Where I Belong

Where I Belong

4.1 153
by Gwendolyn Heasley
     
 

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Meet Corrinne. She's living every girl's dream in New York City—shopping sprees at Barneys, open access to the best clubs and parties, and her own horse at the country club. Her perfect life is perfectly on track. At least it was. . . .

When Corrinne's father is laid off, her world suddenly falls apart. Instead of heading to boarding school, she's stripped

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Overview

Meet Corrinne. She's living every girl's dream in New York City—shopping sprees at Barneys, open access to the best clubs and parties, and her own horse at the country club. Her perfect life is perfectly on track. At least it was. . . .

When Corrinne's father is laid off, her world suddenly falls apart. Instead of heading to boarding school, she's stripped of her credit cards and shipped off to the boonies of Texas to live with her grandparents. On her own in a big public school and forced to take a job shoveling manure, Corrinne is determined to get back to the life she's supposed to be living. She doesn't care who she stomps on in the process. But when Corrinne makes an unlikely friend and discovers a total hottie at work, she begins to wonder if her life B.R.—before the recession—was as perfect as it seemed.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The recession hits Corrinne Corcoran's wealthy family hard in Heasley's first novel. Corrinne's father loses his job and moves to Dubai to find work, leaving her mother behind to sell their Manhattan apartment while 16-year-old Corrinne and her younger brother, Tripp, head to Broken Spoke, Tex., her mother's long (and best) forgotten hometown. Corrinne is horrified to trade her ritzy, snobby, Gossip Girl�style life for the slow-paced, carbohydrate-rich world of her grandparents. The moral of Heasley's story is one familiar to any number of romantic comedies on page and on screen: namely, that smalltown life is every bit as rewarding as the bustle of the city if given half a chance. This premise results in a predictable story, as Heasley dishes out one smalltown cliché after another in an effort to deliver some tension. Painful manure episodes aside, Heasley also offers plenty of Texas boys, football parties, and a rodeo as city girl turns country girl and learns some lessons about family and good old-fashioned fun. A sweet, by-the-numbers romance with a substantial dose of corny humor. Ages 12�up. (Feb.)
VOYA - Teri Lesesne
Corinne is miserable when she is forced to leave her New York City apartment and its attendant lifestyle to go live with her grandparents in a small town in Texas. The recession has finally hit her family: Dad has lost his job, and the family savings have been embezzled. There is no boarding school for Corinne. Instead, she will attend Broken Spoke High School, home of the Mockingbirds. To make matters worse, Corinne's grandmother expects her to work at the local stable. Shoveling manure is definitely not something someone who once shopped at Barney's is eager to do. There is, however, a hot guy who will work alongside her. Maybe things are looking up? The story offers readers equal doses of romance and teen angst. Stereotypes abound, from the self-involved musician who Corinne crushes on to the snooty boarding school friend and the commentary on small town life in Texas. There are, however, some important observations about family and friends here as well. There are a few errors in the advance reading copy, which will hopefully be corrected in the final book. Female readers who are fans of the romance genre will be drawn to this book whose cover promises sparks will fly between the New York sophisticate and the Texas cowboy. Reviewer: Teri Lesesne
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up—It must be a bad dream. Corrine Corcoran finds herself living in a rural town in Texas with her brother and grandparents. Instead of riding her own horse and sharing a room with her best friend at an elite prep school, she is sharing a bedroom with her mother and working as a stable hand. Her family is the victim of a Madoff-like investment scam and her father was laid off from his job, forcing her parents to give up their posh Manhattan lifestyle. Despite her efforts to remain removed from the town's disappointing social scene, Corrine manages to attract a new friend, the attention of the local football star, and a responsible role in the upcoming rodeo event. As her friend from Manhattan plans a visit to Broken Spoke, the teen worries that Waverly will learn the truth about her unglamorous existence as a "recessionista." In the end, Corrine learns that the town has changed her in ways she did not anticipate. Corrine's voice is witty and appropriately bratty in the spoiled-rich-girl tone. The plot is predictable but moves along at a satisfying pace. While realistic for some, underage drinking is accepted by the adults in both Manhattan and Texas, and the recession is too obviously superimposed on the plot. However, readers looking for the comfortingly familiar riches-to-rags story will not be disappointed.—Lynn Rashid, Marriotts Ridge High School, Marriottsville, MD
Kirkus Reviews

Sixteen-year-old Corrinne begins her self-focused narrative with a plea—"If you hate me at first, keep reading." She's easy to dislike: Wealthy, shallow and something of a bad girl, she readily evades her lax parents to enjoy lots of underage drinking. After her father loses his job, she and younger brother Tripp are shipped off to live with her salt-of-the-earth grandparents in small-town Texas, where the biggest issues may be whether or not the high-school football team has a winning season and who will attend the adult-ignored beer parties. She falls for musical hunk Rider, while football hunk Bubby falls for her. After reluctantly taking a job at a stable, she explores the reasons her mother turned her back on small-town life. Planning a fund-raising rodeo and enduring a visit from her rich NYC BFF push Corrinne to reexamine her values—all before Thanksgiving. Patience really is required: Rich girl Corrinne is truly obnoxious, but her attitude is amusing, and her evolution, although much too facile, is at least entertaining. (Fiction. 12 & up)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061978845
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/08/2011
Pages:
291
Sales rank:
198,703
Product dimensions:
5.16(w) x 7.92(h) x 0.74(d)
Age Range:
13 - 17 Years

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