Where the Rivers Run North

Where the Rivers Run North

5.0 2
by Sam Morton
     
 

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ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND TRAVELERS had crossed the Oregon Trail during the gold rush of 1849. Even the most backwoods warrior understood what that meant: disease, death, and conflict with the whites. As a result of the Treaty of 1851, some Indians were convinced that the country to the north-called Absaraka-might be a better option for a home range. At the very least,

Overview

ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND TRAVELERS had crossed the Oregon Trail during the gold rush of 1849. Even the most backwoods warrior understood what that meant: disease, death, and conflict with the whites. As a result of the Treaty of 1851, some Indians were convinced that the country to the north-called Absaraka-might be a better option for a home range. At the very least, it held the promise of less trouble from the whites. The danger from other tribes was another matter.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780979084102
Publisher:
Sam Morton
Publication date:
07/28/2007
Pages:
580
Product dimensions:
6.32(w) x 9.26(h) x 1.76(d)

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Where the Rivers Run North 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I live in the land where the rivers run North. Defined as 'Absaraka' in Morton's book, it primarily encompasses the horse country of Northeastern Wyoming, Southeastern Montana, and Western South Dakota. This is an epic story covering four eras in the history of the horse, beginning with their use by the Plains Indians, as depicted in the story of Crazy Horse, of the Lakota Sioux---probably the most famous Indian who ever lived. From there it moves to the wild and wide-open town of Miles City, Montana as it was only a half dozen years after the tragic Battle of the Little Bighorn. Here was first meet Oliver Henry 'Noll' Wallop, a man of English nobility, and follow him to his first horse ranch on Otter Creek, Montana, and on to the famous horse and cattle ranch he later established in the Big Horn Mountains of Wyoming. The book, researched over 7 years by the author, Sam Morton, though labeled as fiction, is a historical novel of fact, anecdote and fiction which captures the fun and legends which are the spirit of the people, animals and the land itself. The thread that runs through the book is that of horses of all kinds Indian ponys cowboy and ranch horses those used for racing, polo, rodeo and the hundreds of thousands sold to the remount for use in the Boer War and World Wars I and II. Not since Teddy 'Blue' Abbott came up the Texas Trail in 'We Pointed Them North' has there been such a depiction of the great fun, courage, and individuality of those horse lovers who people the land where the Rivers Run North.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago