When You Meet a Bear on Broadway

Overview

What do you do when you meet a bear on Broadway? Suck in your breath. Stick out your hand. And say, “Stop there, Little Bear!” If he cries and tells you that his mama is lost, you must help him find her.

With great humor and charm, Amy Hest’s wry, deceptively simple text captures every child’s worst fear—being separated from his mother—while Elivia Savadier’s whimsical watercolors bring to life the spirit and spunk of this memorable take-charge young heroine in an unforgettable ...

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Overview

What do you do when you meet a bear on Broadway? Suck in your breath. Stick out your hand. And say, “Stop there, Little Bear!” If he cries and tells you that his mama is lost, you must help him find her.

With great humor and charm, Amy Hest’s wry, deceptively simple text captures every child’s worst fear—being separated from his mother—while Elivia Savadier’s whimsical watercolors bring to life the spirit and spunk of this memorable take-charge young heroine in an unforgettable urban romp through the streets of New York.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Young children will recognize the thrill of an independent adventure, the drama of being lost, and the reassuring joy of being found.” —Starred, Booklist

“Savadier’s delicate black-line drawings capture, with just-right accuracy, a busy Upper West Side neighborhood filled with shops and people and apartment buildings.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Young readers will enjoy the short sentences, the generic city scenes and the comfort of seeing a little person take charge.” —BookPage

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Hest takes the reader to New York's Broadway to tell what to do when "you" meet a small bear there. The fantasy takes on a note readers can understand as the bear cries "BOOHOO!" loudly, stating that it is his mother who is lost. "You" must, of course, hush him, and talk things over. Then, as does the spunky heroine, "you" search with him uptown, downtown, along the river, and finally into the park. There the bear can climb a tree and call out to his mama, and she answers, coming to take him into her safe warm arms. Then "you" can run home and tell your mama the whole fanciful story. Hest tells it in her charming, matter-of-fact text with a note of reassurance for lost mamas and fearful little ones. Savadier's sketchy ink and watercolor illustrations of the buildings and shops along Broadway fill the scenes of the early search with people going about their business. Many details appear through the front end pages, where we first see the little lost bear, the title page, where the girl appears, and on through to the end pages where she and her mother shop on Broadway together as bear and mama go off together as well. Readers are drawn into the story as it progresses through the sights of the city. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—A wispy-haired young girl dressed in a blue coat, orange-and-red striped stockings, and a beret takes charge of a lost baby bear. With the staunch, internalized voice of a mother, the heroine calms him ("Hush-a-bit, Little Bear. So we can think"), asks questions, and looks for his mama. They come upon a park and a big tree to climb. In a heartfelt spread, Little Bear cries "Ma-maaa!" from the highest branch and can be heard throughout town, beckoning his mother's return. The sketchy lines of the city, drawn in pen and ink and watercolor with little variation in value, create a flat New York streetscape, yet the sole emphasis on the characters and natural elements adds to the reassuring overtones and rhythms of the text. Short phrases make the story flow. The baby bear's infantlike talk will charm the youngest children, but for an urban lost-and-found story with a little more drama, try Alexis Deacon's Beegu (Farrar, 2003).—Sara Paulson-Yarovoy, American Sign Language and English Lower School PS 347, New York City
Kirkus Reviews
A little girl kindly helps a lost bear cub she meets on Broadway as they set off together to find his mother. When his plaintive call finally leads his mother to him, the girl waves goodbye and runs home to tell her own mama all about her adventure. Hest's sweet, very slight tale has an air of innocence about it as the little girl instructs readers on the proper, polite way to behave in this situation. This is a New York in which a child can go confidently about her neighborhood on her own, knowing that she will safely return home to her own mother. Savadier's delicate black-line drawings capture, with just-right accuracy, a busy Upper West Side neighborhood filled with shops and people and apartment buildings. The girl and the bears are brightly defined while the settings are rendered in soft, autumn colors. The endpapers expand the Broadway scenes as they provide a preview of the tale at the beginning and a bit of an epilogue at the end. Gentle and winning. (Picture book. 3-7)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780374400156
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
  • Publication date: 9/29/2009
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 40
  • Age range: 3 - 6 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.10 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

AMY HEST’s many acclaimed children’s books include the New York Times bestseller Kiss Good Night. A three-time winner of the prestigious Christopher Award, she lives in New York City. ELIVIA SAVADIER has illustrated numerous popular picture books, including her own Will Sheila Share? She lives in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts.

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