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When Night Eats the Moon
     

When Night Eats the Moon

by Joanne Findon
 
Holly feels rejected. Her cool, remote mother has dumped the thirteen-year-old on an aunt and uncle she barely knows, at a farm in southern England. Holly takes her flute to her aunt and uncle's old barn, and the notes of her instrument set off a mysterious hum from the back of the building. Perhaps she shouldn't have gone to investigate the sounds. Maybe she

Overview

Holly feels rejected. Her cool, remote mother has dumped the thirteen-year-old on an aunt and uncle she barely knows, at a farm in southern England. Holly takes her flute to her aunt and uncle's old barn, and the notes of her instrument set off a mysterious hum from the back of the building. Perhaps she shouldn't have gone to investigate the sounds. Maybe she shouldn't have moved the pile of broken-down farm implements that blocked her path. But how else was she going to get that ancient-looking door open? Besides, somehow Holly can't help herself.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
When Holly's parents go off on a vacation in an attempt to repair their marriage, she is left with her aunt and uncle on their farm in southern England. Thirteenyear-old Holly is miserable. She hates her cousin, Frederick, who is grumpy and does not care much for Holly either. Although her aunt and uncle try to be nice to her, Frederick treats her as though she does not exist. Disliking her few options for company, she begins to spend time alone. Holly sulks off to the barn to play her flute, and suddenly she is swept into the past where at first she is still unhappy. She is eventually drawn into the problems of the people of the Iron Age, who believe she will save them from the marauding Celts. Each time Holly begins to feel close to a solution, however, she is abruptly pulled back into the present. It turns out that some stone jars hidden in the barn contain the pieces of time that draw Holly to the past. When Holly takes Frederick into the past with her, they engineer peace between the two factions and return to the present as the best of friends. This story has great potential. Unfortunately it becomes a clone of almost every timetravel novel ever written. Better introductions to time travel are Kit Pearson's A Handful of Time (Viking, 1988), Ruth Park's Playing Beatie Bow (Atheneum, 1982, (c) 1980), or Diana Wynne Jones's The Time of the Ghost (Greenwillow, 1996/VOYA April 1997). VOYA CODES: 3Q 3P M J (Readable without serious defects; Will appeal with pushing; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9). 1999, Red Deer Press, Ages 12 to 15, 176p, $7.95 Trade pb. Reviewer: Marlyn Roberts
Children's Literature
Holly, spending time reluctantly with relatives in southern England while her parents sort out their relationship back in Canada, stumbles upon a mystery in an old barn. Findon employs venerable fantasy traditions (a giver of gifts, the magical power of music), to launch her young heroine into Iron Age Stonehenge. In the process of saving people she comes to love, she finds linkages between herself and her mother, and between the present and the past, all steps along the way in a journey of personal discovery. The young protagonist is believable and the setting is competently sketched, with vivid images of cream tea and of the famous prehistoric site. All in all, despite the dream sequences feeling patched on, the story moves with a clever twist to a satisfying resolution. 2000, Red Deer Press, . Ages 8 to 12. Reviewer: Uma Krishnaswami
KLIATT
Thirteen-year-old Holly is stuck with relatives for the summer while her parents work out their problems. She is sent to live with a family in Southern England whose teenage son had been expecting to travel during the summer and not entertain his long-lost cousin. Holly, a talented musician, occupies her time by practicing her flute in an old barn. She is magically transported back to 700 BC when Iron Age people were settling in the region of Stonehenge, England. The people from the past think that Holly was sent to prevent the Celts from conquering them. This is a fantasy that will beguile readers. It is a definite pleaser for Harry Potter fans who cannot get their Potter fix fast enough. It also fits well into the middle school curriculum and would make a great read-aloud for 6th graders. KLIATT Codes: J—Recommended for junior high school students. 1999, Red Deer Press, 175p, 22cm, $7.95. Ages 13 to 15. Reviewer: Sherri Forgash Ginsberg; Duke School for Children, Chapel Hill, NC, September 2000 (Vol. 34 No. 5)
Midwest Book Review
Thirteen-year-old Holly's cool, remote mother has left her at a farm in southern England with an aunt and uncle she barely knows, and a grumpy cousin Frederick who pestered her incessantly. In a fit of defiance Holly takes her flute to her aunt and uncle's old barn to practice. But the notes of her instrument set off a mysterious hum from the back of the building. Before she understands what's happening, Holly is transported to 700 BCE, when Iron Age people were settling in the region of Stonehenge. They seem to think Holly is a warrior come to save them from the marauding Celts! As she encounters danger and mystery, Holly learns that everything is somehow connected and she must find out how before it's too late! When Night Eats The Moon is a simply terrific fantasy novel for ages 10 to 14.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780889952126
Publisher:
Fitzhenry & Whiteside, Limited
Publication date:
09/10/2002
Series:
Northern Lights Young Novels
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
5.58(w) x 8.46(h) x 0.47(d)
Age Range:
9 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

The author of the powerful young adult fantasy novel, When Night Eats the Moon, is Joanne Findon, Celtic scholar and university lecturer. She has had a fascination for Stonehenge since she first saw photographs of it as a child. "I have returned [to Stonehenge a number of times, but my last trip was the most powerful because I walked there from the town of Amesbury. . . . Even with the fence around it, this monument is still a powerful sight."

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