Whiskey Tango Foxtrot

( 14 )

Overview

One of Time Magazine's Ten Best Books of 2014


Selected by NPR, Slate, and Kirkus as one of the Best Books of 2014


Shortlisted for the Pacific Northwest Book Award

Three young adults grapple with the...

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Overview

One of Time Magazine's Ten Best Books of 2014


Selected by NPR, Slate, and Kirkus as one of the Best Books of 2014


Shortlisted for the Pacific Northwest Book Award

Three young adults grapple with the usual thirty-something problems—boredom, authenticity, an omnipotent online oligarchy—in David Shafer's darkly comic debut novel.

The Committee, an international cabal of industrialists and media barons, is on the verge of privatizing all information. Dear Diary, an idealistic online Underground, stands in the way of that takeover, using radical politics, classic spycraft, and technology that makes Big Data look like dial-up. Into this secret battle stumbles an unlikely trio: Leila Majnoun, a disillusioned non-profit worker; Leo Crane, an unhinged trustafarian; and Mark Deveraux, a phony self-betterment guru who works for the Committee.

Leo and Mark were best friends in college, but early adulthood has set them on diverging paths. Growing increasingly disdainful of Mark's platitudes, Leo publishes a withering takedown of his ideas online. But the Committee is reading—and erasing—Leo's words. On the other side of the world, Leila's discoveries about the Committee's far-reaching ambitions threaten to ruin those who are closest to her.

In the spirit of William Gibson and Chuck Palahniuk,Whiskey Tango Foxtrot is both a suspenseful global thriller and an emotionally truthful novel about the struggle to change the world in- and outside your head.

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Editorial Reviews

The New York Times - Dwight Garner
…a paranoid, sarcastic and clattering pop thriller…there are trace elements of DeLillo, of Pynchon, of Philip K. Dick, of the Hari Kunzru of Transmission, of the Neal Stephenson of Cryptonomicon, those usual suspects from whom all would-be techno-dystopianists borrow…What puts this novel across isn't its lucid, post-Patriot Act thematics, however, as righteous as they are. Instead, it's that the storyteller in Mr. Shafer isn't at war with the thinker and the word man in him; he's got a sick wit and a high style. Reading his prose is like popping a variant of the red pill in The Matrix: Everything gets a little crisper…Mr. Shafer has written a bright, brash entertainment, one that errs, when it errs at all, on the side of generosity, narrative and otherwise. It tips you, geekily and humanely, through the looking glass.
Publishers Weekly
★ 06/16/2014
Journalist Shafer hits all the right buttons in his debut as he mixes crime fiction, espionage, and SF in a darkly comic novel about paranoia and big business. A battle for control over all the information in the world has begun. The Committee, an international organization comprising industry and media leaders, has plans to privatize the news, the publishing industry, and all other social media. Dear Diary, an online movement, has set itself up as a formidable enemy of the Committee, using politics, spy craft, and technology to thwart its initiatives. Caught up in this war are Leila Majnoun, a disaffected nonprofit worker; Leo Crane, an unorthodox kindergarten teacher who lives off a modest trust fund; and Mark Deveraux, a drug addict who inadvertently becomes a bogus self-help guru and appears to work for the Committee. At times convoluted but never slack, the plot thrives on a realistic approach while seamlessly switching between such locales as Myanmar, London, and Oregon. The Committee’s takeover of the Internet, its ability to change words as they are being typed, and its targeting of enemies’ family members evokes a chilling, Orwellian society. Agent: Gráinne Fox, Fletcher & Co. (Aug.)
Kirkus Reviews
2014-06-17
A droll, all-too-plausible contemporary thriller pulls a mismatched trio of stressed-out 30-somethings into underground guerilla warfare against a sinister conspiracy to own the information superhighway.On one side of the world, you have Leila Majnoun, an increasingly jaded operative for a global nonprofit agency struggling to do good deeds despite the brutal, stonewalling autocrats who run Myanmar (Burma). On another side is Mark Deveraux, a self-loathing self-improvement guru living a glamorous and debt-ridden lifestyle in the promised land of Brooklyn. Somewhere in the middle (Portland, Oregon, to be precise) is Mark’s old school chum Leo Crane, a misanthropic poor-little-rich-kid grown into a trouble-prone, substance-abusing and seedily paranoid adult. The destinies of these three lost souls are somehow yoked together by an international cabal of one-percenters who want to create something called “New Alexandria,” where all the information available (or even unavailable) online will be in their money-grubbing control, thereby making the recent real-life National Security Agency abuses of power seem like benign neglect. Shafer’s arch prose, comedic timing and deft feel for shadowy motives in high places are reminiscent of the late Richard Condon (The Manchurian Candidate), only with sweeter, deeper characterizations. At times, you wish he’d move things along a wee bit faster and make his menace more tangibly scary than it is here. But it’s also possible that Shafer is remaking the international thriller into something more humane and thus more credible than what fans of the genre are accustomed to.An edgy, darkly comedic debut novel whose characters and premise are as up-to-the-minute as an online news feed but as classic as the counterculture rebellions once evoked by Edward Abbey and Ken Kesey.
From the Publisher
"Is it too late to nominate a candidate for novel of the summer? . . . A paranoid, sarcastic and clattering pop thriller . . . Mr. Shafer gets the playfulness-to-paranoia ratio about exactly right. . . . He's got a sick wit and a high style. Reading his prose is like popping a variant of the red pill in The Matrix: Everything gets a little crisper. . . . Whiskey Tango Foxtrot is a page-turner, yet many more "literary" writers will, I suspect, envy Mr. Shafer's tactile prose. His eye is hawklike. . . . Mr. Shafer has written a bright, brash entertainment, one that errs, when it errs at all, on the side of generosity, narrative and otherwise. It tips you, geekily and humanely, through the looking glass."—Dwight Garner, New York Times

