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When the Silliest Cat Was Small
     

When the Silliest Cat Was Small

by Gilles Bachelet, Gilles Bachelet (Illustrator)
 
A companion to the breakout hit My Cat, the Silliest Cat in the World, chronicling the silliest cat's younger years

The only thing cuter than a cat is a kitten, and the only thing cuter than a kitten is Gilles Bachelet's remarkable kitten—who is actually an enormous elephant!

After being chosen from a litter of other brightly colored

Overview

A companion to the breakout hit My Cat, the Silliest Cat in the World, chronicling the silliest cat's younger years

The only thing cuter than a cat is a kitten, and the only thing cuter than a kitten is Gilles Bachelet's remarkable kitten—who is actually an enormous elephant!

After being chosen from a litter of other brightly colored elephants, Gilles's kitten must acclimate himself to his new home. Just like in the first book, the kitten behaves like a kitten should: making a mess, hiding from his food bowl, and waging a war with a particularly tricky stuffed animal. Readers will fall in love again with Bachelet's funny and affectionate drawings of his highly unusual "cat."

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
The narrator admits in the beginning that he does not know much about cats when he decides to adopt one. He does know what he wants--a cat that has a love of life, drinks milk with gusto, and washes himself with enthusiasm. The animals depicted are actually elephants, and the one selected does the opposite of everything the narrator describes. When they get home, the baby elephant is too large for the cat basket; he splashes water from the bathtub, and he stays up late to watch television. His tolerant owner presents him with a small stuffed elephant. The pet elephant tries many ways to rid himself of this irritant. He uses the wastebasket lid to snap it into a pot of water; he rips the stuffing out; and he drops it out the window. Finally, his owner gives him a musical carrot and the elephant is happy, although the narrator expresses concern that his pet seems to be entering a silly stage. It is rather disconcerting that the text constantly refers to cats and the pictures show elephants. Apparently this is the joke of the book, but it will likely need to be explained to young readers and listeners, especially since the narrator never acknowledges the �mistake.� Reviewer: Phyllis Kennemer, Ph.D.
School Library Journal

K-Gr 2
Readers familiar with My Cat, the Silliest Cat in the World (Abrams, 2006) already know that this pet is no ordinary feline. It is, in fact, an elephant. And therefore, what follows is an entertaining romp as this new companion displays catlike behavior in a huge way. This time the clueless man gives his "cat" a toy elephant to toss around while he is absent, completely misunderstanding its disinterest in the prop. Coming to a satisfying and hilarious conclusion, this story has colorful pen-and-ink illustrations that detail the frisky antics of an enormous creature, one that even sits on top of an old upright piano. A fun addition for storytimes.
—Blair ChristolonCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
Bachelet returns with his pet from My Cat, the Silliest Cat in the World (2006), which is actually an elephant, to relate the cat's early years. "Until I adopted a cat, I didn't know a thing about cats. I was counting on my gut to help me choose an ideal companion." The author picks a cat who loves milk, washing, play and sleep. He finds he made the right choice; his cat adjusts quickly to apartment life but sometimes seems sad. He buys it a stuffed, purple elephant, which the cat loves (though it sometimes gets lost). When his cat trades the toy for a squeaky carrot, the author thinks his cat might be entering a silly stage. Every cartoon picture of the elephant-cat shows it doing nearly the opposite of the author's observation. As it cavorts with its elephant siblings, who all have cat-colored coats, the author's cat obviously prefers not to drink milk, wash or play, and it prefers late-night TV to sleep. It also can't get rid of that elephant toy fast enough. This French import is as much of a goofy read as the droll first and sure to please the kids who are in on the joke. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780810994157
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/2007
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.75(w) x 12.12(h) x 0.32(d)
Age Range:
5 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Gilles Bachelet was born in 1952 in Saint Quentin, Aisne, France. After some training in art in college, he began illustrating for magazines and other press outlets. Ever since then he has been a professional illustrator. For five years, Gilles has taught illustration at the Ecole Supérieure d'Art in Cambrai, France.

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