When Mockingbirds Sing

( 14 )

Overview

What marks the boundary between a miracle from God and the imagination of a child?

Leah is a child from Away, isolated from her peers because of her stutter. But then she begins painting scenes that are epic in scope, brilliant in detail, and suffused with rich, prophetic imagery. When the event foreshadowed in the first painting dramatically comes true, the town of Mattingly takes notice.

Leah attributes her ability to foretell the future to ...

See more details below
Paperback
$12.82
BN.com price
(Save 19%)$15.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (34) from $1.99   
  • New (20) from $1.99   
  • Used (14) from $1.99   
When Mockingbirds Sing

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

What marks the boundary between a miracle from God and the imagination of a child?

Leah is a child from Away, isolated from her peers because of her stutter. But then she begins painting scenes that are epic in scope, brilliant in detail, and suffused with rich, prophetic imagery. When the event foreshadowed in the first painting dramatically comes true, the town of Mattingly takes notice.

Leah attributes her ability to foretell the future to an invisible friend she calls the Rainbow Man. Some of the townsfolk are enchanted with her. Others fear her. But there is one thing they all agree on—there is no such thing as the Rainbow Man.

Her father, the town psychologist, is falling apart over his inability to heal his daughter . . . or fix his marriage. And the town minister is unraveled by the notion that a mere child with no formal training may be hearing from God more clearly than he does.

While the town bickers over what to do with this strange child, the content of Leah’s paintings grows darker. Still, Leah insists that the Rainbow Man’s heart is pure. But then a dramatic and tragic turn of events leaves the town reeling and places everyone’s lives in danger. Now the people of Mattingly face a single choice:

Will they cling to what they know . . . or embrace the things Leah believes in that cannot be seen?

“Billy Coffey is a minstrel who writes with intense depth of feeling and vibrant rich description.” —Robert Whitlow, best-selling author of The Choice

Read More Show Less
  • When Mockingbirds Sing
    When Mockingbirds Sing  

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Tom and Ellen Norcross move to the fictional town of Mattingly, Va., for a fresh start after a slip of the tongue threatens their marriage and Tom’s psychology practice. A stutter ostracizes their only daughter, Leah, until Allie Granderson befriends her, a relationship that tests Allie as much as it grounds Leah. From a grandiose birthday celebration and budding friendships to death and despair, Coffey (Snow Day) stuffs a lot of life into a seven day time span. A range of complex, highly relatable characters is embedded in the story. These people are rooted in community, love their children well, and are satisfied with their views of who God is—and, perhaps more importantly, who God is not. When Leah’s imaginary friend, the Rainbow Man, gives her information that seemingly only God could know, it shakes folks up to the point that even Deacon Spicer wants to see the family run out of town. Whether Leah’s prophecies are of the devil or the divine is a question asked but not fully answered until the very end. This intriguing read challenges mainstream religious ideas of how God might be revealed to both the devout and the doubtful. Agent: Rachelle Gardner, Books & Such Literary Agency. (June 11)
Library Journal
Tom Norcross is having trouble with his marriage and his psychiatry practice so he moves his wife and their daughter, Leah, to Mattingly, VA. Because of her stutter, Leah is a social pariah until a young girl named Allie befriends her. But their friendship and the Norcrosses' new life in Mattingly is challenged when Leah claims her imaginary friend, the Rainbow Man, is instructing her to paint pictures that then come true. The townspeople are devout Christians, and their world is turned upside down by Leah's predictions. Is God speaking through her? Or is it something more sinister? VERDICT Coffey's third novel (after Paper Angels and Snow Day) is an inspirational and atmospheric tale that should appeal to readers of Penelope Stokes.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781401688219
  • Publisher: Nelson, Thomas, Inc.
  • Publication date: 6/11/2013
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 253,113
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Billy Coffey's critically acclaimed books combine rural Southern charm with a vision far beyond the ordinary. He is a regular contributor to several publications, where he writes about faith and life. Billy lives with his wife and two children in Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains. Visit him at www.billycoffey.com. Facebook: billycoffeywriter Twitter: @billycoffey

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 14 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 9, 2014

    I was sent this book to judge it for a contest, so I had no idea

    I was sent this book to judge it for a contest, so I had no idea what to expect. It was wonderful. The characters were real and unique. The plot was so completely unexpected that from the first few pages, I knew I had to finish it to find out what was going to happen. I had hoped to discover what the story of the hole was all about, so now it looks like I'll have to buy Coffey's other book about Mattingley to solve that little mystery. I highly recommend this one.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2014

    Unexpected turns...