"Shafer's savvy, sardonic take on our social media- and Big Data-worshiping society is as current as your Twitter feed..Just in time for your August beach trip, put Whiskey on your Amazon Wish List. As if they don't already know you want it."—Patty Rhule, USA Today

"Genius techno-­thriller à la Neal ­Stephenson, powered by social-media info-conspiracy à la Dave Eggers."—Lev Grossman, Time

"No summary can do justice to the snap and smarts of this witty tale. . . . A clever book with an entertaining narrator just exploding with personalities."—Jenni Laidman, Chicago Tribune

"Zinging with wit and pop culture savvy . . . Shafer's writing is hip, wickedly hilarious, cutting edge, and ultimately concerned with old-fashioned notions of morality and redemption. . . His inventive, comic, dystopian semi-thriller restored my faith in fiction."—Mark Lindquist, Seattle Times

Library Journal
08/01/2014
While working in Burma, Leila stumbles upon a secret that leads a quasigovernmental agency to target her job, her family, and her freedom. She seeks the help of an underground network to help sort out the tangled mess but gets drawn deeper into a stranger world than she ever imagined. Leo, suffering the deepest manic-depressive bout of his life, has allowed his paranoia to run wild. Concerned for his well-being, Leo's sisters stage an intervention, but he quickly discovers that in his case, the paranoia might be well founded. Mark is baffled to find himself a famous self-help guru after his hastily written manifesto becomes an international best seller. Now the personal life coach to one of the most powerful men in the world, Mark soon learns that the seedy underbelly of conspiracy lies nearer than he thought. As their paths converge, Leila, Leo, and Mark join the Dear Diary network to combat "The Committee," and fight a secret coup seeking to privatize all information, worldwide. VERDICT Fast paced, fascinating, suspenseful, and paranoid, this is a darkly funny debut. Aptly named, the novel leads each of the characters, as well as the reader, even as they race ahead to the final climax, to wonder "wtf?" [See "Summer Best Debuts," First Novels, LJ 7/14, p. 32.—Ed.]—Jennifer Beach, Cumberland Cty. P.L., VA
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316252638
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
  • Publication date: 8/5/2014
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 49,109
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

David Shafer is a graduate of Harvard and the Columbia Journalism School. He has lived in Argentina and Dublin, and has been a journalist, sometimes a carpenter, once a taxi driver and briefly a flack for an NGO. He now lives in Portland with his wife, daughter, and son.

