Where Are You Going? To See My Friend!

Where Are You Going? To See My Friend!

by Eric Carle
     
 

Acclaimed author-illustrator Eric Carle and Japanese artist Kazuo Iwamura have created a unique bilingual book, half in English, half in Japanese, with each half illustrated respectively by Carle and Iwamura. Carle, using his distinctive collage technique, and Iwamura introduce a colorful cast of characters who join one another, one-by-one, on the way to see their… See more details below

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Overview

Acclaimed author-illustrator Eric Carle and Japanese artist Kazuo Iwamura have created a unique bilingual book, half in English, half in Japanese, with each half illustrated respectively by Carle and Iwamura. Carle, using his distinctive collage technique, and Iwamura introduce a colorful cast of characters who join one another, one-by-one, on the way to see their friends. The two parts meet in the middle, in a beautiful eight-page gatefold. Here, Carle and Iwamura's stories and art come together, as the friends finally meet, joining English and Japanese.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

(Preschool) Carle and Japanese illustrator Iwamura tell a story together in this handsome collaboration. An English text, featuring Carle's illustrations, runs to the midpoint of the book; a Japanese text, illustrated by Iwamura, runs the opposite direction, with the two tales meeting in the middle. Both texts tell the same simple, child-appealing, animal-sound-filled story--a dog on its way to visit a child is joined by various animals--and small icons beside the text handily identify which animal or animals are speaking. Well-designed pages feature lots of white space that attractively showcases both Carle's bold collage art and Iwamura's delicate watercolors. Despite their contrasting styles, the illustrations mesh seamlessly in a stunning gatefold page in the middle of the book that shows all the animals, and each child (Carle's is a boy, Iwamura's is a girl), dancing and singing (music provided) with their counterpart. Library patrons will miss out on the author-illustrators' notes on the inner side of the jacket, and Carle's note contains the book's only mention that the Japanese text reads from the "back," something that non-Japanese speakers may not figure out right away. While the pronunciation guides provide some interest, they don't insure that non-Japanese speakers can read Iwamura's text aloud with any skill, especially since there's no note explaining that the vertically written text reads right to left; similarly, while bilingual kids can fully appreciate the entire book, they will find the transliteration unnecessary and perhaps even distracting. But all readers can appreciate both sets of illustrations in this innovative book. Copyright 2002 of The Horn Book, Inc. All rights reserved. --The Horn Book, May/June 2003

This lively and rhythmic, bilingual picture book is told in dialogue, with rebuslike symbols used to identify speakers. It details an energetic romp with a dog, cat, rooster, goat, rabbit, and a child, all of whom become friends. Carle's familiar collage technique is employed in the book's first half, while Iwamura's gentle watercolor illustrations, combined with the Japanese text, make up the second half. The two texts are divided by a gatefold that includes the music and lyrics to the song "Where Are You Going? To See My Friend!" in English and Japanese. An irresistible, spirited ode to friendship.--School Library Journal, March 2003

This collaboration between two artists, Carle explains in an introductory note, "required an artistic balancing act that still kept the project spontaneous." The result of their efforts is a resounding success. Each author/artist relates the same cumulative story about a dog on its way to a human friend, gathering other animals along the way. With minimal text featuring an exuberant refrain (" May I come with you?' Yes, come along./ Our friend is your friend' "), each artist renders the scenario in spare artwork, rendered in his own distinctive style. Carle's English version begins at the front of the book and Iwamura's (the Fourteen Mice series) version, as is the custom in his native Japan, begins at the back. The two tales meet in the middle with a gatefold spread that unites the two human friends (Carle depicts a boy with a guitar, Iwamura a girl shaking a tambourine); youngsters open the gatefold to find the respective menageries in tow, and a song-with melody line provided-that incorporates all of the animals' sounds (in their order of appearance: "Bow Wow Wow/ Meow Meow Meow/ Cock a dood-le doo/ Baa Baa Baa/ Hop Hop Hop") in both English and Japanese. Inventively, as the story progresses, a small icon (a bunny with long ears; a boy with a baseball cap; etc.) designates each speaker's voice. The remarkable achievement here is how well the two artists' styles-so different in media and execution-mesh. Carle uses his signature bold paint strokes and collage, Iwamura emp

