While the World Watched: A Birmingham Bombing Survivor Comes of Age during the Civil Rights Movement [NOOK Book]

Overview

On September 15, 1963, a Klan-planted bomb went off in the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Fourteen-year-old Carolyn Maull was just a few feet away when the bomb exploded, killing four of her friends in the girl’s rest room she had just exited. It was one of the seminal moments in the Civil Rights movement, a sad day in American history . . . and the turning point in a young girl’s life.
While the World Watched is a poignant and gripping eyewitness account of...
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While the World Watched: A Birmingham Bombing Survivor Comes of Age during the Civil Rights Movement

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Overview

On September 15, 1963, a Klan-planted bomb went off in the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Fourteen-year-old Carolyn Maull was just a few feet away when the bomb exploded, killing four of her friends in the girl’s rest room she had just exited. It was one of the seminal moments in the Civil Rights movement, a sad day in American history . . . and the turning point in a young girl’s life.
While the World Watched is a poignant and gripping eyewitness account of life in the Jim Crow South—from the bombings, riots and assassinations to the historic marches and triumphs that characterized the Civil Rights movement.
A uniquely moving exploration of how racial relations have evolved over the past 5 decades, While the World Watched is an incredible testament to how far we’ve come and how far we have yet to go.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781414353036
  • Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers
  • Publication date: 2/1/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 164,884
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Carolyn Maull McKinstry is a survivor of the Civil Rights struggle and an eyewitness to the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing. As a teenager, she marched under Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and bravely faced Bull Connor's German shepherds and stinging fire hoses during the battle for equal rights in her hometown of Birmingham, Alabama.

Now, nearly fifty years after the bombing, Carolyn is still an active member of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, serves as president of the Sixteenth Street Foundation, and works full time spreading her message of racial reconciliation.

A highly sought-after speaker, she has appeared on Oprah, 20/20,CNN,and MSNBC, and portions of her story have been featured in Life magazine and USA Today.She has made numerous television and documentary appearances, including Spike Lee's documentary Four Little Girls; Soledad O'Brien's Black in America; Brian Williams's Shades of Progress, Shadows of Hate; and Family Network's We Shall Not Be Moved.

Carolyn has addressed audiences in New Delhi, Mumbai, Barcelona, and the Italian Baptist Evangelical Union in Rome, as well as the Rosa Parks Museum, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., and numerous colleges and universities.

She recently received her master of divinity from Beeson Divinity School in Birmingham, Alabama, where she currently lives with her husband, Jerome.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 62 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(40)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(8)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 42 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 11, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great eye opening book!

    Imagine going to church on Sunday, walking up the stairs to the sanctuary. Seconds later, a bomb explodes right where you just walked. This is the story of Carolyn Maull McKinstry. She records her personal account of the 16th st Birmingham Church Bombing, along with many other personal happenings of racial injustice. She wrote everything from her view, what it was like to almost be killed, how terrifying it was to wake up to the sound of a bomb, and how hard it was to forgive the men who had done the bigoted act. She spoke of her longing to go to a public swimming pool, or an amusement park closed to people of other ethnicity. An eye opening book indeed.

    I loved this book, I thought it was a very well written book, and it really opened my eyes to dastardly segregation of the 1960s. I could not believe the racial norm, how hate filled white people were; it was almost as if I had opened a time capsule to a time where no one but white people had value. I learned so much in this book that I never knew. So many colored people were killed, yet rarely was anyone convicted of murder. One of the things I found interesting was that nearly every person who had murdered someone without being caught had died of a sickness before another trial could be held.

    Pros: I loved reading her view on the important civil rights dates, and it was very eye opening. It was a phenomenal story of overcoming hatred; on both sides of the spectrum.
    Con: The only thing I disliked was not actually the book; rather, it was the layout. I did not love that the speeches were scattered in between the paragraphs. I liked reading the speeches, but it was hard to stop in the middle of Carolyn's sentence, read a speech, and then pick up where you left off.

    Overall, I loved it! It was a great book, with a great story of forgiveness weaved into every chapter.

    I would recommend this book to anyone over 15, {or a little younger, depending on the maturity and the gender} It was quite graphic in some areas, but it probably wouldn't affect a boy as much as a girl, and some 12 year olds are just tough :)

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 10, 2011

    Very inspiring read

    As the World Watched tells the story of Carolyn Maull McKinstry's life growing up during the height of the Civil Rights torn south. From the first page, the reader is given a glimpse into what it was like to live as an African American in Birmingham, Alabama in the 1960s. The central event of the book is the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in1963, but McKinstry details many other incidents of Civil Rights unrest in the deep south.

