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When It's Six O'Clock in San Francisco: A Trip Through Time Zones
     

When It's Six O'Clock in San Francisco: A Trip Through Time Zones

by Cynthia Jaynes Omololu, Randy DuBurke (Illustrator)
 

A lyrical multicultural picture book that introduces the concept of time zones.

As one little boy is eating breakfast in San Francisco, another kid in London is playing football with his mates, a girl in Harare is eating dinner with her family, and another child in Sydney is calling for a drink of water in the middle of the night. Poetic language and charming

Overview


A lyrical multicultural picture book that introduces the concept of time zones.

As one little boy is eating breakfast in San Francisco, another kid in London is playing football with his mates, a girl in Harare is eating dinner with her family, and another child in Sydney is calling for a drink of water in the middle of the night. Poetic language and charming vignettes simplify the concept of time zones by providing glimpses into the everyday lives of children around the world.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“[A] lively contemporary picture book that talks about the scientific facts of time zones and what they mean in daily life. . . . A great choice for science classes and today's international families.”—Booklist

Children's Literature - Summer Whiting
This story begins at 6:00 AM in San Francisco, California. Jared wakes up to his mother calling for him to eat breakfast. We learn that when it is 6:00 AM in San Francisco, it is 9:00 AM in Montreal. We are introduced to Genevieve and her father as they are making their way along an icy sidewalk. It is time for school. Small clocks are located on the bottom of the page which allows the reader to see the time difference between the two cities. Santiago, Chile, is next. Elena and Maria, who have already been in school for several hours, are passing notes. Again we see small clocks on the bottom of the page that display the time in San Francisco, Montreal, and Santiago. Throughout the story, we visit London, Cape Town, Lahore, Beijing, Sydney, and Honolulu. In each city, the reader is given a glimpse of that particular culture. In Santiago, the students are playing soccer. A father is getting ready to surf in Honolulu. A small boy is riding on a bicycle with his father in Beijing. This delightful multicultural story would make an excellent addition to a primary classroom. Not only is it useful in teaching about diverse cultures, it would be a perfect literary connection to the time unit in grades 3-4. Once students are comfortable with telling time, they will be able to calculate the difference in time zones. There is factual information in the back of the book that covers the use of the sun dial, the necessity of time zones, and the reason behind the changing seasons. This would also make an excellent social studies supplement, as the continents and oceans are displayed beautifully. The illustrations, which were completed in pen, ink and acrylic, are alluring and charismatic. Reviewer:Summer Whiting
School Library Journal
Gr 2–4—Omololu has put a child-friendly face on a somewhat abstract concept. While Jared shivers on rising from his bed at 6:00 A.M. in San Francisco, Genevieve emerges from the Metro on her way to school in Montréal, where it is 9:00 A.M. The author describes children engaged in other activities around the world at the same time, from an evening meal in Lahore, Pakistan, to a sunrise in Honolulu, Hawaii. Each spread is labeled with the place name and time of that scene. All of DuBurke's impresssionistic pen-and-ink and acrylic illustrations depict children interacting with friends and/or parents. Many of the pictures are framed in white and appear below the text. A series of analog clocks depicting the time in other locales runs along the bottom of the spreads. A simple map of the 24 time zones accompanies a brief explanation of the history of timekeeping and the reason for these zones. There are few books for children about this specific topic, and this one adequately covers the concept.—Lisa Crandall, formerly at Capital Area District Library, Holt, MI
Kirkus Reviews
Omololu introduces the concept of time zones by depicting the slice-of-life activities of nine families in ten global cities. When Jared wakes in the titular city at 6:00, Genevieve is on her way to school at 9:00 in Montreal and Oliver, in London, plays soccer with classmates at 2:00 p.m. Rashida's family in Lahore eats spicy dal for supper, while Min-Yue and his parents bike home at 10:00 p.m. in Beijing's February cold. Numerical clocks for each city aggregate on successive spreads, and aftermatter includes a world map with the 24 time zones and brief historical and geographical information. Alternating between sequential panels and full-bleed spreads, DuBurke's acrylics convey both cross-cultural unity and variations. However, paintings vary in technical skill, with some facial portrayals lacking consistency between panels. The authorial choice to create stories in each time zone rather opting for a more abbreviated treatment results in a regrettably overlong text. A serviceable treatment of the topic, useful for classrooms and families. (Picture book. 5-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618768271
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
07/20/2009
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
736,819
Product dimensions:
7.75(w) x 10.75(h) x 0.31(d)
Lexile:
AD720L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
“[A] lively contemporary picture book that talks about the scientific facts of time zones and what they mean in daily life. . . . A great choice for science classes and today's international families.”—Booklist

Meet the Author


Cynthia Jaynes Omololu writes picture books, young adult novels, and everything in between. She lives with her family in Northern California.

Randy Du Burke has illustrated several picture books and is a recipient of the Coretta Scott King John Steptoe New Talent Award. He has also created art for D.C. and Marvel comics, The New York Times, and MTV animation. Randy lives with his family in Switzerland.

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