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Interviews & Essays

Barnes & Noble Q&A from David Shafer
David Shafer is the author of WHISKEY TANGO FOXTROT, which the NY Times said “may be the novel of the summer,” and which Lev Grossman called “astoundingly good.” David is a graduate of Harvard and the Columbia Journalism School. He has lived in Argentina and Dublin, and has been a journalist, a carpenter, a taxi driver, and briefly a flack for an NGO. He now lives in Portland with his wife, daughter, and son.

1. WHISKEY TANGO FOXTROT is about the danger of data—when it's in the hands of an omnipotent online oligarchy. Is Big Data really the new evil empire?
No. There are wondrous and progressive uses for thevast swathes information that can now be collected: data to do good epidemiology, data to figure out what we're going to do for our ruined planet.There's some information I don't mind giving up to the collective; there's a large portion of my life that I don't consider private. Data vacuuming — please forgive the tired metaphor — is only a tool,with no morality intrinsic to it. So if an evil cabal were doing it for nefarious pecuniarypurposes, we'd definitely be screwed. In the twentieth century we had all those madmen, the monstrous dictators. That's the threat we know, and I hope we're be less likely to fall for it again. But now the thing we need to watch out for is some sort of “technoligarchy,” a headless kind of beast that's watching us now, and learning about us. It's mainlyvast buildings full of servers, all being directed by algorithms. (Full disclosure: I know exactly zero about computer science. But it's lots of decisions being made mathematically, right?) There are probably still humans somewhere in the equation, though soon those might only be guys dusting the servers. I'm not that worried about the Singularity —the web coming alive somehow to rule over us — I'm worried about unconscious autonomous machines. Like the NSA's cyber warfare bot called MonsterMind(!). That was the recent dispatch from Snowden's purloined hard drives.
(I shouldn't have said “ruined planet.” I am more hopeful than that. Maybe “injured planet.”)

2. Considering the undeniable power of technology and today's large corporations, how close do you think we are to “an international cabal privatizing all information”?
With The Committee, I was stretching things for comic and dramatic effect. Sucha cabal would require that the techno-barons cooperate with each other; I don't think that's happening. And I don't think we're in imminent danger. It seems that all they want for now is data about our consumer habits so they can target their advertising more efficiently. If they start to want much morethan that, we should push back. Again, this of course all depends on the “They.” When I keep saying “they” I know I sound paranoid, but in factI believe that I live in a functioning democracy. We can decide to protect ourselves from the sort of evil oligarchy I made up for the book. We just need good journalists, an uncowed citizenry and good-hearted leaders. In WTF, The Committee is mainly banking on our laziness, our tendency to ignore creeping control if we are kept distracted by shiny things - moving sidewalks in airports, box sets of TV shows, organic kale in a sparkling produce section.
But there is this worrying trend, which is accelerating: we're pouringso much of our lives into our devices. The devices then send all that back to HQ. The device is called a “platform.” Your phone is a platform. Once we had desks, as there was paper on them.Then we haddesktops, and the paper became little pictures of paper, and now I don't think they're really bothering with the little pictures anymore. They want us to keep all our information with them, in a place they have asked us to call “the cloud.” The deal with cloud storage is essentially: Let us keep all your stuff. We'll do it for free and we'll make it searchable. But we'll give it back to you really fast when you ask for it. That seems like a raw deal.

3. So you do suffer from Internet paranoia?
No. Or if I do I am taking very few precautions. I have crummy passwords. I never back up. I leave my phone beside my bed at night. I do not read the EULAs that I agree to by clicking a box. I told my bank the name of my first pet. I use a debit card to buy a $2 coffee. Twenty times a day I type into a little box words that tell the story of what I'm thinking about. I grew up as this locomotive went from chugging to barreling, and I've never even taken the time to really understand how it works. Like Leila, I've never looked behind the icons. But I do the easy things. I tape over my web cam (If that's really where the lens is—don't you think there's something fishy about the little green light on the CAPS LOCK key?). I don't "tag" pictures of people on social networks, or "allow location services" on my Words With Friends. I think we should leave some work for the actual spies at Fort Meade. I also write letters — with a pen and an envelope and a stamp. I bet the NSA finds that tedious.