    I could not put his book down. I love it when novels make you think, and it constantly had me in debate. My heart was torn one way and then another. I shared the various thoughts and feelings of each character. I feel this is a very spiritual read. I highly recomend it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2013

    Engaging read

    This was a deeply moving read for me. I found myself relating directly with many of the characters in spite of their diversity. Id say it will be a challenging read for individuals with history in a legalistc church environment - trust me, but highly recommended!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 5, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    'When Mockingbirds Sing' is a beautiful and thought provoking Ch

    'When Mockingbirds Sing' is a beautiful and thought provoking Christian fiction novel that tells the story of Leah and her invisible friend. At first nobody pays much attention to Leah's friend, until he helps her upset the calm of the new town she and her family have moved to. When Leah paints a picture that contains the winning numbers for a lottery, people in the town begin to speculate that she may be either a prophet or a threat. Leah's father - an agnostic - clashes with the town's pastor and his ideas about Leah and her prophecies. Soon things take a turn for the worse when Leah's imaginary friend predicts danger coming and people begin to doubt the truth behind her so called prophecies. When a severe storm blows into town on the day of their annual carnival, the people of Mattingly and Leah's family must decide between what they can see and what they know or accept and embrace Leah and her prophecies.

    This book was very unique from anything else I've read lately. Although it's classified as Christian fiction, the book doesn't have a ton of religious beliefs stuffed within its pages and it didn't sound preachy at all. The story is an amazing and curious one - the kind that makes you question what you would do in that situation and if you would have the courage - the faith - required to believe. Leah is an intriguing main character - she's just a girl, but she's brave and speaks up when she needs to; even when people are judging her and trying to prove she's making things up. Her faith as a child reflects the innocent nature we all lose with time and how we should all strive to regain that kind of faith in every aspect of our lives. The plot was captivating in every aspect - the small town with the various townspeople, Leah and her family, the troubled past they've had, and the strange yet wondrous experiences that Leah brings to them all. It deals with some really important topics that we can all relate to: family, faith, hope, friendship, community, and love. Highly recommended for fans of Christian fiction and those looking for a story full of hope and something to reflect on.

    Disclosure: I received a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 27, 2013

    When Mockingbirds Sing is a dark and complex story about a littl

    When Mockingbirds Sing is a dark and complex story about a little girl name Leah and her new friend the Rainbow Man. The book takes place over one week leading up to the town carnival. It starts on Saturday which is little Leah's birthday. Leah Norcross is a shy and somewhat strange girl whose family just moved to the town of Mattingly from Away (the city). Her father is a psychologist and her mother stays home with Leah. The Rainbow Man appears at that birthday party.
    The story takes off from there and gets darker and darker. The various characters and their viewpoints make it a well-rounded and complete story. The town of Mattingly is full of interesting people and its members know about the magic. Has the magic found Leah or she just making it up? Should the town believe what she has to say? Does the Rainbow Man exist? 
    This book was intriguing on so many different levels. There were many secrets between the characters which gave it a level of mystery that kept me reading. I found myself pulled in deeper and deeper as the characters lives changed more and more. Many had to figure out who they were and the process was gut wrenchingly honest and provoking. 
    I definitely recommend that you read this book. It will help you figure out yourself and what you believe. I kept wondering how I would react if I lived in Mattingly. Would I accept what Leah had to say or would I find myself trying to get rid of her. Read this book. Just do it.
    This book was provided to me by the publisher in exchange for a review. All opinions are my own. I really like this book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 26, 2013

