Where Are You Going? To See My Friend!

Overview


Legendary author/illustrator Eric Carle pairs with Kazuo Iwamura to create a picture book full of rhyme and repetition, in a question and response format that will delight young readers.

Acclaimed author-illustrator Eric Carle and Japanese artist Kazuo Iwamura have created a unique bilingual book, half in English, half in Japanese, with each half illustrated respectively by Carle and Iwamura. Carle, using his distinctive collage technique, and Iwamura introduce a colorful cast ...

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Overview


Legendary author/illustrator Eric Carle pairs with Kazuo Iwamura to create a picture book full of rhyme and repetition, in a question and response format that will delight young readers.

Acclaimed author-illustrator Eric Carle and Japanese artist Kazuo Iwamura have created a unique bilingual book, half in English, half in Japanese, with each half illustrated respectively by Carle and Iwamura. Carle, using his distinctive collage technique, and Iwamura introduce a colorful cast of characters who join one another, one-by-one, on the way to see their friends. The two parts meet in the middle, in a beautiful eight-page gatefold. Here, Carle and Iwamura's stories and art come together, as the friends finally meet, joining English and Japanese.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Bestselling U.S. and Japanese authors Eric Carle and Kazuo Iwamura team up for a zippy bilingual celebration of friendship, culture, and fun.

Combining their art and languages to create a book that a reader can begin at either end and follow toward the middle, Carle and Iwamura take collaborative efforts to playful heights. Fundamentally, each author tells the same story, about a troupe of animals that have banded together to meet a human friend. Carle's English version begins in front with his welcoming cut-paper illustrations, and at its conclusion the animals meet up with a red-capped boy holding a guitar. Iwamura's Japanese version, illustrated with his gentle watercolors, begins in back and reads right to left, with a tambourine-playing girl being the animals' human pal. The boy and girl then meet in the center of the book. Their delighted exclamation -- "My friends have come. Now let's sing and dance!" -- leads to a magnificent fold-out extravaganza on friendship, bringing all the jubilant characters together as they "bow wow wow" and "meow meow meow" with glee.

In this sublime, multilevel book that's perfect for broadening any child's horizons, Carle and Iwamura are a magnificent match. Young readers will enjoy paging back and forth as they follow the correspondences between the English and Japanese versions, and they'll be smitten with the two different portrayals of the animals and scenery. Both well conceived and educational, this warmhearted read brings a far-distant land a little closer to home. Matt Warner

From the Publisher

(Preschool) Carle and Japanese illustrator Iwamura tell a story together in this handsome collaboration. An English text, featuring Carle's illustrations, runs to the midpoint of the book; a Japanese text, illustrated by Iwamura, runs the opposite direction, with the two tales meeting in the middle. Both texts tell the same simple, child-appealing, animal-sound-filled story--a dog on its way to visit a child is joined by various animals--and small icons beside the text handily identify which animal or animals are speaking. Well-designed pages feature lots of white space that attractively showcases both Carle's bold collage art and Iwamura's delicate watercolors. Despite their contrasting styles, the illustrations mesh seamlessly in a stunning gatefold page in the middle of the book that shows all the animals, and each child (Carle's is a boy, Iwamura's is a girl), dancing and singing (music provided) with their counterpart. Library patrons will miss out on the author-illustrators' notes on the inner side of the jacket, and Carle's note contains the book's only mention that the Japanese text reads from the "back," something that non-Japanese speakers may not figure out right away. While the pronunciation guides provide some interest, they don't insure that non-Japanese speakers can read Iwamura's text aloud with any skill, especially since there's no note explaining that the vertically written text reads right to left; similarly, while bilingual kids can fully appreciate the entire book, they will find the transliteration unnecessary and perhaps even distracting. But all readers can appreciate both sets of illustrations in this innovative book. Copyright 2002 of The Horn Book, Inc. All rights reserved. --The Horn Book, May/June 2003

This lively and rhythmic, bilingual picture book is told in dialogue, with rebuslike symbols used to identify speakers. It details an energetic romp with a dog, cat, rooster, goat, rabbit, and a child, all of whom become friends. Carle's familiar collage technique is employed in the book's first half, while Iwamura's gentle watercolor illustrations, combined with the Japanese text, make up the second half. The two texts are divided by a gatefold that includes the music and lyrics to the song "Where Are You Going? To See My Friend!" in English and Japanese. An irresistible, spirited ode to friendship.--School Library Journal, March 2003

