Where Does the Money Go?: Resource Allocation in Elementary and Secondary Schools / Edition 1

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Overview

Across the United States, there is growing pressure for greater accountability in how schools spend the tax revenue they receive. This volume summarizes the emerging research in educational resource allocations at district, school and classroom levels in an effort to address this need.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Lawrence O. Picus is professor of education finance and policy at the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California. His current research interests focus on adequacy and equity in school finance as well as efficiency and productivity in the provision of educational programs for K-12 school children. Picus is past president of the Association for Education Finance and Policy (AEFP) and is the president of the board of Ed Source, a California-based education research organization. Picus is the coauthor of School Finance: A Policy Perspective (5th edition) with Allan R. Odden. He has authored, coauthored, or edited several other books including Where Does the Money Go? Resource
Allocation in Elementary and Secondary Schools (1995), In Search of More Productive Schools: A Guide to Resource Allocation in Education (2001), Developing Community-Empowered Schools (2001) coauthored with Mary Ann Burke, and Principles of School Business Administration (1995) with R. Craig Wood, David Thompson, and Don I. Tharpe. He has also published numerous articles in professional journals. Picus studies how educational resources are allocated and used in schools across the United States. He has conducted studies of the impact of incentives on school district performance. Picus maintains close contact with the superintendents and chief business officers of school districts throughout California and the nation and is a member of a number of professional organizations dedicated to improving school district management. He is a former member of the Editorial Advisory Committee of the Association of School Business Officials International, and he has served as a consultant to the National Education Association, American Federation of Teachers, the National Center for Education Statistics, and West Ed. He served as the principal consultant for the design of school funding systems in Wyoming and Arkansas and has conducted equity, adequacy, and resource allocation studies in Arizona, Arkansas, Washington, Vermont, Oregon, South Carolina, Louisiana, Kansas,
Kentucky, Montana, New Jersey, Nebraska, Texas, North Dakota, Ohio, Wisconsin, and Maine. Picus holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from Reed College and master’s degrees from the University of Chicago and the Pardee RAND Graduate School. He received his Ph D in public policy analysis from the Pardee RAND Graduate School.

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Table of Contents

Preface - Lawrence O Picus
Why Do We Need to Know What Money Buys? - Lawrence O Picus and Minaz B Fazel
Research on Resource Allocation Patterns in Elementary and Secondary Schools
The Quest for Equalized Mediocrity - Eric A Hanushek
School Finance Reform without Consideration of School Performance
Money Does Matter - Richard D Laine, Rob Greenwald, and Larry V Hedges
A Research Synthesis of a New Universe of Education Production Function Studies
Does Equal Funding for Districts Mean Equal Funding for Classroom Students? - Linda Hertert
Evidence from California
Beyond District-Level Expenditures - Yasser A Nakib
Schooling Resource Allocation and Use in Florida
Bringing Money to the Classroom - Sheree T Speakman et al
A Systemic Resource Allocations Model Applied to the New York City Public Schools
Allocating Resources to Influence Teacher Retention - Neil D Theobald and R Mark Gritz
Stretching the Tax Dollar - David M Anderson
Increasing Efficiency in Urban and Rural Schools
The Allocation of Educational Resources and School Finance Equity in Ohio - Thomas B Timar
Resource Allocation Patterns within School Finance Litigation Strategies - R Craig Wood and Jeffrey Maiden
Redefining School-Based Budgeting for High-Involvement - Priscilla Wohlstetter and Amy Van Kirk
The Politics of School-Level Finance Data and State Policy Making - Carolyn D Herrington
Implications for Policy - James W Guthrie
What Might Happen in American Education If It Were Known How Money Actually Is Spent?

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