Where Mathematics Come from: How the Embodied Mind Brings Mathematics into Being

Overview


This book is about mathematical ideas, about what mathematics means-and why. Abstract ideas, for the most part, arise via conceptual metaphor-metaphorical ideas projecting from the way we function in the everyday physical world. Where Mathematics Comes From argues that conceptual metaphor plays a central role in mathematical ideas within the cognitive unconscious-from arithmetic and algebra to sets and logic to infinity in all of its forms.
Read ...
See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$26.99
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$29.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (17) from $7.79   
  • New (8) from $26.19   
  • Used (9) from $7.79   
Sending request ...

Overview


This book is about mathematical ideas, about what mathematics means-and why. Abstract ideas, for the most part, arise via conceptual metaphor-metaphorical ideas projecting from the way we function in the everyday physical world. Where Mathematics Comes From argues that conceptual metaphor plays a central role in mathematical ideas within the cognitive unconscious-from arithmetic and algebra to sets and logic to infinity in all of its forms.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Science News
. . .[a] groundbreaking book. . .
Science News
A groundbreaking book.
American Scholar
Adds body heat to the cold and beautiful abstractions of mathematics.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This groundbreaking exploration by linguist Lakoff (co-author, with Mark Johnson, of Metaphors We Live By) and psychologist N ez (co-editor of Reclaiming Cognition) brings two decades of insights from cognitive science to bear on the nature of human mathematical thought, beginning with the basic, pre-verbal ability to do simple arithmetic on quantities of four or less, and encompassing set theory, multiple forms of infinity and the demystification of more enigmatic mathematical truths. Their purpose is to begin laying the foundations for a truly scientific understanding of human mathematical thought, grounded in processes common to all human cognition. They find that four distinct but related processes metaphorically structure basic arithmetic: object collection, object construction, using a measuring stick and moving along a path. By carefully unfolding these primitive examples and then building upon them, the authors take readers on a dazzling excursion without sacrificing the rigor of their exposition. Lakoff and N ez directly challenge the most cherished myths about the nature of mathematical truth, offering instead a fresh, profound, empirically grounded insight into the meaning of mathematical ideas. This revolutionary account is bound to garner major attention in the scientific press--but it remains a very challenging read that lends itself mostly to those with a strong interest in either math or cognitive science. (Nov. 15) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
Two cognitive scientists examine the structure of mathematical ideas, what mathematics means, and why. Lakoff (linguistics, U. of California, Berkeley) and N<'u><~n>ez (psychology, U. of Freiburg) believe that conceptual metaphor plays a central, defining role in mathematical ideas, from simple arithmetic and algebra to sets, logic, and infinity. They argue that understanding the ideas implicit in mathematics, especially the metaphorical ideas, demystifies mathematics so that it makes more sense. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
From The Critics
The only math ideas humans can have are ideas invented by the human brain: Where Mathematics Comes From argues that a conceptual metaphor plays a defining role in math ideas within the unconscious, drawing important connections between mathematical ideas and what they mean. It's the first serious study of the cognitive science of where math ideas originate: college-level audiences will find it involving.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780465037711
  • Publisher: Basic Books
  • Publication date: 8/14/2001
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 492
  • Sales rank: 537,039
  • Product dimensions: 7.41 (w) x 9.22 (h) x 1.12 (d)

Meet the Author


George Lakoff is Professor of Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley. He was a founder of the generative semantics movements in linguistics in the 1960s and of the field of cognitive linguistics in the 1970s, and one of the developers of the neural theory of language in the 1980s and '90s. He is the co-author, with Mark Johnson, of Metaphors We Live By and Philosophy in the Flesh.Rafael Nuñez is currently at the Department of Psychology of the University of Freiburg, and is a research associate of the University of California, Berkeley. He is the co-editor of Reclaiming Cognition: The Primacy of Action, Intention and Emotion.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)