When the Library Lights Go Out

( 2 )

Overview

When the library lights go out, that means it’s time for three story-hour puppets to begin their adventures! At first only Rabbit and Lion come out to play and explore their library home. But where is their friend Hermit Crab? Where could she be in the library darkness? In this charming story, come along with Rabbit, Lion, and Hermit Crab as they play, draw, and explore their way through the library—and find out what really happens when the library lights go out!

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Overview

When the library lights go out, that means it’s time for three story-hour puppets to begin their adventures! At first only Rabbit and Lion come out to play and explore their library home. But where is their friend Hermit Crab? Where could she be in the library darkness? In this charming story, come along with Rabbit, Lion, and Hermit Crab as they play, draw, and explore their way through the library—and find out what really happens when the library lights go out!

When the lights go out in the library, the storytime puppets set out on an adventure to find their missing friend, Hermit Crab.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
When the library lights go out, the stuffed animals in the lost-and-found box come alive. While it is not an original idea to find toys awakening when everyone else is asleep, a library is an unusual setting. A floppy-eared rabbit and a friendly lion set out hand in hand to find their lost friend, the hermit crab. Fearing a giant around every corner, they suspect the potted plant is the giant's beanstalk and the blue rug is his bathtub. When the friendly pair rips a map that was supposed to tell them how to go home, they do not despair but turn the paper scraps into a hat and a boat. At last they find their friend and feast together on a leftover lunch. There is a lot for young minds to absorb here about imagination, looking out for friends, and not getting too scared of the unknown. The illustrations are a delight—young readers might think the soft folds of the stuffed animals could roll right off the page into their arms. It is a perfect bedtime story but also just right for a preschool storytime to make the library seem a very cozy place indeed. 2005, Atheneum, Ages 3 to 6.
—Karen Leggett
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-Three puppets enjoy a nighttime adventure in a library after hours. Amiable and amusing full-page illustrations, done in oils on paper, capture a sense of being alone in a big space and convey the warmth of wood tables and shelves full of books, but the text provides only an impressionistic and sketchy plot. Hermit Crab is missing from the puppet box after the librarian leaves, and Rabbit, who has been steeped in fairy tales, decides that she has been taken by a giant. Lion, more stolid and practical, finds a map that seems to point to landmarks within the building, but it tears as the friends pull at it. Lion folds the pieces into a boat, a sail, a captain's hat. Endearing as these puppets are to look at, they are frustrating to read about. The story reads, even aloud, like one improvised with puppets in hand: long on action and dialogue but with too many moments that pull against the center. Some of the magical elements seem inconsistent as well: Lion and Rabbit can sail the paper boat across the floor in the moonlight (the clock), but then dine on the remains of a real baloney sandwich and toast marshmallows over a lit match (in the library!!!). Overall, an appealing concept that doesn't quite live up to its magical promise.-Kathie Meizner, Montgomery County Public Libraries, Chevy Chase, MD Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
After-hours in a library transforms into a magical time as the story puppets become animated. When Rabbit discovers Hermit Crab missing from their communal box, he coaxes sleepy Lion to help find him. The duo searches the library with the aid of maps, skirts dastardly giants and enjoys a "found" picnic harvested from the garbage bins. As Lion and Rabbit explore, ordinary objects become extraordinary pathways to adventure. There is a fluid interplay between the text and artwork. Tillotson's oil paintings expand upon the imaginative flights of fancy; everyday items cast appropriately eerie shadows through clever manipulations of their placement. She also reveals the practical origins of Rabbit and Lion's grandiose imaginings; a starry night sky turns out to be children's names written on suspended star cut-outs, etc. While obviously the size and format of a traditional picture book, the story is broken into titled segments and reads more like a truncated first-chapter book. Slightly challenging as a read-aloud for younger preschoolers, the tale is ideally suited for shared story time with an older audience. (Picture book. 4-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416980285
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 5/5/2009
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 225,034
  • Age range: 3 - 6 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.30 (w) x 11.80 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Megan McDonald

Megan McDonald won the IRA Award for Is This a House for Hermit Crab? Once a librarian herself, she is also the author of the bestselling Judy Moody books. She lives with her husband in California.

Katherine Tillotson illustrated Megan McDonald’s Penguin and Little Blue. She lives on a hill in San Francisco, California, with her husband and two dogs.

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Customer Reviews

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