Whispers From God: A Life Beyond Imaginings

Overview

The glamorous Pat Montandon lived a seemingly perfect life, complete with multimillionaire husband Al Wilsey, loving son Sean, and a penthouse overlooking San Francisco Bay. She socialized with the elite, and was immortalized as a character in Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City. Then everything fell apart. Wilsey divorced her and Sean abandoned her, both opting instead for the affections of Montandon's once-close friend, Dede Traina.

Penniless and contemplating suicide, Pat ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (27) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $4.25   
  • Used (19) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$7.45
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(1844)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
0061373923 BRAND NEW. We are a tested and proven company with over 900,000 satisfied customers since 1997. We ship daily M-F. Choose expedited shipping (if available) for much ... faster delivery. Delivery confirmation on all US orders. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Nashua, NH

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$4.25
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(10810)

Condition: New
2008-04-01 New 0061373923 NEW! ! ! Publisher overstock. Tracking is not available for orders shipped outside of the United States. If you would like to track your domestic ... order please be sure to select the Priority/Expedited Shipping option. Read more Show Less

Ships from: McKeesport, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$6.05
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(798)

Condition: New
PAPERBACK New 0061373923 SERVING OUR CUSTOMERS WITH BEST PRICES. FROM A COMPANY YOU TRUST, HUGE SELECTION. RELIABLE CUSTOMER SERVICE! ! HASSLE FREE RETURN POLICY, SATISFACTION ... GURANTEED**** Read more Show Less

Ships from: Philadelphia, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$7.03
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(739)

Condition: New
PAPERBACK New 0061373923! ! ! ! BEST PRICES WITH A SERVICE YOU CAN RELY! ! !

Ships from: Philadelphia, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$7.03
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(988)

Condition: New
PAPERBACK New 0061373923 Friendly Return Policy. A+++ Customer Service!

Ships from: Philadelphia, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$7.07
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(455)

Condition: New
PAPERBACK New 0061373923! ! KNOWLEDGE IS POWER! ! ENJOY OUR BEST PRICES! ! ! Ships Fast. All standard orders delivered within 5 to 12 business days.

Ships from: Southampton, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$11.98
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(282)

Condition: New
0061373923 New item in stock, may show minimal wear from storage. I ship daily and provide tracking! 100% Money Back Guarantee!

Ships from: FORT MYERS, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$11.98
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(3)

Condition: New
PAPERBACK New 0061373923 New item in stock, may show minimal wear from storage. I ship daily and provide tracking! 100% Money Back Guarantee!

Ships from: LEHIGH ACRES, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Oh the Hell of It All

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$11.99
BN.com price

Overview

The glamorous Pat Montandon lived a seemingly perfect life, complete with multimillionaire husband Al Wilsey, loving son Sean, and a penthouse overlooking San Francisco Bay. She socialized with the elite, and was immortalized as a character in Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City. Then everything fell apart. Wilsey divorced her and Sean abandoned her, both opting instead for the affections of Montandon's once-close friend, Dede Traina.

Penniless and contemplating suicide, Pat needed to reinvent herself . . . again. Casting her old life aside, she became a humanitarian for peace, a voice speaking out for the world's helpless children. The preacher's daughter, celebrity, and socialite had a new mission: to spread a message of hope in times of crisis.

A sumptuous feast of a memoir, Whispers from God is the tale of a poor-girl-turned-rich-turned-poor-again who has found peace through her devotion to something far greater than wealth and fame.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
This woman has done it all: She's been called "the hostess with the mostest" and "the queen of the San Francisco jet set." She's been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize and been honored as a United Nations Peace Messenger. This daughter of two Texas ministers gained fame as a party giver and friend of avant-garde artists; hosted a popular TV talk show and survived a residence in a hexed San Francisco. And now in her enthralling tell-all, Oh The Hell Of It All, Pat Montandon unfurls the story of an almost unbelievable life.
Mikhail Gorbachev
“[Montandon’s] book will multiply the number of people ready to devote their lives to the service of high ideals.”
Sean Wilsey
“I can testify to my mother’s ability to tell a wild, fascinating, redemptive story, full of heart and joy.”
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061373923
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/1/2008
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 384
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.96 (d)

Meet the Author

Pat Montandon moved from Oklahoma to San Francisco in the 1960s, becoming a newspaper columnist, television host, and writer. She has been interviewed by the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, USA Today, People, and numerous other media outlets. She lives in Beverly Hills.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Oh the Hell of It All
A Memoir

Chapter One

Preacher's Daughter

Almost everything was considered a sin while I was growing up as a preacher's daughter in Texas and Oklahoma in the '30s: makeup, dying one's hair, funny papers on Sunday, movies, short-sleeved dresses, and jewelry. Tent revival meetings with sermonizers exhorting sinners to confess dotted the landscape, which stretched mile after mile across the flat plains of the Lone Star State and throughout the rolling hills of Oklahoma.

