Which Is Round? Which Is Bigger?

Overview

This deceptively simple concept book prompts the reader to compare pairs of objects and then choose which one has a particular attribute. At first the answer seems obvious ? until the page is turned to reveal a delightful twist! The thoughtful format and witty illustrations give away the answer to the question, Which is a hit book?
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Overview

This deceptively simple concept book prompts the reader to compare pairs of objects and then choose which one has a particular attribute. At first the answer seems obvious ? until the page is turned to reveal a delightful twist! The thoughtful format and witty illustrations give away the answer to the question, Which is a hit book?
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Claudia Mills
This charming import from Japan poses a series of deceptively simple questions to young readers in a format designed to encourage probing questions and discourage complacent answers. The text asks, of a completely spherical apple and an elongated armadillo: "Which is round?" Well, the apple—duh! But turn the page, and the apple has been munched down to its skinny core, while the armadillo is curled tightly, head to toe, into a perfect ball. Each spread follows the same pattern, with each smug answer subsequently dislodged. "Which one is red?" Red-skinned apple or green-skinned watermelon? Ah, but cut open the two fruits, and we find the prize for redness going instead to the melon. "Which one is faster?" Creeping snail or jogging dog? But what if the dog comes to a standstill to watch as the snail rolls down a steep hill? Mamada's bold, bright graphics and teasing queries invite children to problematize the seemingly obvious, in a playful exploration for young philosophers-in-training. Reviewer: Claudia Mills, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
PreS-K—Facing pages offer two items to compare. An apple and a hedgehog-which is round? After turning the page, the question is repeated, but the apple is down to the core and the hedgehog has rolled into its protective ball. The next spread features a duck and a peacock and asks which is bigger. Other comparisons include longer and faster. The question "What do you think?" creates opportunity for discussion. Simple text and color cartoon animals on solid backgrounds allow children to focus on the investigations.—Gay Lynn Van Vleck, Henrico County Library, Glen Allen, VA
Kirkus Reviews
Playful or confusing? The illustrations by Japanese designer Mamada in this comparisons book are charmingly naïve, but their conceptual twists tend to beg more questions than they answer. The premise is that nothing is as it appears. An apple is round until it is half-eaten; a pangolin, while not normally round like an apple, becomes round when it curls into a ball. A duck is bigger than a small peacock--until the peacock is in full display mode. The cat is higher up the tree than the mouse--until the tree bends and the cat is lower. This could lead to an interesting discussion with a 3-year-old--or could cause endless confusion, especially since some of the concepts are not really accurate. A snake is still longer than an ant, even when many ants form a long line. In one spread, "Which one is faster," a dog beats the snail walking up the hill, but the snail rolls down the hill faster than the dog can walk. The response might challenge the reasoning abilities of even the smartest 2- to 4-year-olds and lead to a sense of dissatisfaction. Used in an elementary classroom, however, it could prompt fruitful discussion. Ultimately, the book presents concepts that are too mature for its apparent age group to grasp without guidance. (Picture book. 4-6)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781554539734
  • Publisher: Kids Can Press, Limited
  • Publication date: 3/1/2013
  • Pages: 24
  • Sales rank: 561,610
  • Age range: 2 - 6 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.10 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Author-illustrator Mineko Mamada has published several children's books in her native Japan, where she also works as a graphic designer. Which Is Round? Which Is Bigger? is her first book to be translated into English. Mineko lives in Tokyo.

Author-illustrator Mineko Mamada has published several children's books in her native Japan, where she also works as a graphic designer. Which Is Round? Which Is Bigger? is her first book to be translated into English. Mineko lives in Tokyo.

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