While We've Still Got Feet [NOOK Book]

Overview


Familiar to listeners of National Public Radio, David Budbill is beloved by legions for straightforward poems dispatched from his hermitage on Judevine Mountain. Inspired by classical Chinese hermit poets, he follows tradition but cannot escape the complications and struggles of a modern solitary existence. Loneliness, aging and political outrage are addressed in poems that value honesty and simplicity and deplore pretension.

For more than three decades, David Budbill has lived...

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While We've Still Got Feet

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Overview


Familiar to listeners of National Public Radio, David Budbill is beloved by legions for straightforward poems dispatched from his hermitage on Judevine Mountain. Inspired by classical Chinese hermit poets, he follows tradition but cannot escape the complications and struggles of a modern solitary existence. Loneliness, aging and political outrage are addressed in poems that value honesty and simplicity and deplore pretension.

For more than three decades, David Budbill has lived on a remote mountain in northern Vermont writing poems, reading Chinese classics, tending to his garden and, of course, working on his website. Budbill has been featured more than any other author on Garrison Keillor’s The Writer’s Almanac.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
A follow-up to Moment to Moment (1999), Budbill's latest poetry collection resumes his decades-long meditation on his reclusive aesthete's life in rural Vermont ("I cut wood and garden, listen for a poem") and the ancient Chinese poets who inspire him. His plain-spoken, almost willfully artless poems move from the profoundly simple (the elderly become "visions of the death they move toward") to the simply obvious ("Just because you have what you want today/ doesn't mean you will tomorrow"). In attempting to escape the greed, vanity, lust, ambition, and brutal politics of the outside world, Budbill seems mindful of little else, self-righteously scolding others as well as himself. Imagistic detail is rare, and when he speaks out against U.S. military adventurism ("There is still nowhere I can hide from the way/ the Emperor and his Court beat up on the world"), he does so obliquely. But though his observations are often mundane, the tension between his spiritual ideals and worldly inclinations (Budbill maintains his own web site) is candidly proffered and will strike a chord with many. For larger poetry collections.-Fred Muratori, Cornell Univ. Lib., Ithaca, NY Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781619320611
  • Publisher: Copper Canyon Press
  • Publication date: 12/4/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 132
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author


For the past thirty-five years, David Budbill has lived on a remote mountain in northern Vermont. His awards include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and National Endowment for the Arts, as well as a lifetime achievement award from the Vermont Arts Council. A former commentator on NPR's All Things Considered, his poetry is featured frequently on Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac.
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Table of Contents

Gama Sennin 5
Thirty-five years 6
Drink a cup of loneliness 7
Thirty-five miles to a traffic light 8
In the tradition 9
Up here 10
Directions 11
Irrelevant and useless 12
Weather report 13
Smoke and ash 17
Inward 18
Judevine Mountain built a house 19
Perched in these green mountains 20
I've got my father's ashes on my desk 21
The first, the greatest, the best 22
All this striving to succeed will make you a failure for sure 23
What is ambition compared to death? 24
Kim Ku-yong says 25
All this ego 26
A dream 27
Gandhi said once 28
November again again 29
Just now 30
End of November 31
Winter is the best time 35
The mind no-mind brought to mind 36
Yang Wan-li says 37
Same old thing 38
Straight like iron 39
The emperor 40
Easy as pie 41
The warrior's question 42
If a Bodhisattva 43
February 13, 2003 44
It's different now 45
Reading Olav Hauge in the dead of winter 46
Two views of the same place 47
Leaving home 48
The woodcutter 49
What would I do without her? or, the hypocrite tells the truth for once 50
Another winter night 51
Thirty-five years alone 55
Well, most of the time anyway 56
Wild monk or? 57
What is going on here? 58
Do something with your body 59
Dialogue 60
The mountain recluse asks himself a question 61
The beautiful people 62
Again just now 63
He grieves 64
The world left behind 65
Ugly Americans 66
The rich are never satisfied 67
Here and there : a sunny day, April 2003 68
Sympathy for the poor 69
April 3, 2003 70
Love song 71
Another spring 72
Birth and death in the dooryard 73
In the year in which I was fifty-seven 74
Written while riding the Q train across Manhattan Bridge into Chinatown in a city I once called home; or, self-pity in the city 75
Look at her now 76
Now look at me 77
Going home 78
Judevine Mountain's siren song : upon returning home from the city 79
What it takes 83
Summer's here 84
Don't speak in the abstract 85
Praise for ambition and lust 86
After a painting by Tu Chin called The scholar Fu Sheng in a garden 87
With Hui-neng 88
The old tree 89
The way is like language 90
No escape 91
Litany for the emperor 92
Where I went to school 93
The evolution of Soph 94
When Han Shan was twenty-nine 95
Questions 96
My father is with me 97
The circle is unbroken 98
Ryokan says 99
Lies 100
Walking meditation 101
Glad to be who they are 102
My father 103
Like smoke from our campfire 104
Too busy 105
The busy man speaks 106
Poem with a quotation from Mr. Lin 107
Of two minds 108
Green Mountain woodchuck landscape haiku 109
Right now 110
Often I think I'd rather 111
The end of August 112
After looking at an anonymous Sung-dynasty painting called Lake retreat among willow trees 115
A little story about an ancient Chinese emperor 116
Yellow leaves - red leaves 117
October day - October night 118
The lazy bees 119
No poems 120
This shining moment in the now 121
My old and well-known lover 122
A nameless ghost 123
All ye who are doubtful and confused 124
Carnal vision 125
A question 126
That rebellious streak always did him in 127
A cave on Judevine Mountain 128
Learning patience 129
The woodcutter changes his mind 130
What good is this? 131
It's now or never 132
Unnamed in the records of immortals 133
My house 134
Making a poem by quoting Issa 135
What we need 139
What have I got to complain about? 140
Different names, the same person 141
Winter : tonight : sunset 142
On the other side of anger 143
South China tiger, Green Mountain catamount 144
Tomorrow 145
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