    From the innocence of little Leah to outrage you feel through th

    From the innocence of little Leah to outrage you feel through the township of Mattingly, you will quickly find yourself entranced by the story. A classic worthy of five stars in my book. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 4, 2013

    I've read all of Billy Coffey's books, but I have to say, "

    I've read all of Billy Coffey's books, but I have to say, "When Mockingbirds Sing" is my favorite so far. As a person who has
    struggled with doubt and wrestled with faith most of my life, this book spoke to me deeply. I could see myself in the
    skeptical "spiritual-but-not-religious" Tom and Ellen for sure, but I also found hope and comfort in the characters of the young girls,
     Leah and Allie. Their faith, not only in God but in each other, was refreshingly pure. I particularly loved Leah's sweet innocence,
    and how Billy masterfully aligned that with the firecracker vigor of Allie. The two together made a perfect team.
     I was also glad that the pastor turned out to be one of the most skeptical characters in the book, at least when it came to his
    ability to believe in the Rainbow Man, Leah's vision of God. The Rainbow Man didn't fit the pastor's definition of God, and thus,
    the pastor refused to accept that He was real. I suspect that example rings true for many of us.

    As others have said in the reviews here, Billy Coffey is a gifted storyteller. He has a brilliant command of language, and his
    prose flows smoothly and easily. This book is a page-turner. The plot moves along well, and there is a sense of anticipation
    that kept this reader turning pages long into the night.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2013

    Having read both of Billy's other books (Snow Day and Paper Ange

    Having read both of Billy's other books (Snow Day and Paper Angels), I was delighted to go back to the fictitious town of Mattingly...but I was also surprised. Surprised by the way each trip to Mattingly brought with it a little more of the extraordinary than one might expect to find in such an ordinary small town...surprised at the mystery and the `maybe' found with the turn of each page. Pages which, I might add, turned at an alarming rate, try though I did to slow them down.

    Mystery and maybe are possibly two words not typically associated with a book about faith - even a work of fiction. But, to me, they are true and honest and at the very crux of the matter. I think we choose faith because of them both, choosing the constancy of it when we realize there is no constant to be found that's birthed from this world. Possibly my favorite thing about this book is how it examines just about every approach to faith there is, through each of the town's colorful residents, and how they relate with one another through those belief systems. I was able to connect with just about every one of them on some level (as I daresay could every reader), seeing true colors drop masks when the landscape began to rapidly shift around them. As is so true in life, it's the mystery and the maybe that bring revelation in the end.

    You're going to want to visit Mattingly yourself. And it's possible, when you do, that you'll hear Billy's name and work tossed around comparatively with such company as Stephen King and Frank Peretti. While he's certainly deserving, I think you'll find his work distinctly his own, a fresh Southern story teller with a keen eye for looking at all sides of a thing, and pointing out the special light.

    This one is a book you don't want to miss!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 11, 2013

    Some people are given a gift for storytelling, and Billy Coffey

    Some people are given a gift for storytelling, and Billy Coffey is one of those people. I discovered Billy's writing first through his blog. When Mockingbirds Sing is the first of his fiction works that I've read. It is a keeper!

    I won't give a story summary - others have done that already, and have done it well. I will say that I fell in love with the characters, especially Leah and Allie. What I wouldn't give for the chance to spend the afternoon with little Allie! The way she views the world and expresses herself reminded me so much of Scout from To Kill a Mockingbird. (And since TKAM is one of my favorite books ever, that is high praise!)

    I will say that if you've ever been from "Away" and tried to fit into a new place, if you've ever tried to live into the "Maybe" of life and faith, if you've ever struggled with doubt, if you've ever wondered who God might be able to use and how, then this book is for you. The characters are real and lovable, the town of Mattingly is strangely familiar to anyone who has lived in a small town (especially in the South), and the story - refusing to take easy roads or to tie up endings in neat bows - rings true.