4. One of your protagonists, Leila, works for an NGO, which you yourself have done. Was Leila's experienced based on yours?
My NGO work experience was brief. After Hurricane Katrina savaged the Gulf Coast in 2005, I worked as a press officer for an NGO that was trying to help people who had been flooded out of their homes and communities. We did help. But I saw then what a difficult proposition it is — helping people — especially when an organization is trying to do it. I'd thought Aid and Relief work would consist of delivering vital goods and services to needy, grateful people. It turns out to be more complicated than that.
I wrote Leila to be a logistician because the people I met who had that job description seemed to get things done. They have a point A — point B job, and they are very no-nonsense. Leila is a hero not because she is going to be the savior of women's health in Myanmar, but because she works hard at her job, because she tries to roll the boulder forward. I think that the people who work in Aid and Development are helping a great deal. (They are also usually agreeing to give up the idea of being rich, which is saying something in this world.) Plus, I imagine they probably do run up against spies, which makes them excellent for my purposes.

5.The novel jumps around between a number of different international locations—Myanmar, London, Dublin, New York, California, and, of course, Portland, your current hometown. Why those cities? Are the locations and the geography in the book real?
Yes, I walked the streets of those places. The Portland and Dublin locations are especially reality-based; Portland has been home for half my life. Dublin and I had a thing. London and I had a fling. Myanmar I only traveled through. Tarzana, and LA in general, not so much. I made up a fair bit in those passages. But isn't that why they made Google Street View? If the LA scenes seem kind of pixelated or perspectivally-oblongated, that's the fault of the Google camera.

6. How much research went into the book?
To write Leila I had do a fair bit of looking stuff up. I didn't know anything about Iran, or Persian culture, I didn't know much about Myanmar. In terms of trying to sound convincing about grand scale data collection and how that might happen I leaned pretty hard on the work of two journalists named Dana Priest and William Arkin. They wrote a series for The Washington Post, and then a book called Top Secret America. As I mentioned above, I tried to make all the locations ring true, so there was a lot of walking around, driving around, looking at maps. But I'd say two-thirds of the book required no research. It required honest recall and imagination.

7. What inspired the title?
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot is radio code for WTF, which in turn is code for a three-word phrase that is most often considered an obscenity. But I meant this WTF to take in all the ways in which the phrase might be uttered, from its angry form to its merely frustrated form, to a form in which it is a nearly religiousexpression of wonder and bafflement about the world.

8. What are your own favorite books about nefarious oligarchies?
Infinite Jest, by David Foster Wallace. (I'm one of those people.)Maybe I could say the Robert Graves novels,I, Claudius and Claudius The King. They definitely treat an oligarchy. I don't know thatthe Romans in questionwere nefarious, but certainly they were bonkers. I would also say Bob Shacochis's grand novel, The Woman Who Lost Her Soul, though I fear that to do so might actually undersell the thing. Nefarious is too silly a word to describe the people who pull the strings in the world of Shacochis's book. I guess they're not even oligarchs. But they are wicked, powerful and hidden.

9. In the book, almost everyone in Dear Diary has a codename. Have you given thought to what yours would be?
Colonel Truth. But now that one's blown, so I'll need to choose another one.

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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2014

    As the NY Times put it, Whiskey Tango Foxtrot may well be the bo

    As the NY Times put it, Whiskey Tango Foxtrot may well be the book of the summer. I'll go further: Mr. Shafer's debut will win the Pulitzer. 

    For readers who want enthralling character development, rich subtlety of plot, nuanced convergence of detail and a brilliant finish, this book sets a new bar for the literary techno thriller. An immediate comparison is Thomas Pynchon's Bleeding Edge, but Shafer's work stands apart in many ways.

    First of all, if there's a single word to describe Shafer's style, that word is authenticity. 

    Some descriptions from the first half (no spoilers):

    "And what about for the first eight, ten years of his life, when loving parents encouraged his obsession with dragons and secret worlds and animals in vests who poured tea and drove motorcars and who gave him to read Tolkien and Susan Cooper and the Brothers Grimm and Madeline L'Engle and C.S. Lewis? Is a boy supposed to leave his imagination on the side of the road when he boards the bus to manhood?"

    "But now he was doing that thing he did when a waitress recited the specials -- he was trying too hard to pay attention, so he was paying attention to paying attention, not to what was going on."

    " '[Straw] has that basketball team, and he's always endowing business schools and that sort of malarkey.' "

    ". . . there was a zing in the air, the kind produced when subjugated staff members move swiftly through corridors."