As a child my world was family, school, friends, and church. Church came first. It permeated my youth. As the seventh of eight children born to a West Texas fundamentalist minister father, I was constantly exhorted to be good. Goodness was enforced according to the rigid tenets of my parents' faith.

My strict father was often warm and kind, although he could fly off the handle, scaring us kids half to death. He loved all humanity, advocating equality between races at a time when it was dangerous to do so. His friendship with Negroes was the one point of contention between my father and mother. She would often tell him he would rue the day he allowed "Coloreds' to attend his services.

Mother was severe and unsympathetic, yet she loved music and played the piano, taught us poetry, and emphasized the importance of being able to read and speak in public. She could also be quite humorous, but that was rare.

One of my sisters, Betty Ruth, had died from a mastoid infection when she was two, shortly before I was born on December 26, 1928. The ghost of my dead sister haunted me. Knowing I could never replace her I would try to be moreaccomplished than my older siblings and then maybe, someday, my family would love me too, I thought. My six surviving siblings—three sisters and three brothers—were usually in Mama's good graces, because they never dared to disagree with her. But she and I were constantly at war. I wanted to listen to The Pepper Cadets, a kids' radio show, play dress-up using lipstick, and go to a Shirley Temple movie—all sinful things in my parents' view.

One Sunday morning when I was eight, I refused to go to church.

"I'm not going. I'm not!' I yanked off the pink ribbons just tied onto my pigtails and threw them on the floor. Mother's sharp slap was like a gunshot. My face stung, but I would not allow myself to cry.

"No eight-year-old girl will tell me what she's going to do, and not going to do.' Collecting her Bible, Mama commanded me to follow her and my cooperative older siblings to the church house. In her shapeless print dress (pink roses against a blue background), face, eyebrows, and lashes covered with Rachel Number One, a face powder deemed okay by God, I thought Mama looked like an albino.

"I hate her,' I dared whisper to that secret inner self where all my real thoughts went.

Our battle raged almost every Sunday. I rebelled at going to church and hearing about the Mark of the Beast, Seven-Headed Monsters, The End of the World, and all those folks burning in hell, because God, a man with a beard sitting on a throne in the sky, said they were sinners. God scared me. Of course I always had to go, no matter how mightily I professed to having a stomachache, or even once when I pretended to have broken my leg.

One Sunday before we trooped off to church, Daddy sat us down and told us that he had invited his "Colored' friends to the service that day and that we were to be kind and welcoming to them. Mama had frowned and said under her breath that Daddy would be sorry.

At church I tuned out the preaching so I wouldn't have to think about the screams of sinners being burned in hell. I thought instead about the fried chicken dinner we would enjoy later, and our beautiful white Victorian parsonage, which had a flourishing flower garden and indoor plumbing. It was the most beautiful house I had ever seen, much less lived in.

"Hallelujah! Glory to God!' someone shouted. The sermon over, everyone rose for the final hymn and altar call. "Please turn your songbooks to page forty-five,' Daddy said. "As we sing the last song, remember this may be your final hour on earth. You had better think about that, Brothers and Sisters. You had better march up here and give your hearts and souls to God. This could be your last opportunity to make things right with your Maker.' As the fervor of his emotional pitch for heaven became more intense, Daddy's voice became thunderous, only to stop and then resume, as quiet as a whisper.

"Mother, while you play,' he said, indicating the black upright piano, "and the choir sings, I want those of you who are burdened with sin to come forward.' Mama took her place at the keyboard. She banged away as the men and women of the choir, wearing the mournful expression of career saints, sang.

"Softly and tenderly, Jesus is calling,

Calling for you and for me . . .

Come Home, Come Home. O-o-o-h sinner,

Come H-O-O-O-me.'

What if I died today, I thought, as I often did: Would I be saved? No—I would go straight to hell for sure. Remembering my past sins . . . how I lied about breaking Daddy's watch and how I stole a penny from the church collection plate once—I wailed "O-o-o-h . . .' as tears began to slide down my face, "I don't want to die a sinner.'