This collaboration between two artists, Carle explains in an introductory note, "required an artistic balancing act that still kept the project spontaneous." The result of their efforts is a resounding success. Each author/artist relates the same cumulative story about a dog on its way to a human friend, gathering other animals along the way. With minimal text featuring an exuberant refrain (" May I come with you?' Yes, come along./ Our friend is your friend' "), each artist renders the scenario in spare artwork, rendered in his own distinctive style. Carle's English version begins at the front of the book and Iwamura's (the Fourteen Mice series) version, as is the custom in his native Japan, begins at the back. The two tales meet in the middle with a gatefold spread that unites the two human friends (Carle depicts a boy with a guitar, Iwamura a girl shaking a tambourine); youngsters open the gatefold to find the respective menageries in tow, and a song-with melody line provided-that incorporates all of the animals' sounds (in their order of appearance: "Bow Wow Wow/ Meow Meow Meow/ Cock a dood-le doo/ Baa Baa Baa/ Hop Hop Hop") in both English and Japanese. Inventively, as the story progresses, a small icon (a bunny with long ears; a boy with a baseball cap; etc.) designates each speaker's voice. The remarkable achievement here is how well the two artists' styles-so different in media and execution-mesh. Carle uses his signature bold paint strokes and collage, Iwamura emp

Publishers Weekly
This collaboration between two artists, Carle explains in an introductory note, "required an artistic balancing act that still kept the project spontaneous." The result of their efforts is a resounding success. Each author/artist relates the same cumulative story about a dog on its way to a human friend, gathering other animals along the way. With minimal text featuring an exuberant refrain (" `May I come with you?' `Yes, come along./ Our friend is your friend' "), each artist renders the scenario in spare artwork, rendered in his own distinctive style. Carle's English version begins at the front of the book and Iwamura's (the Fourteen Mice series) version, as is the custom in his native Japan, begins at the back. The two tales meet in the middle with a gatefold spread that unites the two human friends (Carle depicts a boy with a guitar, Iwamura a girl shaking a tambourine); youngsters open the gatefold to find the respective menageries in tow, and a song-with melody line provided-that incorporates all of the animals' sounds (in their order of appearance: "Bow Wow Wow/ Meow Meow Meow/ Cock a dood-le doo/ Baa Baa Baa/ Hop Hop Hop") in both English and Japanese. Inventively, as the story progresses, a small icon (a bunny with long ears; a boy with a baseball cap; etc.) designates each speaker's voice. The remarkable achievement here is how well the two artists' styles-so different in media and execution-mesh. Carle uses his signature bold paint strokes and collage, Iwamura employs a fine black line and delicate watercolor wash; but each makes brilliant use of the white space surrounding the characters. When all of the animals join at the center, each pairs off with its alter ego; Carle's bold collage rooster, in fauvian greens, blues and reds, regards Iwamura's finely drawn, realistic counterpart, while the two dragonflies flit about. Eyes closed, Carle's boy strums his guitar, lost in song, while Iwamura's girl looks directly at readers, as if telling them to "Come along. Our friend is your friend." A charming ode to friendship and an ideal showcase for two varied and vibrant artistic styles. Ages 3-7. (Apr.) Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Start from the left and read the story in English of a dog, a cat, a rooster, a goat, and a rabbit as they travel to meet a young boy with a guitar. Begin on the right for the Japanese version as these same animals approach a girl with a tambourine. The grand finale occurs in the middle of the book where the boy, the girl, and all of the animals meet on a foldout spread to sing a joyous song of friendship. Carle and Iwamura have collaborated in the creation of this unique tribute to friends everywhere. Each artist has created illustrations in his own style and they all come together beautifully. The story of the origins of this book and the collaborative effort involved to make it a reality is told on the backside of the book cover. Pictures of the two artists and the music for the concluding song also appear there. This story of friendship in two languages is a delight for all ages. 2001, Orchard,
— Phyllis Kennemer
School Library Journal
PreS-This lively and rhythmic, bilingual picture book is told in dialogue, with rebuslike symbols used to identify speakers. It details an energetic romp with a dog, cat, rooster, goat, rabbit, and a child, all of whom become friends. Carle's familiar collage technique is employed in the book's first half, while Iwamura's gentle watercolor illustrations, combined with the Japanese text, make up the second half. The two texts are divided by a gatefold that includes the music and lyrics to the song "Where Are You Going? To See My Friend!" in English and Japanese. An irresistible, spirited ode to friendship.-Andrea Tarr, Corona Public Library, CA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A unique venture between two friends, who happen to be famous artists. In a simple cumulative tale of friendship, a dog, a cat, a rooster, a goat, a rabbit, and a child repeatedly pose the question and answer of the title. What makes this book singular is that Carle's characters are marching along from front to back, left to right, in typical Western style. At the middle, the story is joined in a broad open-out, four-page spread by Iwamura's story that is a mirror image of Carle's, the exception being that the child in Carle's story is a boy and Iwamura's is a girl. The boy and girl greet each other with hands extended in symbolic greeting. This works ingeniously because the Iwamura story is told from back to front and right to left as is typical of Japanese books. When the Carle characters and the Iwamura characters meet in the middle, they merge and mingle in a merry frolic. Carle's figures are created with his recognizably bold collage technique. Iwamura's sweet-faced, gently rounded figures are painted in soft watercolors that contrast nicely with Carle's more vibrant palette. Carle's text is in English, while Iwamura's is written in Japanese characters accompanied by a pronunciation guide. Short, informative essays by Carle and Iwamura, which describe their collaboration, are printed inside the book jacket, which may, unfortunately, render them inaccessible to library patrons. Since Japanese animal sounds have an interesting onomatopoetic difference from our own, while Westerners would need to rehearse to give the Japanese story a lively cadence that would hold the attention of the youngest listeners, this would make a wonderful opportunity for tandem reading in a bilingual storytime. This will be especially welcome in communities with a Japanese population. (Picture book. 3-7)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780439416597
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 3/17/2003
  • Edition description: Bilingual: Japanese-English
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 308,503
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 11.14 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.43 (d)