    " 'Sure. Sure. The writer,' said Cole, as though *writer* were a funny antique job, like falconer."

    [Mark Deveraux's mother to him when he was a boy, on the subject of the Lincoln Memorial] " 'There's lots and lots of great people -- and women too, not just men -- who don't get statues, who live faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.' "

    [Of a hotel in a desolate suburb] "The lobby plants needed dusting."

    According to Vonnegut's rules for writing, every sentence should reveal the character or advance the action. Shafer's writing consistently does both at once. W T F is an elaborately comprehensible mystery box where plot keys are hidden in secret panels and the details presented on one surface connect like epiphanies to unlock puzzles in another layer. 

    Mr. Shafer's debut is justifiably drawing comparisons to Pynchon, Franzen, DeLillo, Philip K. Dick, and others. I'll add one more: Franz Kafka. In works like The Castle, Kafka creates a world in which everything has two meanings at once; contrary states such as waking and dreaming, acceptance and expulsion, citizenship and exile, lust and revulsion -- all can coexist. And just when the reader begins to make a choice as to which half of the duality to trust, *that* element then bifurcates into two more possibilities. In W T  F, this literary device takes shape in Mark Deveraux, loser and genius, peon and mogul, swayed by Good and courted by Evil.

    You won't regret falling through the gorgeous kaleidoscope of this exceptional book. And to fully enjoy it, you should unbuckle the seatbelt (*shred* the f'n seatbelt, you won't need it), trust the detail, read the comic genius lines out loud and most importantly: take the eye test. 

    It's all connected, and it's all there at the end.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 5, 2014

    It was my intention to ration this novel over a week after the d

    It was my intention to ration this novel over a week after the degree of NYT enthusiasm.  Be that as it may, I finished it by the 3rd evening.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 7, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Shows Strong Potential   I would like to thank NetGalley &

    Shows Strong Potential  

    I would like to thank NetGalley & Mulholland Books for granting me a copy of this e-ARC to read in exchange for an honest review. Though I received this e-book for free that in no way impacts my review.

    Goodreads Blurb:<blockquote><strong>William Gibson meets Chuck Palahniuk in an ambitious novel of international techno conspiracy and dark comedy.</strong>
    The Committee, an international cabal of techno-industrialists and media barons, is on the verge of privatizing all information. Dear Diary, an idealistic online Underground, stands in the way of that takeover, using radical politics, classic spycraft, and technology that makes Big Data look like dial-up. Into this pitched and secret battle tumbles an unlikely trio: Leila Majnoun, a disenchanted non-profiteer; Leo Crane, a bipolar trustafarian; and Mark Devreaux, a wracked and fraudulent self-betterment guru.
    David Shafer's WHISKEY TANGO FOXTROT is both a suspenseful global thriller and an emotionally realistic novel about the struggle to change the world in and outside of your head. In the spirit of Chuck Palahniuk, it is a remarkable debut that announces a captivating new voice in literary suspense.</blockquote>


    This book was a slow starter for me. A very slow starter. By the time I was 30% into the book I was ready to call it quits, but decided I'd give it just a bit more time as I hate to leave books unfinished once I've begun reading them. Thankfully things did get substantially better as I got deeper into the story, but it was an uphill battle.
    Though I didn't find the book to be great I could give it 'good,' and that's because the third quarter of the book did a miraculous job of turning things up, but it simply wasn't enough for me to feel that I'd enjoyed the book. It took too long for me to feel involved with the characters, or the characters with the plot. I felt that the author was trying a bit too hard to keep the plans of this international cabal under wraps, not just from the unsuspecting characters but also from the reader. And that was problematic for me. 
    Not being able to get a grasp on this terrible 'thing' being planned made it very challenging for me to remain invested. It didn't help that the three main characters are kept in their own chapters for quite some time, with limited, if any, interaction. Having to bounce between each character's individual story without a cohesive plot to hang things on just tired me out. Granted that changed, but for me it was too little, too late. But I do think that this author has potential, and fully expect to enjoy future works better. 
    The main characters were interesting, and Schafer did an excellent job of getting into their heads, and showing us what they were going through in their very different lives. The frustration of running up against red-tape and corrupt governments and organizations every day while trying to improve the lives of others; the fear and self-doubt of someone who has always had an elevated opinion of themselves but never had it reconcile with how they felt the world viewed them; and the depth of depression book-ending manic highs of such euphoria that you are willing to endure the lows just to touch the highs one more time. Each of these personalities has such authenticity that it almost makes me wonder just how much experience Shafer has had with these personality traits and personas.

