Where Did Sacagawea Join the Corps of Discovery?: And Other Questions about the Lewis and Clark Expedition

Overview

When President Thomas Jefferson purchased the Louisiana Territory in 1803, the size of the United States almost doubled. Suddenly, the country stretched from the Atlantic Ocean all the way to the Rocky Mountains. But no one knew much about the new territory. Jefferson sent Meriwether Lewis and William Clark to explore it and report on what they found.

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Overview

When President Thomas Jefferson purchased the Louisiana Territory in 1803, the size of the United States almost doubled. Suddenly, the country stretched from the Atlantic Ocean all the way to the Rocky Mountains. But no one knew much about the new territory. Jefferson sent Meriwether Lewis and William Clark to explore it and report on what they found.

What Would they Need for their Journey?

How Would they Cross High Waterfalls, Snowy Mountains, and Raging Rives?

Who Would Help Them Speak and Trade with Native Americans Along the Way?

Discover how Lewis and Clark overcame these and other challenges while collecting important scientific information and carefully mapping unknown lands. Find out how their courageous expeditions opened the west for expansion, trade, and development.

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Product Details

Table of Contents

Introduction 4

1 The Voyage of Discovery Begins 6

2 Indians, Buffalo, and Prairie Dogs 12

3 Wild and Dangerous Adventures 18

4 Winter at Fort Clatsop 26

5 Escape from the Blackfeet 34

Primary Source: Meriweather Lewis's Journal 42

Tell Your Expedition Story 43

Timeline 44

Source Notes 46

Selected Bibliography 46

Futher Reading and Websites 47

Index 48

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2011

    This is a fun, fascinating look at the role Sacagawea had as Lewis and Clark explored the Louisiana Territory

    The quest for the West was on once President Thomas Jefferson cemented a deal with Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte with the $15 million purchase of the Louisiana Territory in 1804. It was a bargain that "nearly doubled the size of the country," but Bonaparte "needed money to fight a war in Europe," and was more than willing to give up the land. Jefferson was anxious to find a Northwest Passage that explorers and settlers could easily traverse as they crossed the United States, which doubled in size as soon as the Louisiana Territory was acquired. Specifically he was in hopes of finding a waterway, but he also was interested in learning about the flora, fauna, the climate, soil conditions, the Indians of the area and developing a map for the area. The job would be tedious and dangerous and Jefferson chose his "private secretary, Meriwether Lewis to lead the expedition." In turn, Lewis chose William Clark as his capable co-captain to lead the "Corps of Discovery" into the unknown territory.

    In the spring of 1804 "about forty men boarded a 55-foot (15 meter) covered flat-bottom boat and two large canoes" and began their venture to the West. As they moved across the country Meriwether Lewis began to talk to Indian tribes saying that the "United States wanted to trade with them and have friendly relations." During the winter they chanced to meet Toussaint Charbonneau and his young wife, Sacagawea, a Shoshone Indian. Both would join the trek to the West and would prove critical to its success. During the winter Sacagawea gave birth to Jean-Baptiste ("Pomp") and by April the keelboat headed back to St. Louis. In this book you will also learn how several of the men kept journals, the dangers they encountered, how Sacagawea rescued seemingly lost journals and supplies, you will learn how she interpreted for the group, how the expedition almost perished, their encounters with dangerous Indians, Sacagawea's importance to the "Corps of Discovery," and many other interesting facts about this two-and-one-half-year adventure into the wilds of the Louisiana Territory.

    This is a fun, fascinating look at the role Sacagawea had as Lewis and Clark explored the Louisiana Territory. This book is set up by providing the answers to six questions. At the end of each chapter a question is presented that will be explored in the next. For example, at the end of chapter two, we are asked, "Where would they meet the dangers the Mandans described?" The book had an easy flow to it and included many interesting vignettes that many people are unaware of. One of these was the story of how Pierre Cruzatte shot Captain Lewis and how this unfortunate, but somewhat amusing incident occurred. Throughout the book are several informative sidebars that add to the text. The book is generously illustrated with a few photographs, numerous art reproductions, and maps. In the back of the book is an index, a discussion about primary source materials (journals), an activity, a timeline, source notes, a selected bibliography, and additional recommended book and website resources. There are free downloadable educational resources on the publisher's website, including "crossword puzzles, timelines, and additional website links."

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