Which Comes First, Cardio or Weights?: Fitness Myths, Training Truths, and Other Surprising Discoveries from the Science of Exercise

Which Comes First, Cardio or Weights?: Fitness Myths, Training Truths, and Other Surprising Discoveries from the Science of Exercise

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by Alex Hutchinson
     
 

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In Which Comes First, Cardio or Weights? Alex Hutchinson, a physicist, award-winning journalist, and contributing editor of Popular Mechanics magazine, reveals the little-known and often surprising truths that science has uncovered about exercise. A book that ranges from cardio and weights to competition and weight loss, here are fascinating facts

Overview

In Which Comes First, Cardio or Weights? Alex Hutchinson, a physicist, award-winning journalist, and contributing editor of Popular Mechanics magazine, reveals the little-known and often surprising truths that science has uncovered about exercise. A book that ranges from cardio and weights to competition and weight loss, here are fascinating facts and practical tips for fitness buffs, competitive athletes, and popular science fans alike.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This wide-ranging book covers far more than its title promises. Beyond the cardio/weight debate, Hutchinson covers fitness gear, physiology, flexibility, aging, injury, weight management, and the mental aspects of exercise in this question-and-answer-style offering. Hutchinson, editor at Popular Mechanics and Canadian Running and columnist for the Toronto Globe and Mail, is certainly a subject matter expert and a thorough researcher, clearly explaining scientific concepts for the average reader. He doesn't promote snake-oil paths to fitness, but rather promises and provides up-to-date, research-based health and fitness news. He touches on trends like barefoot running and Wii workouts and includes fitness oddities like the risk of water intoxication. End-of-chapter cheat sheets and helpful boxes, charts, and graphics will be more immediately salient to most readers than literature-review-centric body text, which sometimes feels prohibitively citation-laden. This book will work best when occasionally dipped into or when referenced in answering a specific question; a cover-to-cover read feels dense and overlong. Still, it will also be enjoyed by cerebral athletes who want the why behind the workouts. (June)
Amby Burfoot
“Authoritative and easy to use. . . . This book answers all the big questions.”
BC Living
“Once in a while in the crowded fitness & health genre a book comes out that stands out from rest...[I]f there’s only one fitness book you ever buy this should be the one.”
Kirkus Reviews

A comprehensive "evidence based" guide on exercise, health and performance for aspiring athletes and pros alike.

Hutchinson, a journalist and physicist, offers a refreshing perspective on fitness and well-being. Instead of adding to the list of manifestos on the perfect fitness regimen, the author sets aside conventional wisdom for scientific exploration and invites readers to form their own opinions. From the outset, Hutchinson clearly states his intentions: "This is an important point: there's no single 'best' exercise program or technique that applies to everyone. You'll have to take into account your background, current level of fitness and goals in designing an appropriate workout regimen—not to mention more subtle considerations like the types of activity you enjoy. After all, the most effective program is the one you can stick with!" With that in mind, the author leads readers on a path that methodically disentangles myth from fact regarding exercise, performance and healthy living. But Hutchinson isn't only concerned with what works and what doesn't; he's interested in the why as well. The author's scientific training serves him well in referencing hundreds of peer-reviewed journal articles and more than 100 interviews with researchers worldwide. However, he carefully balances the scientific data with a blend of tips and helpful diagrams. For example, readers may enjoy learning the mind-body connection and how listening to music or watching TV can affect a workout. Each chapter closes with a "cheat sheet," a clearly defined list of the key points.

Factual, informative and empowering.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062092083
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/24/2011
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
178,059
File size:
5 MB

What People are saying about this

Amby Burfoot
“Authoritative and easy to use. . . . This book answers all the big questions.”

Meet the Author

Alex Hutchinson is a contributing editor at Popular Mechanics magazine, senior editor at Canadian Running magazine, and columnist for the Toronto Globe and Mail. He holds a master's in journalism from Columbia and a Ph.D. in physics from Cambridge, and he did his post-doctoral research with the U.S. National Security Agency.

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Which Comes First--Cardio or Weights? 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Gigs More than 1 year ago
The entire time I was reading this I would recite facts to anyone who was sitting by me. Its a fascinating read and addresses the many myth's we all know as fitness enthusiasts.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Since starting Mark Verstegen's Core Performance program a year ago, I've developed a serious interest in exercise. I stumbled across one of Alex Hutchinson's helpful (and recommended) blogs: Sweat Science. That's where I heard about this book. Mr. Hutchinson uses a Q & A format to address over a hundred debatable issues facing people who exercise regularly. The questions are independent although grouped according to subject matter, such as "Nutrition and Hydration." This is great for those who have time only for snippets of reading (bathroom reading, for example). High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a particular interest of mine lately. I see it as way to replace five hours a week of traditional cardio (aerobic) training with just one hour. The author gives a nice description of HIIT and succinctly and accurately summarizes the science in support of it, along with the risks. Mr. Hutchinson typically answers controversial questions with the best available evidence from current scientific research. Rarely, he has to depend simply on expert concensus, which is less reliable. I envision a new edition every five years or so. The book is easy to read. The style is congenial and witty. Contrary to a recent publishing trend, the font size is reasonably large. The audience for this is folks who have made a commitment to make regular physical activity part of their lifestyle. Trust me, I'm a doctor: the guys at the gym and Internet sources are quite often wrong on these issues. If you refuse to do more than just stroll in the neighborhood for 30 minutes a day, you don't need the book. But I urge you to consider challenging yourself to do more. --Steve Parker, M.D., author of "The Advanced Mediterranean Diet: Lose Weight, Feel Better, Live Longer (2nd Edition)"
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