BN.com Gift Guide

What's Wrong with the Europe Union and How to Fix It [NOOK Book]

Overview

The European Union seems incapable of undertaking economic reforms and defining its place in the world. Public apathy towards the EU is also increasing, as citizens feel isolated from the institutions in Brussels and see no way to influence European level decisions.

Taking a diagnosis and cure approach to the EU's difficulties, Simon Hix tackles these problems with distinct clarity and an open mind. What the EU needs, Hix contends, is more open political competition. This would ...

See more details below
What's Wrong with the Europe Union and How to Fix It

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price
(Save 43%)$22.95 List Price
Note: This NOOK Book can be purchased in bulk. Please email us for more information.

Overview

The European Union seems incapable of undertaking economic reforms and defining its place in the world. Public apathy towards the EU is also increasing, as citizens feel isolated from the institutions in Brussels and see no way to influence European level decisions.

Taking a diagnosis and cure approach to the EU's difficulties, Simon Hix tackles these problems with distinct clarity and an open mind. What the EU needs, Hix contends, is more open political competition. This would promote policy innovation, foster coalitions across the institutions, provide incentives for the media to cover developments in Brussels, and enable citizens to identify who governs in the EU and to take sides in policy debates. The EU is ready for this new challenge. The institutional reforms since the 1980s have transformed the EU into a more competitive polity, and political battles and coalitions are developing inside and between the European Parliament, the Council, and the Commission.

This emerging politics should be more central to the Brussels policy process, with clearer coalitions and identifiable winners and losers. The risks are low because the EU has multiple checks-and-balances. Yet, the potential benefits are high, as more open politics could enable the EU to overcome policy gridlock, rebuild public support, and reduce the democratic deficit. This indispensable book will be of great interest to students of the European politics, scholars, policy makers and anyone concerned with the future of the European Union.

About the Author:
Simon Hix is Professor of European and Comparative Politics at the London School of Economics and Political Science

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"An exciting, rigorous and compelling book. The fix of Hix makes much more sense than the Panglossians who want to do nothing or others who argue that all the EU's problems will be resolved with better PR and more procedural reforms."
International Affairs

"Hix's research makes a convincing case that left-right divisions have deeply penetrated policymaking in the parliament, the council and the commission. Missing is a contest for political power and policymaking between rival groups and policies, with clear winners and losers and a visible link between voting, leadership and outcome."
Irish Times

"[A] short and highly readable book, which began life as a series of policy papers written for the UK government."
Ethics and International Affairs

"Simon Hix's analysis is as authoritative as his case for reform is compelling. Reasoned, rigorous and riveting, this book is a must-read for all who care about the future of the European Union."
Sir Stephen Wall

"An exceptionally clear and provocative argument in favour of 'limited democratic politics' in the EU, showing precisely how it could be applied to the 2009 European elections."
Michael Shackleton, Secretariat of the European Parliament

"Simon Hix is among the leading political analysts of the European Union of his generation. Here he offers a critical yet balanced analysis of Europe's 'democratic deficit', linked to pragmatic proposals for reform. Whether one agrees or not, this slim and readable volume is required reading for anyone seriously concerned about the constitutional future and political legitimacy of Europe."
Andrew Moravcsik, Princeton University

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780745658377
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 4/23/2013
  • Series: PWWS - Polity Whats Wrong Series
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 232
  • File size: 2 MB

Table of Contents

List of Abbreviations.

Preface.

1. Introduction.

2. Why the European Union is More Necessary than Ever.

PART I: THE DIAGNOSIS.

3. Policy Gridlock.

4. Lack of Popular Legitimacy.

5. A Democratic Deficit.

PART II: THE CURE.

6. The Case for ‘Limited Democratic Politics’ in the EU.

7. How the EU is Ready for Limited Democratic Politics.

8. Encouraging Democratic Politics in the EU.

9. A Scenario: The 2009 European Commission President Contest.

10. Conclusion and Response to Potential Critiques.

References

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2008

    Unconvincing defence of the European Union

    Simon Hix is the Professor of European and Comparative Politics at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He chaired a working group for the Cabinet Office during the Convention drawing up the EU Constitution. Hix sees three problems with the EU: policy gridlock, lack of popular legitimacy and the democratic deficit. He notes, ¿In substantive terms ¿ the EU is closer to a form of enlightened despotism than a genuine democracy.¿ Yet he calls its political design `pure genius¿. He also thinks that ¿the US has an ideal political-economic model¿, which gives some idea of his political nous. In response to the EU¿s problems, he proposes to change the European Parliament¿s procedures for choosing its president and committee chairs, to make the Council¿s proceedings more open to the public, and to have a more open contest for the Commission¿s president. He explains patronisingly that through these reforms, ¿citizens will begin to understand and engage with EU politics.¿ He also mentions that the EU is `a driving force of global economic and political integration¿. He calls for the liberalisation of labour markets, welfare states, public services and energy industries, although he admits `the downward pressures on public spending, corporate tax rates and wages that result from market integration and liberalisation¿. He notes, ¿one group in society that has benefited enormously from European integration is the economic, political and social elite.¿ His proposed reforms completely ignore these economic realities, but these, not the EU¿s institutional failings, explain why public support for the EU has fallen since the early 1990s to just 50% across the EU and 30% in Britain. Hix rejects the Lisbon Treaty, writing that ¿the new treaty reforms are unlikely to bring the EU closer to the citizens, and may even undermine the legitimacy of the EU further if a second attempt to ratify a new treaty is rejected. And, even if the new treaty is ratified and eventually enters into force, the minor institutional changes are not significant enough to enable the EU to overcome policy gridlock or make the EU more democratically accountable.¿ But his minor procedural changes would do no better. Of course, like all EU fans, he opposes referendums, calling them `a crude and ineffectual mechanism for expressing citizens¿ preferences on policy issues¿. Hardly ineffectual - the Irish No to the Lisbon Treaty indeed `undermined the legitimacy of the EU¿ - in fact it has changed everything.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)