Where There's Love, There's Hate

Where There's Love, There's Hate

by Adolfo Bioy Casares, Silvina Ocampo
     
 

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A witty yet gripping pastiche of murder mysteries set in an Argentine seaside resort, peppered with literary allusions

In seaside Bosque de Mar, guests at the Hotel Central are struck by double misfortune: the mysterious death of one of their party, and an investigation headed by the physician, writer and insufferable busybody, Dr. Humberto Huberman.

Overview

A witty yet gripping pastiche of murder mysteries set in an Argentine seaside resort, peppered with literary allusions

In seaside Bosque de Mar, guests at the Hotel Central are struck by double misfortune: the mysterious death of one of their party, and an investigation headed by the physician, writer and insufferable busybody, Dr. Humberto Huberman. When quiet, young translator Mary is found dead on the first night of Huberman's stay, he quickly appoints himself leader of an inquiry that will see blame apportioned in turn to each and every guest—including Mary's own sister—and culminating in a wild, wind-blown reconnaissance mission to the nearby shipwreck, the Joseph K.

Never before translated into English, Where There's Love, There's Hate is both genuinely suspenseful mystery fiction and an ingenious pastiche of the genre, the only novel co-written by two towering figures of Latin American literature. Famously friends and collaborators of Jorge Luis Borges, husband and wife Bioy Casares and Ocampo combine their gifts to produce a novel that's captivating, unashamedly erudite and gloriously witty.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In the first English translation of their 1946 novella, husband and wife Casares and Ocampo send up the conventions of the detective novel. A vacationing doctor, who insists, "may nobody call me an un-reliable narrator," weasels his way into solving a murder at a seaside Argentinian resort. When a young woman, Mary, is found dead at the hotel, Dr. Huberman, presuming himself to be "the domi-nant intellect" on the scene, takes the lead in an investigation that at points turns on each of the book's characters. No one is immune from blame; anyone—including Mary's sister Emilia and Emilia's fian-cée—could plausibly be the killer. The sinuous mystery is further complicated by Huberman's narra-tion, which is colored by his arrogance and is far less reliable than he believes. Casares and Ocampo drolly mock the genre itself as Huberman claims "complicated crimes were the province of literature; reality was more banal." The pair's only collaboration turns out to be a witty and erudite take on the clichéd mystery. (May)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781612191508
Publisher:
Melville House Publishing
Publication date:
05/14/2013
Series:
Neversink Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
112
Sales rank:
1,250,807
Product dimensions:
4.90(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author

ADOLFO BIOY CASARES (1914-99) is one of the most important literary figures of his native Argentina, most famous as the author of The Invention of Morel (1940). He won the French Legion of Honour and the Miguel de Cervantes Prize, was a lifelong friend of Borges, and married to Silvina Ocampo.

SILVINA OCAMPO
(1903-1993) was an award-winning poet and short story writer, also well known for her children's fiction. She was born in Buenos Aires and later studied art in Paris. Together with her husband Adolfo Bioy Casares and Jorge Luis Borges, she edited the famous 1940 Antología de la literature fantástica.

SUZANNE JILL LEVINE (translator and introduction) is the author of numerous studies in Latin American literature and the translator of works by Adolfo Bioy Casares, Jorge Luis Borges, Guillermo Cabrera Infante, and Manuel Puig, among other distinguished writers. Levine's most recent book is Manuel Puig and the Spider Woman: His Life and Fictions. She is a professor in the Spanish Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

JESSICA ERNST POWELL has translated works by numerous Latin American writers, including Jorge Luis Borges, César Vallejo, Ernesto Cardenal, and Carmen Boullosa. She is the recipient of a 2011 National Endowment for the Arts fellowship for her translation of Antonio Benítez Rojo's Woman in Battle Dress.

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