, this book will quickly bring you up to speed."
The Australian
"[F]ull of impressive examples of entrepreneurs establishing new markets. Ultimately, the authors’ optimism is infectious."
The Economist
"Collaborative consumption is an ideal signalling device for an economy based on electronic brands and ever-changing fashions."
Edwards Magazine Bookclub
"[T]he authors have laid out the social and economic logic for collaborative consumption with such religious fervour and zeal that one can’t help but become converted to this new world order."
—The Economist
“Collaborative consumption is an ideal signalling device for an economy based on electronic brands and ever-changing fashions.”
—Delta Sky
“This is an inspiring book about innovating entrepreneurs in an economy where people are seeking ways to connect with each other- through business.”
—Vogue Australia
“The latest buzzword and trend is defining how we do business in the new millennium”
—Edwards Magazine Bookclub
“[T]he authors have laid out the social and economic logic for collaborative consumption with such religious fervour and zeal that one can’t help but become converted to this new world order.”
—Emergent by Design
“The authors give hundreds of examples of how people are finding new ways to share and exchange value…[T]he book is packed with some pretty interesting statistics…If you’re unaware of what’s happening in the peer-to-peer exchange space, this book will quickly bring you up to speed.”
—Tony Hsieh
“What can the next wave of collaborative marketplaces look like? Botsman and Rogers answer this question in a highly readable and persuasive way. Anyone interested in the business opportunities and social power of collaboration should consider reading this book.”
—Craig Newmark
“People are normally trustworthy and generous, and the Internet brings the good out far more than the bad. We’re seeing an explosion of modest businesses where people help each other out via the Net, and What’s Mine is Yours tells you what’s going on, and inspires more of the same.”
—Adam Gopnik
“Rachel Botsman and Roo Rogers have offered a convincing, charming and in every sense collaborative account of how the new networks that have disrupted our lives are also likely to alter them, and entirely for our good.”
—Steven Johnson
“Amidst a thousand tirades against the excesses and waste of consumer society, What’s Mine Is Yours offers us something genuinely new and invigorating: a way out. Anyone interested in the emerging economics and culture of collaboration will want to read this profoundly hopeful book.”
—The Australian
“[F]ull of impressive examples of entrepreneurs establishing new markets. Ultimately, the authors’ optimism is infectious.”
Library Journal - BookSmack!
Rachel and Roo (same name as the newest NBC sitcom, oddly) define collaborative consumption as "bartering, lending, trading, renting, gifting, and swapping, redefined through technology and peer communities." It's that age-old activity-sharing-with coworkers, neighbors, your FB peeps, whomever. For something so simple, it sure is popular, profitable for businesses, and good at reducing waste and saving money, leading me to the conclusion that it must have been the forgotten brainchild of Jimmy Carter and Buckminster Fuller. And though the authors slant healthily toward reducing our throwaway culture (how many Styrofoam cups did you use today, boy?), they are not ideologues on an anticapitalist rant. I see the movement as dude-friendly, as it presents solutions that fit the needs of most. Perhaps the best aspect of the book is what it isn't: a dumbed-down pastiche of self-help and personal economizing. If you've ever traded your mad computer skillz for help building a deck, you did collaborative consumption. This book introduced me to dozens of sites that will save me dinero the next time I need something free (Freecycle, OurSwaps, SwapTree), have to rent something for cheap (Zilok), or borrow money (Zopa) to go to Argentina (Airtobnb, CouchSurfing). Just don't lend your copy to the hoarder who lives down the street. He doesn't need more crap. — Douglas Lord, "Books for Dudes," Booksmack! 2/3/11
From the Publisher
"A convincing, charming and in every sense collaborative account of how the new networks that have disrupted our lives are also likely to alter them, and entirely for our good." —-Adam Gopnik, author of Paris to the Moon
Library Journal
Business consultant Botsman and entrepreneur Rogers (director, Redscout Ventures) tout the benefits of access to products and services without the cost, burden, or responsibility of ownership. Their coined notion of "collaborative consumption" is beyond the toy sharing we learned in childhood. Citing dozens of examples from across the world, they look at how businesses like Netflix, Zipcar, Zopa, and Swaptree are revolutionizing the exchange, value, and creation of goods and services through networked technology and peer communities. Veteran narrator Kevin Foley delivers an effective performance of this fascinating and timely book; business community leaders will want multiple listens. [More at www.collaborativeconsumption.com.—Ed.]—M. Gail Preslar, Eastman Chemical Co. Business Lib., Kingsport, TN
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061963544
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/14/2010
  • Pages: 279
  • Sales rank: 502,992
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Rachel Botsman writes, consults, and speaks on the power of collaboration and sharing, and on how it can transform the way we live. She received her BFA (Honors) from the University of Oxford, and undertook her postgraduate studies at Harvard University. She has consulted with businesses around the world on brand and innovation strategy and was a former director at the William J. Clinton Foundation. Rachel has lived and worked in the UK, USA, Asia, and Australia.

Roo Rogers is an entrepreneur and the president of Redscout Ventures, a venture company in New York. He has served as the cofounding partner of OZOlab and the former CEO of OZOcar, and his other endeavors include Drive Thru Pictures, UNITY TV, and Wenite. He received his BA from Columbia College, and his Masters in Economic Development from University College London. He lives in New York City.

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Table of Contents

Introduction: What's Mine Is Yours

PART 1 CONTEXT

One Enough Is Enough 3

Two All-Consuming 19

Three From Generation Me to Generation We 41

PART 2 GROUNDSWELL

Four The Rise of Collaborative Consumption 67

Five Better Than Ownership 97

Six What Goes Around Comes Around 123

Seven We Are All in This Together 153

PART 3 IMPLICATIONS

Eight Collaborative Design 185

Nine Community Is the Brand 199

Ten The Evolution of Collaborative Consumption 211

Acknowledgments 227

Interviewees 231

Collaborative Consumption Hub 235

Selected Bibliography 237

Notes 243

Index 269

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 9, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Finding a glimmer of hope in the economic environment is a chall

    Finding a glimmer of hope in the economic environment is a challenge these days – particularly in the aftermath of the recession. But business writer Rachel Botsman and entrepreneur Roo Rogers make you feel optimistic about the concept of “collaborative consumption” and its potential to alter the way people conduct business – and business relationships. The authors cite many user-friendly marketplaces where consumers share, rent, trade and barter while creating meaningful, human connections. Botsman and Rogers suggest that financial upheaval has paved a pathway to a kinder, more introspective era that will bring out the innate goodness and spirit of cooperation in individuals. Naive or brilliant, you decide. getAbstract recommends this book to marketers interested in how the marketplace is shifting and believes that anyone seeking some positive economic news will enjoy this informative, delightful and uplifting work.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2012

    S¿X SLAVES

    At toyz result one! You can come an rent,buy,or sell one! They will do what ever you say! Toyz result one! (Not a typo)

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