    I really enjoyed this book. McKinstry's writing style was easy to follow, and I found myself gaining a better understanding of the depth of the Civil Rights problem in the south. I especially appreciated her candid discussion of her faith in God, and how forgiving those who wronged her, changed her life. The one thing that I did not like was the back and forth style at the beginning of the book, going from discussing different characters and events, to the day of the bombing, and back. It would have been easier to follow if she had just started from the beginning and led up to the bombing.

    Overall, it was a great book, and I would highly recommend it to anyone who loves history and desires a deeper understanding of historical events.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2012

    Awesome

    Cool story

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2012

    crappy book

    Not a good book not entertaining

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2012

    Highly recommended -- A journey of healing for all of us

    This is an excellent documentation of the tragic event that brought so many of us to our knees in disbelief. The nation was forced to face the ugliness of a society filled with hate. The writer takes us on her journey of understanding and reconciliation and thereby reminds us that only love can heal a broken people. Thank you

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 6, 2014

    Intense and Educational. This beautiful lady gives us a personal

    Intense and Educational. This beautiful lady gives us a personal glimpse into a tragic day and era, as well as a brave look into her own pain and devastation, so that we can see her healing and gain insight into forgiveness. The message is one of love and reconciliation, after opening our eyes to the evils of the racial situation. The events are depicted in a professional and compelling way with her co-author. The quotes from speeches and reports enhance the narrative. They give it more historical interest. The photos are illuminating and some are chilling. They help make the account more real. Despite some repetition, this is an excellent and worthwhile book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 27, 2014

    I was only three years old when the 16th Street Baptist Church w

    I was only three years old when the 16th Street Baptist Church was bombed.  Combined with the fact I grew up in Wisconsin and North Dakota, I had no idea of the details of this tragedy, much less the big picture of the life of black people in the South and the Civil Rights Movement.  I have not yet read two biographies of Martin Luther King, Jr. that sit on my shelf, but I had at least heard of the bombing.  Carolyn's story filled a huge hole in my consciousness of the events that have shaped our country.  It's the story of Carolyn's experiences that day and how her life was forever impacted by them - but she places her experiences within the context of the larger Civil Rights struggles all over the South.  I'm very grateful she put these things into words.  

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2014

    Meh

    Meh Meh Meh Meh

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2014

    Lol

    # Twerk team

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2014

    Its cool

    Omg yall got to read ir

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2014

    Yur mom f*%&$# me last night

    It felt good so i am going to do it again tonight

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2014

    Look here

    Do this no .ore people its not nice to talk about people derek

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2014

    Hello how r u doing

    Hhhhhhheeeeeeeeedlllllllllllooooooooo

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2014

    Hi justice

    I agree with you 100%

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2014

    Read me i am justice

    Hi i think vthi book is raciest to black people the clan is mean they just like blew up gods house now tell me how disrespectfull that is to blacks



    Ps their is soe blacks u cant trust

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2014

    Hello matt g

    Hello i wanna play a game look to your left you need to kill that man gary p look to your right derek thats me

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2014

    Bedobedobedobedobedobedorrcgffrhvdfhfvggtyjbvddgtrtyyjvf jhfgfbfvhfhfxdghhcfghvccgvgvvhtfhygbugfuhggugbhfvcgyuug fdgdjdgudhrhfjcujfvfjdyudgsggnfyghfhfhfffggfxvggggggggggggggggggggggggggggkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkjkkkklkkkkkkkjkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkrkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk..............gyyryhryjhrfhyrvjfhfsguzbbnmmrbfundtjyfbeyogzrhudbfguffrhifsb.o(reg)hxfjyfhdjdjjjdjdhffjjcjfffffhfhdefgdhdhfdydddxdthdwhhddvhfhddhhycgufcssfghdgtfghfrhufffghytfghhfggvfgfdtfvvgythjfjfffffjhfhhhhhhhhhhhuh

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2014

    Intelligent & loving memoir.

    This book had to be difficult to write for this author, but she did a wonderful service to our understanding of that terrible time. Very interesting and informative.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2013

    Best book ever

    I just finished this book and really liked it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2013

    Breath taking reacount yet it left some things out.

    I loved the story but felt more or less, leftout. THE DETAILS ARE SO FOGGY. The diction is very comeforting and has a distinct sothern tone. Only a few gramatical errors throw the reader off and afectively suck them out of their mental reading state.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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