Publishers Weekly
This collaboration between two artists, Carle explains in an introductory note, "required an artistic balancing act that still kept the project spontaneous." The result of their efforts is a resounding success. Each author/artist relates the same cumulative story about a dog on its way to a human friend, gathering other animals along the way. With minimal text featuring an exuberant refrain (" `May I come with you?' `Yes, come along./ Our friend is your friend' "), each artist renders the scenario in spare artwork, rendered in his own distinctive style. Carle's English version begins at the front of the book and Iwamura's (the Fourteen Mice series) version, as is the custom in his native Japan, begins at the back. The two tales meet in the middle with a gatefold spread that unites the two human friends (Carle depicts a boy with a guitar, Iwamura a girl shaking a tambourine); youngsters open the gatefold to find the respective menageries in tow, and a song-with melody line provided-that incorporates all of the animals' sounds (in their order of appearance: "Bow Wow Wow/ Meow Meow Meow/ Cock a dood-le doo/ Baa Baa Baa/ Hop Hop Hop") in both English and Japanese. Inventively, as the story progresses, a small icon (a bunny with long ears; a boy with a baseball cap; etc.) designates each speaker's voice. The remarkable achievement here is how well the two artists' styles-so different in media and execution-mesh. Carle uses his signature bold paint strokes and collage, Iwamura employs a fine black line and delicate watercolor wash; but each makes brilliant use of the white space surrounding the characters. When all of the animals join at the center, each pairs off with its alter ego; Carle's bold collage rooster, in fauvian greens, blues and reds, regards Iwamura's finely drawn, realistic counterpart, while the two dragonflies flit about. Eyes closed, Carle's boy strums his guitar, lost in song, while Iwamura's girl looks directly at readers, as if telling them to "Come along. Our friend is your friend." A charming ode to friendship and an ideal showcase for two varied and vibrant artistic styles. Ages 3-7. (Apr.) Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Start from the left and read the story in English of a dog, a cat, a rooster, a goat, and a rabbit as they travel to meet a young boy with a guitar. Begin on the right for the Japanese version as these same animals approach a girl with a tambourine. The grand finale occurs in the middle of the book where the boy, the girl, and all of the animals meet on a foldout spread to sing a joyous song of friendship. Carle and Iwamura have collaborated in the creation of this unique tribute to friends everywhere. Each artist has created illustrations in his own style and they all come together beautifully. The story of the origins of this book and the collaborative effort involved to make it a reality is told on the backside of the book cover. Pictures of the two artists and the music for the concluding song also appear there. This story of friendship in two languages is a delight for all ages. 2001, Orchard,
— Phyllis Kennemer
School Library Journal
PreS-This lively and rhythmic, bilingual picture book is told in dialogue, with rebuslike symbols used to identify speakers. It details an energetic romp with a dog, cat, rooster, goat, rabbit, and a child, all of whom become friends. Carle's familiar collage technique is employed in the book's first half, while Iwamura's gentle watercolor illustrations, combined with the Japanese text, make up the second half. The two texts are divided by a gatefold that includes the music and lyrics to the song "Where Are You Going? To See My Friend!" in English and Japanese. An irresistible, spirited ode to friendship.-Andrea Tarr, Corona Public Library, CA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A unique venture between two friends, who happen to be famous artists. In a simple cumulative tale of friendship, a dog, a cat, a rooster, a goat, a rabbit, and a child repeatedly pose the question and answer of the title. What makes this book singular is that Carle's characters are marching along from front to back, left to right, in typical Western style. At the middle, the story is joined in a broad open-out, four-page spread by Iwamura's story that is a mirror image of Carle's, the exception being that the child in Carle's story is a boy and Iwamura's is a girl. The boy and girl greet each other with hands extended in symbolic greeting. This works ingeniously because the Iwamura story is told from back to front and right to left as is typical of Japanese books. When the Carle characters and the Iwamura characters meet in the middle, they merge and mingle in a merry frolic. Carle's figures are created with his recognizably bold collage technique. Iwamura's sweet-faced, gently rounded figures are painted in soft watercolors that contrast nicely with Carle's more vibrant palette. Carle's text is in English, while Iwamura's is written in Japanese characters accompanied by a pronunciation guide. Short, informative essays by Carle and Iwamura, which describe their collaboration, are printed inside the book jacket, which may, unfortunately, render them inaccessible to library patrons. Since Japanese animal sounds have an interesting onomatopoetic difference from our own, while Westerners would need to rehearse to give the Japanese story a lively cadence that would hold the attention of the youngest listeners, this would make a wonderful opportunity for tandem reading in a bilingual storytime. This will be especially welcome in communities with a Japanese population. (Picture book. 3-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439416597
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
03/17/2003
Edition description:
Bilingual: Japanese-English
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
380,239
Product dimensions:
11.14(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.43(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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