When Lulu Went to the Zoo

When Lulu Went to the Zoo

5.0 1
by Andy Ellis
     
 

When little Lulu gets an idea, watch out! After a chat with the animals at the zoo, she sneaks all of the animals into her house, where “there’s room for you all, from elephant to mouse.” Or so she thinks, until she tries to fit a bear into the bathtub...

Before the zookeepers can bring the animals back to the zoo, though, bold Lulu dreams up a

Overview

When little Lulu gets an idea, watch out! After a chat with the animals at the zoo, she sneaks all of the animals into her house, where “there’s room for you all, from elephant to mouse.” Or so she thinks, until she tries to fit a bear into the bathtub...

Before the zookeepers can bring the animals back to the zoo, though, bold Lulu dreams up a new place for her animal friends to live. And four–year–olds can be very persuasive.

Children will love this rollicking, read–aloud tale matched by hilarious illustrations.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Sarah Maury Swan
Lulu learns from the animals in the zoo that they would rather not be in cages. So she takes them home with her. Unfortunately, her plan does not work out very well, since it is hard to keep food in the refrigerator when the penguins and seals and other cold loving animals are living there. And where do you find room for an elephant's trunk and giraffe's neck in a house? Lulu convinces the zoo keeper her new found friends would like a place where they can feel free to do what they are supposed to do. A place called Lululand. She visits them whenever she wants and plays all day but sometimes—when no-one is looking—Lulu invites her friends home for a picnic dinner. Cute story with lively and whimsical illustrations but, being the Nervous Nellie type, I worry a child might try sneaking into an animal's cage at the zoo. Still the book does send a nice message that wild animals should not be caged. Reviewer: Sarah Maury Swan
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—Ellis's engaging illustrations outshine the text in this uninspired offering. Lulu, who is "two times two," goes to the zoo, decides that the animals should be free, and sneaks them all home to live with her. But it's an impractical solution, and the zookeepers find them. She convinces them that the animals should go live in Lululand, "a place where each of the animals had oodles of space." The story lacks subtlety as well as logic. The text does not scan well, the rhymes strain with words like "saw" and "door" paired, and the page turns are awkwardly paced. The plot is thin at best. The idea of a child realizing that zoo animals should be free is a worthy one, but the far-fetched, almost magical solution here detracts from the seriousness of the issue. All of this is unfortunate, because the artwork is really worth the time. Lulu, a genial tyke, is expressive in her cartoonish simplicity, and the appealing animals are easily identifiable and cuddly, yet not overly cute. The pictures are packed with humorous details that would keep little ones turning back. However, none of this is enough to save the pedestrian text.—Amy Lilien-Harper, The Ferguson Library, Stamford, CT
Publishers Weekly
Four-year-old Lulu becomes sad when visiting the zoo: “The tigers were crying really big tears/ and the life had gone out of the llamas' ears.” Conversations with the animals confirm her belief that they don't belong in cages; penguins dream of dancing on icebergs and a flamingo longs to fly in the sky. She brings the menagerie to her house, where they play dressup, ride a scooter, and gather in the bathroom “for a lovely hot wash./ But the bear in the bathtub was a bit of a squash.” When zookeepers arrive to retrieve the animals, Lulu explains, “they just want to be free,” and imagines a place called Lululand, where they can cavort in the wild. However, that fantasy disappears as quickly as it's introduced: the animals are ostensibly returned to the zoo, and she continues to sneak them out “on warm, moonlit nights.” Ellis's (Scaredy Dog!) angular watercolors offer some comical details—deer antlers come in handy for stringing party lights at the festive “midnight snack” finale—but while Lulu's story has heart, its message is muddled. Ages 4–9. (Mar.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761354994
Publisher:
Lerner Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/01/2010
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.20(w) x 10.70(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD720L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

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When Lulu Went to the Zoo 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
BookReviewer-SFCM More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by: Debbie Smart When Lulu went to the Zoo is a story written in fun rhyme about a little girl's trip to the zoo. While Lulu is at the zoo she chats with the animals as the animals tell her they want to be free. So one night she sneaks all the animals out of the zoo and brings them to her house to live. She tells them, "there's room for you all, from elephant to mouse." But she soon realizes there is not room for all. In fact, there is no place for food because "the fridge was too full of penguins and seals." Plus, Lulu finds it hard to keep all the zoo animals a secret from everyone. The zookeepers find Lulu and ask her to give all the animals back so they can put them to bed; however, Lulu has another idea for the zoo animals. So where will the animals go? Back to zoo? Or no? Andy Ellis has written and illustrated over fifty picture books. Readers will enjoy the illustrations in When Lulu went to the Zoo. They are colorful, delightful and entertaining on every page. Related websites: www.lernerbooks.com