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When the News Went Live: Dallas 1963
     

When the News Went Live: Dallas 1963

5.0 2
by Bob Huffaker, Bill Mercer, George Phenix, Wes Wise
 

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ISBN-10: 1589791398

ISBN-13: 9781589791398

Pub. Date: 12/15/2004

Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing

When routine coverage of JFK's Dallas visit suddenly evolved into reporting a worldwide tragedy, KRLD reporters assumed the duty of reassuring a shocked nation and an anxious world. Broadcast journalism came of age in that crisis, and KRLD News earned the profession's highest honor for its on-the-scene reporting. The writers worked in support of Dan Rather and

Overview

When routine coverage of JFK's Dallas visit suddenly evolved into reporting a worldwide tragedy, KRLD reporters assumed the duty of reassuring a shocked nation and an anxious world. Broadcast journalism came of age in that crisis, and KRLD News earned the profession's highest honor for its on-the-scene reporting. The writers worked in support of Dan Rather and Walter Cronkite as they reported the first on-camera murder and initiated the first continuous live coverage. Reporters who were part of this watershed in broadcast journalism have had four decades to consider events that were too fast and stunning to allow emotional detachment or reflection. They have never written their account of what happened on the scene in Dallas in 1963 until this book, and no other group had quite the behind-the-scene perspectives these four shared.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781589791398
Publisher:
Taylor Trade Publishing
Publication date:
12/15/2004
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
6.31(w) x 9.34(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

Dedicationvii
Acknowledgmentsix
Forewordxi
Preface: Real News That Really Matteredxiii
The Writersxv
Messengers of Tragedy
1.Covering a President Becomes a Nightmare3
2.Murderous Flight24
3.Cables and Carpetbaggers39
4.Epicenter of Grief49
On the Scene
5.Moving with the Story79
6.Gunman, Mob, and Mourners90
Seeds of Hatred
7.The Media, Extremists, and Dallas111
8.The Trials of Jacob Rubenstein132
9.The Last of "Sparky" Ruby153
Looking Back
10.Television, Radio, Ethics, and Duty177
11.Broadcast News, Forty Years After186
Afterword197
Index199

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When the News Went Live: Dallas 1963 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a must-read for journalism students, assassination and history buffs, and all of us who are old enough to remember where we were when we learned that Kennedy had been shot. It's a fascinating study of the events surrounding that tragedy from the viewpoint of local TV reporters, with revealing background info on the major players, the journalistic ethics of the day (long since changed, not for the better), disparate views of the city from inside and afar, and an informed look at the origins of some popular conspiracy theories. Bill Mercer's recollection of his interviews on the grassy knoll is particularly touching. For those of us of a certain age, there is an evocation of time and place that stays with the reader long after the book has been finished.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I stayed up all night reading when my copy of When The News Went Live, Dallas 1963 arrived. This book is a classic and should be included in the curriculum of every journalism and political science classroom in America. Huffaker, Mercer, Phenix and Wise have written the Texas story of the Kennedy assassination, the inside scoop on Oswald¿s murder and the history of the evolution of modern journalism. These four men were Dallas television reporters, on the scene and on their own, in the middle of the news story of the century. It is a salute to their training and their integrity as newsmen that their coverage under duress stands today as a compelling rendering of those fateful moments. I am glad they were the early ones on the scene, for they were the ones who broke the news to me in my elementary classroom. The story gives their perspectives more fully; all these years later, this book helps me understand the events and how they affected Texas and the nation. Bob, Bill, George and Wes were there in Dallas with their Southern sensibilities. They weren¿t easily pushed around or manipulated that dark day and still aren¿t. They were taught to tell the truth as objectively as possible, and they reverted to that training and their good common sense when placed in positions lesser men might have blown or exploited. These four men cared about truth and justice and fairness and still do. I hope all young journalists will read this and learn about balanced reporting.