Meet the Author

Eric Carle

Eric Carle is known around the world for his many highly original and beautiful picture books, including THE VERY HUNGRY CATERPILLAR and ERIC CARLE'S TREASURY OF CLASSIC STORIES FOR CHILDREN. For more information, please go to www.eric-carle.com.

Biography

Ever since he began innovating the look and function of children's stories in the late 1960s, Eric Carle has remained an author whose stories reliably hit the bestseller lists and remain on kids' bookshelves through generations.

He began as a designer of promotions and ads, and one illustration of a red lobster helped jump-start his career. The lobster caught the eye of author Bill Martin, Jr.; Martin asked Carle to illustrate the now-classic 1967 title Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? and a career was born.

Born in Syracuse, New York but brought by his immigrant parents back to Germany when he was six, Carle was educated in Stuttgart and designed posters for the United States Information Center there after graduating from art school. He finally returned to the country he missed so much as a child in 1952.

He eventually began procuring work on children's titles, and found himself becoming increasingly involved in them. "I felt something of my own past stirring in me," he wrote in a 2000 essay. "An unresolved part of my own education needed reworking, and I began to make books -- books for myself, books for the child in me, books I had yearned for. I became my own teacher -- but this time an understanding one."

He began his career with the 1968 title 1, 2, 3 to the Zoo; but his next title, The Very Hungry Caterpillar, is what still endears him to young readers today. Employing his bright, collage style and lending an immediacy to the tale by manifesting the caterpillar's hunger in actual holes in the pages, Carle began what would be a long career of creative approaches to simple stories. From the chirp emerging from The Very Quiet Cricket to the delightful fold-out pages in Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me, Carle's books provide surprises that make his stories come alive in ways that many titles for preschoolers do not.

Carle's style, with its diaphanous, busy and bold artwork, is perfect for engaging new readers. His stories are also popular with parents and educators for their introductions to the natural world and its cycles. It's a particular pleasure to follow Carle into different corners of the world and see what can be learned from the creatures who live in them.

Good To Know

Regularly asked where he gets his ideas, Carle is quoted on his publisher's web site as responding: "Of course, the question of where ideas come from is the most difficult of all. Some people like to say they get ideas when they're in the shower. That's always a very entertaining answer, but I think it's much deeper than that. It goes back to your upbringing, your education, and so forth." He does say, however, that the idea for The Very Hungry Caterpillar came when he whimsically began punching holes in some paper, which suggested to him a bookworm at work. His editor later suggested he change the bookworm to a caterpillar, and the rest is history.

Carle was unhappy to be in Germany when his immigrant parents brought him back there as a child. He hated his new school and wanted to go back to America. He said: "When it became apparent that we would not return, I decided that I would become a bridge builder. I would build a bridge from Germany to America and take my beloved German grandmother by the hand across the wide ocean."

Before he became a freelance illustrator and began working on children's books, Carle worked as a graphic designer for the New York Times and as art director of an ad agency.

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    1. Hometown:
      Northampton, Massachusetts and the Berkshires
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 25, 1929
    2. Place of Birth:
      Syracuse, New York
    1. Education:
      Akademie der bildenden Künste, Stuttgart, 1946-50
    2. Website:

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2003

    Cross-Curriculum Ideas?

    I am so excited by the potential uses for teaching in this wonderful book. Has anyone developed some ideas for cross curriculum teaching that you'd be willing to share? (Social studies, art, music, library/media) Thank you for any input. Nancy Bristow, Elementary Library

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2003

    Friendship and fun for all!

    'My friends have come. Now let's sing and dance!' This is a perfect children's book to teach children friendship. Our kids loved the cut out style pictures that are bright and cheerful, as is the story. I would definitely recommend this title.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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