When Can You Trust the Experts: How to Tell Good Science from Bad in Education [NOOK Book]

Overview

Praise for When Can You Trust the Experts?

"For decades our nation's debates on education have obsessed over a small number of politicized hot buttons—charter schools, vouchers, class size, teachers' unions—while chasing expensive fads of dubious value. What's missing is evidence on what works and what doesn't. At last we have a place to go: Dan Willingham's indispensable guide to fact and fiction in educational methods. Read it and buy copies for your children's teachers, principals, and school board ...

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When Can You Trust the Experts: How to Tell Good Science from Bad in Education

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Overview

Praise for When Can You Trust the Experts?

"For decades our nation's debates on education have obsessed over a small number of politicized hot buttons—charter schools, vouchers, class size, teachers' unions—while chasing expensive fads of dubious value. What's missing is evidence on what works and what doesn't. At last we have a place to go: Dan Willingham's indispensable guide to fact and fiction in educational methods. Read it and buy copies for your children's teachers, principals, and school board members."—Steven Pinker, Harvard College Professor of Psychology, Harvard University, and author, The Language Instinct and How the Mind Works

"Daniel Willingham tackles one of the most difficult—but least discussed—problems for educators: how to sort through the barrage of programs for sale and figure out what really works. Unlike other experts who try to persuade teachers to simply adopt their views, Willingham gives nonscientists the tools and knowledge they need to wade into the research and draw their own conclusions."—Randi Weingarten, president, American Federation of Teachers

"If Dan Willingham had written this book fifty years ago, American education would have been spared innumerable snake-oil peddlers, unkeepable promises, deceptive claims, and false panaceas along the path to better schools and greater learning. But he's delivered a marvelous guide for future excursions along that twisting path."—Chester E. Finn, Jr., president, Thomas B. Fordham Institute

"A distinguished scientist gets down to brass tacks in explaining how to judge the scientific claims invariably offered to support educational programs. This lively, readable book should be in the hands of every teacher, administrator, and policymaker."—E. D. Hirsch, author, What Your Kindergartner Needs to Know and What Your First Grader Needs to Know

"Willingham's When Can You Trust the Experts? provides teachers with an in-depth guide on how to parse the helpful from the abhorrent. With the plethora of education research today, teachers finally have a book that asks us to challenge the validity of current education products through a simplified scientific approach. Unlike other education research books, however, Willingham prefers to spark conversation and invite educators in."—Jose Vilson, middle school math instructor, New York City Schools

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118233276
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 6/20/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 825,222
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Daniel T. Willingham is professor of psychology at the University of Virginia. His bestselling book, Why Don't Students Like School?, was hailed as "a triumph" by The Washington Post and "brilliant analysis" by The Wall Street Journal; it is recommended by scores of education-related magazines and blogs and is published in ten languages. Willingham writes a regular column called "Ask the Cognitive Scientist" for the American Federation of Teachers' magazine, American Educator.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction: What Are You to Believe?

Part One Why We So Easily Believe Bad Science

Chapter 1 Why Smart People Believe Dumb Things

Chapter 2 Science and Belief: A Nervous Romance

Chapter 3 What Scientists Call Good Science

Chapter 4 How to Use Science

Part Two The Shortcut Solution

Chapter 5 Step One: Strip It and Flip It

Chapter 6 Step Two: Trace It

Chapter 7 Step Three: Analyze It

Chapter 8 Step Four: Should I Do It?

Endnotes

Index

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