Where White Men Fear to Tread: The Autobiography of Russell Means

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Overview

Russell Means is the most controversial Indian leader of our time. Where White Men Fear to Tread is the well-detailed, first-hand story of his life so far, in which he has done everything possible to dramatize and justify the Native American aim of self-determination, such as storming Mount Rushmore, seizing Plymouth Rock, running for President in 1988, and—most notoriously—leading a 71-day takeover of Wounded Knee, South Dakota, in 1973. This visionary autobiography by one of our most magnetic personalities...

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Overview

Russell Means is the most controversial Indian leader of our time. Where White Men Fear to Tread is the well-detailed, first-hand story of his life so far, in which he has done everything possible to dramatize and justify the Native American aim of self-determination, such as storming Mount Rushmore, seizing Plymouth Rock, running for President in 1988, and—most notoriously—leading a 71-day takeover of Wounded Knee, South Dakota, in 1973. This visionary autobiography by one of our most magnetic personalities will fascinate, educate, and inspire. As Dee Brown has written, "A reading of Means's story is essential for any clear understanding of American Indians during the last half of the twentieth century."

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"It's impossible to stop reading [Mean's] gripping autobiography . . . Few readers will leave the book without feeling profoundly altered by the authenticity of Mean's story. It's American history—warts, wounds, and all."—San Francisco Chronicle Book Review

"Mean's tale gives one a visceral understanding of today's Indians, their ancestors, and the many betrayals they have suffered."—Chicago Tribune

"Not since war chiefs such as Geronimo or Crazy Horse has an Indian leader so polarized the American public as Russell Means."—Dallas Morning News

"One of the biggest, baddest, meanest, angriest, most famous American Indian activists of the late twentieth century."—The Washington Post

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312147617
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 11/28/1996
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 592
  • Sales rank: 133,173
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.23 (h) x 1.69 (d)

Meet the Author

Russell Means, born an Oglala/Lakota in 1939, was raised on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation near the Black Hills, and then in Vallejo, California. Now a grandfather with twenty-two grandchildren, Means divides his time between Chinle, Navajo Nation, Arizona, and Porcupine, North Dakota.

Marvin J. Wolf is an award-winning writer and member of the American Society of Journalists and Authors. He lives in Los Angeles.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Pt. I Genesis 1939-1964
Prologue: Feather Necklace 3
1 Tiyospaye 9
2 Early Years 23
3 Vallejo 28
4 San Leandro 45
5 Winnebago 51
6 Dealing 56
7 The Irish Pup 66
8 Fatherhood and the "Hustle" 76
9 San Francisco 93
Pt. II The Making of a Militant 1964-1973
10 A Second Name: Cio 105
11 Grandpa John and Dad 121
12 The Intertribal Car 130
13 The Rosebud 136
14 Cleveland 141
15 The American Indian Movement 149
16 Handpicked Apples 162
17 Mayflower II 174
18 The Sun Dance 179
19 Moses Cleaveland 191
20 Raymond Yellow Thunder 194
21 Red Ribbon Grand Juries 202
22 Schism 208
23 "Works For The People" 213
24 The Trail of Broken Treaties 222
25 Scourge of the Plains 236
26 The Path to Wounded Knee 249
Pt. III Our Struggle 1973-1978
27 The Siege of Wounded Knee 257
28 Hunkering Down 274
29 White Lies 284
30 Waiting for Trial 294
31 The Trial 299
32 Political Theater 311
33 A Government of, by, and for the Liars 322
34 Ordeals by Trials 333
35 The Sioux Falls Massacre 343
36 On Trial for Murder 353
37 Sobriety 364
38 The Longest Walk 374
39 Prison 382
Pt. IV Rebirth 1978-1992
40 Black Hills Alliance 397
41 Tatuye Topa Najinwin 403
42 Yellow Thunder Camp 407
43 Catch the Bear 419
44 Paha Sapa Sun Dance 428
45 Fighting among Ourselves 432
46 Larry Flynt 442
47 Gloria 448
48 Nicaragua 459
49 Moonies and Libertarians 477
50 Indian Banana Republics 489
51 The "Outlaw" Navajo Government 499
52 The Movies 510
53 Good-bye, Columbus Day 518
54 Treatment 523
Epilogue 533
Appendix 545
Index 555
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2004

    Russell Means : A Man of honor and integrity

    As a white man, I am ashamed to say the first time I heard of Russell Means was when I saw 'Last of the Mohicans'. I thought he was a full-time actor. That compelled me to buy the book 'Where White Men Fear To Tread'. After reading the book, I respect and admire Mr. Means for what he is doing on behalf of his people. Fighting the U.S. Government after decades of oppression has given me a great deal of respect for Mr. Means and the Indian nation in general. Continued success to Mr. Means for the fight for freedom and respect for his people.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2002

    Powerful, Insightful and well written...

    "Where White Men Fear to Tread" is a book that will stand alone in my heart as one of the best books I have ever read. It was given to me by a fellow member of the Native American Church while I was attending in New Mexico. I felt the urge to read, read and read more as my eyes took in his words! I would carry it everywhere. It gave me so much insight as to how Russell Means grew up, all the conflicts he had to deal with and all the lies he was told. The part about the Fort Laramie treaty and how the government took the land back from the Lakotas, Nakotas and Dakota is disgraceful in my eyes. Then they have the nerve to call us Indian givers. This book will open up your eyes to what really happens outside your prefect world. It is time for a wake up call. Also in closing I would like to say my hopes and prayers are to Russell on his path to become Governor of New Mexico. This book shall breath life into you and make you smile, shake your head in understanding and shake your fist at the way the government treats the Native Americans. Mitaku Oyasin

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2002

    A True Warrior

    The 500+ pages of this book appear intimidating at first, but this is a book that is hard to stop reading. I bought this book after visiting the Pine Ridge Reservation. Means paints a vivid portrait of life on the reservation. The 1973 conflict with the federal government at Wounded Knee is probably the highlight of the book. Means has been shot three times, stabbed, and has been in countless fights for his beliefs. He is a man who walks the walk, which is rare these days.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2001

    Incredible,Informative, Powerful

    So the critics say, Russell Means is only in it for attention? They say, his historical facts are all wrong? And I guess your history is perfect...I guess Columbus discovered America. I guess Russell Means didn't get stabbed, shot at, beaten, jailed in the 70s for causes, but because he wanted attention. What happened to intelligent critics, there are none, that's why they have jobs as critics. Read this book yourself and you will find the passion of one man who has stood up for his family, his people, and his beliefs. You will learn a lot about life, spirtuality, American History, and Justice. To me, I learned a lot from this book regarding the Government, World Culture, and Sprituality. This is a great book about an activist. So what if he acts in movies? So what he seeks attention, he has a very important cause that needs attention. You will notice that the crtics don't mention Means's TREATY schools, and other organziations he has started and works with.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2000

    A Man of Integrity

    Russell Means' book is an eye-opening account of the injustices suffered by American Indians, even today. Unfortunately, because the media rarely chronicles reservation life, few of us know what Means calls 'American Apartheid.' Oh, well: 'Out of Sight, Out of Mind' is too prevalent an attitude in America.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2013

    It is unfortunate that I only read this book after Mr. Means pas

    It is unfortunate that I only read this book after Mr. Means passing last year. a remarable tome about life for the Naitve American. A must eead for those who wish more of thestruggles of the American Indian in the latter half of the 20th century, a struggle that continues today.

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