What's Wrong With My Fruit Garden?: 100% Organic Solutions for Berries, Trees, Nuts, Vines, and Tropicals

What's Wrong With My Fruit Garden?: 100% Organic Solutions for Berries, Trees, Nuts, Vines, and Tropicals

by David Deardorff, Kathryn Wadsworth
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

What’s next for the bestselling What's Wrong book series? One of the most challenging parts of the garden—the delicious but disease-prone fruit garden.

Overview

What’s next for the bestselling What's Wrong book series? One of the most challenging parts of the garden—the delicious but disease-prone fruit garden.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
11/18/2013
This volume, the third of the authors’ What Is Wrong With… series, is the inevitable culmination of the quest for an all-inclusive harvest on the organic farm. Fruit develops in multiple stages: sprouting, blooming, shedding, regenerating, growing, ripening, and being ready to drop. At any one point environmental factors could interfere with healthy growth. Deardorff and Wadsworth arm the gardener with needed strategies that lessen the risk of failure and encourage robust growth. Growing apricots, for example, is a good all-around choice because the trees are hardy, drought-tolerant, fruit-producing, and ornamental, with showy foliage and flowers. Apricots provide the complex structure that creates a habitat for “pollinators, predators, and parasitoids, all beneficial organisms that contribute to your success in growing organic fruit.” This is an invaluable guide for the fruit farmer, whose patience, diligence, and vigilance in ever-changing ecosystems will bear tender and tasty fruit. (Dec. 11)
Sunset Magazine
"What's Wrong With My Fruit Garden? offers help for all kinds of fruit crises. What impressed us most is that the authors take an entirely organic approach."

Booklist - Carol Haggas
“Beyond comprehensive yet straight forward information about basic cultural techniques regarding planting, pollination, and propagation, Deardorff and Wadsworth offer photographic snapshots that help growers recognize common problems, from environmental disorders to water-related mismanagement… Both hobby and professional fruit growers may find this an essential resource.”

From the Publisher
“This is an invaluable guide.” —Publishers Weekly

“Beyond comprehensive yet straight forward information about basic cultural techniques regarding planting, pollination, and propagation, Deardorff and Wadsworth offer photographic snapshots that help growers recognize common problems, from environmental disorders to water-related mismanagement. . . . Both hobby and professional fruit growers may find this an essential resource.” —Booklist

“You can grow tasty, blemish-free fruits and nuts with much less work than you may think. . . . Well-organized and concise.” —American Gardener

What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden? offers help for all kinds of fruit crises. What impressed us most is that the authors take an entirely organic approach.” —Sunset
Sunset Magazine - Doreen Howard
"This is an invaluable guide."

Booklist
"What's Wrong With My Fruit Garden? offers help for all kinds of fruit crises. What impressed us most is that the authors take an entirely organic approach."

American Gardener
“Beyond comprehensive yet straight forward information about basic cultural techniques regarding planting, pollination, and propagation, Deardorff and Wadsworth offer photographic snapshots that help growers recognize common problems, from environmental disorders to water-related mismanagement… Both hobby and professional fruit growers may find this an essential resource.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781604693584
Publisher:
Timber Press, Incorporated
Publication date:
12/31/2013
Pages:
312
Sales rank:
537,779
Product dimensions:
7.60(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.80(d)

Read an Excerpt

Introduction: Prepare for Success
The quest for the most delectable, wholesome fruits and nuts has taken humankind to every part of the globe. When our ancestors traversed the savannah and spread outward, we initiated a long and successful survival strategy: hunting and gathering the incredible bounty of the natural world. Thousands of years later, we learned to save the seeds of our most precious plants, replanting them, and then returning to the same locations each season. Eventually we settled in one place and began to tend the plants that had become our benefactors.
    
The plants that feed us best are the ones we continue to tend with great care. In turn our care has become their most successful survival strategy. Apples from the mountains of Central Asia now grow worldwide, tended by their human caretakers throughout North America, New Zealand, Chile, and elsewhere. Oranges, walnuts, grapes, and blueberries thrive with an enormous entourage of people caring for their every need, because they have made themselves especially mouthwatering and sustaining for us.

Have you ever thought about the apparent intelligence of these resourceful plants on which we depend? We propagate them and ensure their pollination. We feed and water them, and tend them when they are ill. We have become tribes of caregivers, devoted to meeting all their requirements. Our service to our plant partners is a privilege and a gift. What better way to repay the kindness of nature, and to connect with the abundance of the natural world?
    
The reward for tending your own fruit garden goes beyond stewardship of the green world. It helps us too. There is an expanding body of evidence that indicates homegrown fruit has higher nutrient values and better flavor. The more we learn about the importance of a diet rich in antioxidants, the more we know it just makes sense to grow our own fruits and nuts. As anyone who has shopped for organic produce knows, it’s expensive, but over time cultivating it yourself will save you money. Even if you have only a small yard or balcony, given enough sunlight, you can raise fruit at home.
    
There are a few key factors to take into account while preparing for that bountiful harvest. Right from the start you need to know about temperature, soil, light, and water needs for plants you want to grow. With few exceptions, fruits and nuts are perennials. You commit to these plants for years, so choosing the right plant, putting it in the right place, and selecting the best cultivar for your situation and taste is really important. For instance, if you live in the subtropics, the right type of plant might be a banana and a good cultivar would be ‘Dwarf Cavendish,’ the easiest to grow in a small home garden.
    
Take some time to research pest- and disease-resistant plants that are available in your region. Some heirloom varieties and modern hybrids carry resistance in their genes. For example, both ‘Liberty’ and ‘Chehalis’ apple cultivars are resistant to apple scab, a common and serious fungal disease of apples worldwide. To find pest- or disease-resistant cultivars, look at plant labels and catalog descriptions. If they do not mention resistance, assume the plant is susceptible. Experienced neighbors or nearby fruit growers, extension agents, or master gardeners can give you local knowledge about who’s succeeding with which cultivars. This allows you to choose cultivars that are best suited to your location and likely to remain healthy.
    
When choosing a cultivar, local knowledge is invaluable. Talk to experienced neighbors, your county extension agent or master gardener organization, or local fruit clubs to determine which cultivars do best in your climate.

Meet the Author

David Deardorff, botanist and expert plant pathologist, loves to write and lecture about how to grow healthier plants. As a research biologist David has lived and gardened in many environments, from the desert southwest to the maritime northwest to the tropics. David earned his Ph.D. in botany from the University of Washington. He coordinated plant pathology research at the University of Hawaii and served as faculty advisor to the Master Gardener Program at Washington State University. He also co-founded Plants of the Southwest in Santa Fe, one of the first native plant nurseries in the country. He has served as Research Director at Island Biotropix, an orchid nursery and tissue culture laboratory which he co-owned with partner and co-author Kathryn Wadsworth.

Kathryn Wadsworth, writer, photographer, and naturalist, enjoys sharing the wonders of the natural world with others. While leading eco-tours around the world she has studied plant life and explored natural history from Australia to Alaska. In graduate school Kathryn studied film-making and communications at the University of New Mexico, where she made documentary films on a wide variety of topics ranging from the California Gray Whale to the impact of mining on the Navajo Nation. She has owned and operated a film production company, and with her partner and co-author David Deardorff, an orchid nursery, and a tissue culture laboratory.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >