When I Grow up: A Memoir

When I Grow up: A Memoir

3.6 3
by Juliana Hatfield
     
 

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Advance Praise for When I Grow Up

"An unusually candid and revealing portrait of an artist and unlikely rock star. In this thoughtful, highly readable, and sometimes painful memoir, Juliana Hatfield evokes both the everyday trials of the touring musician and the occasional moments of transcendence and connection that make it all worthwhile. Anyone interested in pop

Overview

Advance Praise for When I Grow Up

"An unusually candid and revealing portrait of an artist and unlikely rock star. In this thoughtful, highly readable, and sometimes painful memoir, Juliana Hatfield evokes both the everyday trials of the touring musician and the occasional moments of transcendence and connection that make it all worthwhile. Anyone interested in pop music, or curious about the pressures placed on women rockers, should read this book ."—Tom Perrotta, author of Little Children and The Abstinence Teacher

"Well written and heartfelt, When I Grow Up is a real pleasure. I have always loved Juliana Hatfield's music, and I've been intellectually curious about the woman behind the songs. I was thrilled to read more about her in her own words."—Janeane Garofalo

"There has never been a book like this. Juliana Hatfield reveals, with a unique emotional honesty and precision, the inner world of a rock artist. She writes like a dream and has a remarkable ability to convey details of the road, the muse, and the heart."—Danny Goldberg, author of Bumping Into Geniuses

"A candid and mordantly funny peek backstage at the true life of a passionate artist."—Janice Erlbaum, author of Girlbomb and Have You Found Her: A Memoir

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
From her humble beginnings as a Berklee College of Music piano student to her brief critical success in the 1990s alternative rock explosion to her latest side project, Some Girls, first-time author Hatfield chronicles more than three storied decades in professional music. Alternating between a present-day cross-country tour and recollections from earlier years, the result is a mixed, overstuffed bag. Hatfield, raised, trained and tested (first as pop trio Blake Babies) in Boston, charmingly recollects her experience as a serious female musician with no desire to appear sexualized before her audience; readers will cringe alongside her as she awkwardly rejects a hotel room photo-shoot suggestion: "Why did they always want me to jump up and down on the bed? Were photographers constantly nudging Kurt Cobain to jump up and down on beds?" Hatfield makes a compelling witness to the alternative rock boom ushered in by Nirvana's success, and is both lucid and thorough explaining the bureaucratic minutiae of the music industry's new world order, dominated by the massive influence of star-maker Clear Channel. As a writer, Hatfield is humble and personable, if at times tedious; a clunky, symbolic prologue-about being unable to buy a pre-show shot of Patron with her club-issued drink tickets-is an early indicator of the book's need for further edit. Still, fans of Hatfield's bratty, bedeviled pop stylings should enjoy these glimpses into her life.
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From the Publisher

* From her humble beginnings as a Berklee College of Music piano student to her brief critical success in the 1990s alternative rock explosion to her latest side project, Some Girls, first-time author Hatfield chronicles more than three storied decades in professional music. Alternating between a present-day cross-country tour and recollections from earlier years, the result is a mixed, overstuffed bag. Hatfield, raised, trained and tested (first as pop trio Blake Babies) in Boston, charmingly recollects her experience as a serious female musician with no desire to appear sexualized before her audience; readers will cringe alongside her as she awkwardly rejects a hotel room photo-shoot suggestion: “Why did they always want me to jump up and down on the bed? Were photographers constantly nudging Kurt Cobain to jump up and down on beds?” Hatfield makes a compelling witness to the alternative rock boom ushered in by Nirvana’s success, and is both lucid and thorough explaining the bureaucratic minutiae of the music industry’s new world order, dominated by the massive influence of star-maker Clear Channel. As a writer, Hatfield is humble and personable, if at times tedious; a clunky, symbolic prologue—about being unable to buy a pre-show shot of Patron with her club-issued drink tickets—is an early indicator of the book’s need for further edit. Still, fans of Hatfield’s bratty, bedeviled pop stylings should enjoy these glimpses into her life. (Sept.) (Publishers Weekly, October 13th, 2008)

""...a tour dairy-cum-memoir"" (The Guardian, October 30th 2008)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780470443347
Publisher:
Turner Publishing Company
Publication date:
11/03/2008
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
336
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Juliana Hatfield is a singer-songwriter who came to prominence in the 1980s as a member of the band Blake Babies. Her vocals have been praised as "bewitching" by the New York Times. Her latest album, How to Walk Away, was released in August 2008.

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When I Grow Up 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"When I Grow Up" is a detailed account of Hatfield's personal and professional life in a unique format. Chapters switch back and forth, from autobiographical stories to tales from the road with her all-girl band, "Some Girls." The highs and lows described even inspired some of Hatfield's music and lyrics. She covers her youth, rise to prominence, life on the road, anorexia, depression, relationships with bandmates, friends, family and ex-boyfriends and more. True to form, Hatfield downplays her positive attributes and doesn't pander to the reader with extravagance of any kind. There's no sugarcoating personal matters as she strives for personal improvement, hence the title, "When I Grow Up." For better or worse, this book is filled with revelations that will stick in your mind. Whether sharing funny, self-deprecating stories like having to pee in a cup since there's no access to the bathroom before showtime or facing deep emotional issues while on tour, Hatfield candidly describes a plethora of personal matters. You'll be brought into the life of a woman fighting her way through the male dominated trenches of Indie rock, but there's a lighter side as well. Hatfield's charming and creative personality is on full display. She has an amusing way of dealing with serious situations, which ends up being cute. A personal favorite, was her plot to get out of a major label contract. I found descriptions of her youth to be heartwarming as well. I especially loved reading about innocent questions she recalls asking her parents as a child. By the end, you can see how she's retained some of that innocence. Certain readers on Amazon have criticized Hatfield for being whiny or recounting supposedly unimportant details, without understanding Hatfield's intentions. When praising Henry Rollins' book, "Hallucinations of Grandeur," she stated, "I was so moved by it. It wasn't that the writing was so great, it was just that it was so honest. You look at this guy, he's this big tough guy. In his book you see how he's got all these feelings you wouldn't necessarily connect with his appearance. You know, he's sad. He talks about the rigors of being on the road. How people don't understand him. How the fans don't understand what its like to be on the road. Just to get inside his head. I thought it was a poignant look inside of a sensitive rockers head. I was really inspired by that book. I think that book inspired my book actually." In another interview during the release of this book, Hatfield said that she felt like a mere spectator as her career kicked into gear, which eventually prompted her to write a journal. Incidentally, keeping a journal during her tour with "Some Girls," made the chapters from the road possible. Reading "When I Grow Up" gives you an understanding of a very interesting and unique songstress more people should be aware of. Hatfield is fearless, modest, a tortured soul and true musician. I recommend this book on the basis that it's very honest and filled with so many emotions, highs and lows, small issues to huge catastrophes, which all tie into a woman who represents modern society and real musicians everywhere. I found the book to be about hope and finding your way through many of the things we seldom share with each other.
Repol More than 1 year ago
Nothing fancy just a woman, her guitar and her thoughts. Ms. Hatfield takes you on a journey of a cross country tour with all the fun and pain of how life is when you are known but not famously known. Thanks for writing it nice to see honesty in music with all the drama and still know you are not being Bull-S***ted.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago