When the Cows Got Loose

( 1 )

Overview

While Ida Mae's busy daydreaming 'bout how to get famous, her twenty-six cows are busy flying the coop. Now it's up to Ida Mae and her trusty dog Calliope, to rustle up that herd of loitering livestock. 'Cause it's the only after each of those cavorting cows is corralled that Ida Mae can finally get back to the task at hand ā€” making her own dreams come true.

Carol Weis makes a stellar debut as she joins New York Times bestselling artist Ard Hoyt in a lively tale where one ...

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Overview

While Ida Mae's busy daydreaming 'bout how to get famous, her twenty-six cows are busy flying the coop. Now it's up to Ida Mae and her trusty dog Calliope, to rustle up that herd of loitering livestock. 'Cause it's the only after each of those cavorting cows is corralled that Ida Mae can finally get back to the task at hand ā€” making her own dreams come true.

Carol Weis makes a stellar debut as she joins New York Times bestselling artist Ard Hoyt in a lively tale where one determined girl tracks down twenty-six bovines and discovers the answer to her dreams right outside her own back door.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-This unusual tale mixes circus scenery and characters with a familiar barnyard theme. On the day the cows get loose, Ida Mae is hanging upside down in an apple tree, "dreamin' about how to git famous." Pa asks her to find their 26 roaming bovines, and, although Ida Mae rights herself to start her search, the story continues to feel topsy-turvy. The animals' names span from A to Z, but the cows are not listed or discovered in alphabetical order. In fact, it is difficult to know when all the missing animals are found. Rendered in a combination of watercolor, colored pencil, and pen and ink, the energetic illustrations add to the chaos. From the front cover to the back, cows practically jump off the pages, performing circuslike antics such as juggling, flying on trapezes, and walking a tightrope. Ida Mae's family and neighbors are equally unconventional. She lives in a dilapidated trailer "Fun House," rides a plumed zebra, and visits a bearded lady and a fire-swallowing man during the roundup. At story's end, she can finally see her way to fame, envisioning "Ida Mae's Bovine Big Top." The busy illustrations and zany action will have some readers reeling in confusion, while others will be reeling with laughter. A selection best suited for individual or one-to-one reading.-Carolyn Janssen, Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, OH Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Similar in premise to Tres Seymour's Hunting the White Cow (1993), but far from that tale's delicate serenity, this wild romp pits young Ida Mae against no fewer than 26 strayed cattle-each portrayed as a different breed in Hoyt's broadly comic scenes. So where have those bumptious bovines gotten to? Though you'd barely know it from Ida Mae's irritated, country-cadenced commentary, everyone here, two-legged and four-, is a circus performer. Ida Mae's "farmhouse" is a rolling Fun House, she gets around atop a zebra, her Mom chops wood by throwing axes and the decidedly loose-jointed livestock have invaded the neighbors' yards to practice wire-walking, chair-balancing and other acrobatic acts. By the end, the errant have been coaxed back to home pastures, and Ida Mae is left in her favorite position-hanging upside down from a tree limb-dreaming of bovines beneath the Big Top. Further proof that cows are funny; young audiences will line up for return admission to this show. (Picture book. 6-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689851667
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
  • Publication date: 7/11/2006
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 1,054,455
  • Age range: 3 - 6 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.30 (w) x 12.10 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Carol Weis is a former teacher, actor, school librarian, and pastry chef who writes poetry, essays, and commentary for public radio. Inspiration for this story came after she and her daughter, Maggie, watched cows from a nearby farm roam the neighborhood for what seemed like days, after escaping the confines of their cozy corral. Their hooves made deep impressions in the lawn, ever reminding her of the book that begged to be written. Carol lives in Southampton, Massachusetts. This is her first children's book.

Ard Hoyt has illustrated a number of books, including the New York Times bestsellers Iā€™m a Manatee by John Lithgow and The Hair of Zoe Fleefenbacher Goes to School by Laurie Halse Anderson. Ard lives with his wife and five daughters in Bentonville, Arkansas.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 1, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    An hysterical adventure kids will love

    Quick! Do something! The cows have gotten loose and we need to catch them! So begins Carol Weis' delightful story When The Cows Got Loose.

    It was a typical day down at the zoo (or is it a farm?) when the cows escaped. Granny was soaking in the tub, Grampy was knitting a scarf, Ma was chopping wood and Pa was fixing a hole in the chicken coop. Ida Mae was the busiest of all that day - she was hanging upside down from a tree daydreaming. When her father decides Ida Mae should capture the rogue cows, the young girl gathers up her dog Calliope, hops aboard her trusty zebra, and begins her search.

    Ida Mae finds her 26 missing cows in the strangest, and funniest, of places. One cow has taken a neighbor's chairs, pilled them high, and climbed to the top. Several other bovines are discovered playing inside a car, high atop a tree, while still others are tiptoeing across a clothesline, dressed in the clean sheets that had hung on the clothesline just moments before.

    Children will giggle in glee and laugh out loud at the cows' antics. The expressions on the cows' faces are priceless as are their silly escapades. The story is told from Ida Mae's point of view and the author cleverly uses down home lingo - "The day the cows got loose, I was hanging upside down in the ol' apple tree, dreamin' about how to git famous someday" - that opens up all sorts of opportunities for the reader to improvise and use all sorts of funny and entertaining voices.

    Quill says: The day the Cows Got Loose led to one hysterical and not-to-be-missed adventure that children will love to go on again and again.

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