    I must admit this book description is what caught my attention, citing two of my favorite authors and likening this new author's voice to their seminal works. I figured it must be quality if both these author's were mentioned, heck even if one had been mentioned I'd have tried the book! I just need to remember that reviews are subjective, and not to be swayed when reviewers draw correlations between a new author and a favorite established author(s). Frankly I saw less William Gibson in this than Neal Stephenson, but then that is just my own subjective opinion, and even then I'm referring to Stephenson's early works, before he really found his stride, but his potential still shone through. I anticipate that this will someday be Shafer's version of <em>The Big U</em>
    .

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2014

    Thought provoking

    This book is literature disguised as a thriller or the opposite. Thought provoking. Enjoy!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 7, 2014

    David Shafer is a new talent on the scene, folks. If you like cl

    David Shafer is a new talent on the scene, folks. If you like clever writing, likeable yet still realistic characters, and a ripping yarn - this is a book for you. One warning: you may, as I was, be initially put off by what may be considered an &quot;abrupt&quot; ending. For myself, I felt this way until I re-read the last few chapters and ultimately realized I was just disappointed that I was leaving some friends behind now that the book was ending. Read the last few chapters closely and you'll have most of what you need. It may not tie it up in a pretty bow, but who says literature has to do that anyway? Bottom line, this is a very good and enjoyable book - I recommend it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 10, 2014

    I read the book in h/c twice already. It's one of a kind. Salo

    I read the book in h/c twice already. It's one of a kind. Salon reviewer called it a thriller with a soul. It's kind of a picaresque suspense story. not a standard issue thriller. Funny incisive writing sometimes whimsy sometimes silly sometimes mordant but never mean. Since I don't know post-modernists, I see it in the tradition of Stevenson and Buchan but with wild imagination verging on sci-fi and much more comic element . A pleasure to read; a thriller that delights.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2015

    Holy cow I was so bored and got 1/4th of the way thru by mistake. God this was so oolong boring

    Boring and going nowhere

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2014

    &#12665

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2014

    Dont go to foxclan!

    Iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitttttttttssssssssss ssssstttttuuuuupppppiiiiiddddd!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2014

    ||MAP & RULES OF FOXCLAN||

    HOPEFULLY, WE CAN GO ON RAIDS EVERY WEEK. <p> ||Map|| <p> Res 1 - Map & Rules <br> Res 2 - Bios <br> Res 3 - Main Camp <br> Res 4 - Alpha's Den <br> Res 5 - Beta's Den <br> Res 6- &infin - Hunting Grounds & Territory <p> ||Rules|| <p> You must include your rank in your name. <br> No godmodding, powerplaying, or other forms of RPing like that. <br> Go out and catch some food! The pile can't restock itself! <br> If Alpha is gone for longer than a week, Beta takes charge. <br> ALL MUST START AS PUPS! <p> ||RANKS|| <p> ||Alpha||- Leader of FoxClan. Can pretty much do whatever they want. <p> ||Beta||- Deputy of FoxClan. Can not upgrade higher than Hunters, unless the Alpha is on an excused absence. <p> ||Killers|| <p> The esteemed warriors of FoxClan. Can only be 7 at a time. Can join and lead raids & hunting parties anytime. <p> ||Hunters|| <p> Warriors of FoxClan. Can have a mate and kits. Can lead raids & patrols when instructed. <p> ||Tails|| <p> Junior warriors of FoxClan. Can have a mate but no kits. Can join patrols & raids when instructed. Cannot lead them. <p> ||Pups|| <p> The kits of FoxClan. Cannot join patrols or leave camp. Cannot have a mate. When you are old enough, you may become a Tail. <p> Have Fun! <p> *||You MUST have a rogue name! Not a warrior name!||*

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  • Posted October 17, 2014

    good characters with real personalities, good story-never a dull

    good characters with real personalities, good story-never a dull moment

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2015

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 6, 2014

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