    I was provided a copy of this book by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own. I am not compensated for any of my reviews. In light of all of that, I still say - read it! You will love it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 11, 2013

    Thomas Nelson, the publishers of Billy Coffey's latest novel Whe

    Thomas Nelson, the publishers of Billy Coffey's latest novel When Mockingbirds Sing begin their description of the story with this line:
    "
    What marks the boundary between a miracle from God and the imagination of a child?"

    In this new novel, Billy Coffey introduces us to a world of faith, doubt and God's mysterious ways, seen through the eyes of a lonely child.  Leah believes in "the maybe" and has to face the sad truth that many people around do not.  When she begins painting prophetic pictures the town begins to swirl.

    As he weaves threads of lives together into a stunning whole, Billy holds up a mirror that reflects not only our faces but our hearts.  I'd like to think that my faith is strong, but like the people of Mattingly, I admit that I too can waver when I see things I don't quite understand.

    I will not share more because I fear spoiling the story, but I encourage you to take a journey to Mattingly, to meet all the people dwelling there, including The Rainbow Man.  If you are anything like me, you will smile, you will weep, spend some time on your knees and then you'll hunger for more.

    I was given a complimentary copy of this novel.  The opinions I have expressed are my own.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 10, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    When Mockingbirds Sing By: Billy Coffey Faith, sacrifice, hope,

    When Mockingbirds Sing
    By: Billy Coffey

    Faith, sacrifice, hope, and loss are major elements in this story. The Rainbow Man speaks to Leah Norcross, a child. He sings to her and tells her to draw pictures. Why can’t anyone else see him? Can you believe something you can’t see? What if someone draws a picture? Does that make it any more real? Leah tries hard to make the people of Mattingly understand something is happening, but they won’t listen. They try to run her and her family out of town because of Leah’s drawings that she says the Rainbow Man told her to draw.
    Leah’s first drawing foretells something happening, and it comes to pass. The town minister, Reggie Goggins, fears God is speaking to her instead of through him. Then, her second drawing is filled with so much darkness, people don’t know whether to believe her, fear her, or dismiss her view of the future.
    Once you start this book, you won’t be able to put it down. You won’t even remember you’re reading a book. I felt like I was watching a Hitchcock or Stephen King movie. The characters come to life on the page and wrap you up in their story. Barney Moore and his wife Mabel are the first to experience Leah’s foretelling. But since that came true, does that mean the darkness in the second drawing will come true as well?
    Leah’s father, Tom Norcross, doesn’t believe in God, but then he sees something happen right before his eyes that makes him know Leah is telling the truth. But, how do you convince others of something they are afraid of, can’t see, and don’t want to hear about? Sometimes it’s the littlest among us that have the most faith. See how Leah changes a town with her faith while they suffer loss as the destruction engulfs them. Will the sacrifices some of the town members have to make give room to the faith they will need to overcome?
    Is the Rainbow Man God-like or is he something else? You’ll have to read the book to find out! I look forward to reading more stories by Billy Coffey! This was a great read and a definite read for anyone who loves suspense-filled novels with real characters and vivid descriptions.
    I received this book free from Thomas Nelson in exchange for an honest review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 10, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    By SuzyQ620:  Do you believe in Magic? The town of Mattingly, V


    By SuzyQ620:  Do you believe in Magic? The town of Mattingly, Virginia has one week to find out if little Leah Norcross has a divine touch or is touched by devilry.
    Leah’s birthday gift from her parents brings her artistic voice to the attention of all of Mattingly and turns the town and it’s people upside down—even the town’s preacher.
    How will her father’s lack of faith be affected by his own daughter and the Rainbow Man? How have the lives of so many been brought together and changed to reveal their true hearts?
    Time is running out for the town of Mattingly—the dark wings of Mockingbirds approach and their cries are deafening!
    Thomas Nelson Publishers provided this book to me, but because I was very familiar with Billy and his writing, I couldn’t wait to read it!  Billy’s blog has captivated me for a long time and his first book, Snow Days was terrific.  Billy Coffey’s novel, When Mockingbirds Sing holds your attention from the very first page—it has been said he is a minstrel—and he is—singing a riveting story of faith vs. doubt. Which side are you on? 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)