At the first O-o-o-h, several of the devout, sitting nearby, enveloped me as if they had found a genuine diamond on a kid's treasure hunt. They propelled me to the mourners' bench, where I fell on my knees, sobbing. "Here's little Patsy Lou, Lord Jesus, a sinner,' intoned the supplicants. "Only you know what dark deeds she's done, what evil thoughts she's had. Oh dear God, we pray for her deliverance.' In the background, I could hear shouting, "Amen, Glory to God, I've got religion!'

Oh the Hell of It All
A Memoir
. Copyright © by Pat Montandon. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Prologue     IX
Trouble in Paradise
Preacher's Daughter     3
Tea for Two     17
You've Gotta Have Heart     25
Ole Blue Eyes     34
The King of Torts     46
Unanswered Prayers     54
Dangerous Liaisons     71
Illusions of Love     80
The Vision     88
It Can Be Done     102
Doing God's Work     112
Stumbling Toward Redemption
The Evil Empire     127
And a Little Child Shall Lead Them     140
Selling Out     153
Please Don't Shoot My Mother     166
See A Teepee     175
The Declaration of Dependence     190
A Trip in the Dark     200
The Mystical Rock     211
The Hundredth Monkey     222
Testosterone Drums     229
Forgiveness
Forgiveness     239
The Enchanted Cottage     250
Hope for the Hopeless     259
Humpty Dumpty     269
The Last Trip to Moscow     282
Old Wounds     304
Embracing the Vision     313
Letting Go     323
Till Death Do Us Part     329
Oh the Miracle of It All     337
Epilogue     349
Acknowledgments     351

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Whispers from God
A Life Beyond Imaginings

Chapter One

Preacher's Daughter

Almost everything was considered a sin while I was growing up as a preacher's daughter in Texas and Oklahoma in the '30s: makeup, dying one's hair, funny papers on Sunday, movies, short-sleeved dresses, and jewelry. Tent revival meetings with sermonizers exhorting sinners to confess dotted the landscape, which stretched mile after mile across the flat plains of the Lone Star State and throughout the rolling hills of Oklahoma.

As a child my world was family, school, friends, and church. Church came first. It permeated my youth. As the seventh of eight children born to a West Texas fundamentalist minister father, I was constantly exhorted to be good. Goodness was enforced according to the rigid tenets of my parents' faith.

My strict father was often warm and kind, although he could fly off the handle, scaring us kids half to death. He loved all humanity, advocating equality between races at a time when it was dangerous to do so. His friendship with Negroes was the one point of contention between my father and mother. She would often tell him he would rue the day he allowed "Coloreds" to attend his services.

Mother was severe and unsympathetic, yet she loved music and played the piano, taught us poetry, and emphasized the importance of being able to read and speak in public. She could also be quite humorous, but that was rare.

One of my sisters, Betty Ruth, had died from a mastoid infection when she was two, shortly before I was born on December 26, 1928. The ghost of my dead sister haunted me. Knowing I could never replace her Iwould try to be more accomplished than my older siblings and then maybe, someday, my family would love me too, I thought. My six surviving siblings—three sisters and three brothers—were usually in Mama's good graces, because they never dared to disagree with her. But she and I were constantly at war. I wanted to listen to The Pepper Cadets, a kids' radio show, play dress-up using lipstick, and go to a Shirley Temple movie—all sinful things in my parents' view.

One Sunday morning when I was eight, I refused to go to church.

"I'm not going. I'm not!" I yanked off the pink ribbons just tied onto my pigtails and threw them on the floor. Mother's sharp slap was like a gunshot. My face stung, but I would not allow myself to cry.

"No eight-year-old girl will tell me what she's going to do, and not going to do." Collecting her Bible, Mama commanded me to follow her and my cooperative older siblings to the church house. In her shapeless print dress (pink roses against a blue background), face, eyebrows, and lashes covered with Rachel Number One, a face powder deemed okay by God, I thought Mama looked like an albino.

"I hate her," I dared whisper to that secret inner self where all my real thoughts went.

Our battle raged almost every Sunday. I rebelled at going to church and hearing about the Mark of the Beast, Seven-Headed Monsters, The End of the World, and all those folks burning in hell, because God, a man with a beard sitting on a throne in the sky, said they were sinners. God scared me. Of course I always had to go, no matter how mightily I professed to having a stomachache, or even once when I pretended to have broken my leg.

One Sunday before we trooped off to church, Daddy sat us down and told us that he had invited his "Colored" friends to the service that day and that we were to be kind and welcoming to them. Mama had frowned and said under her breath that Daddy would be sorry.

At church I tuned out the preaching so I wouldn't have to think about the screams of sinners being burned in hell. I thought instead about the fried chicken dinner we would enjoy later, and our beautiful white Victorian parsonage, which had a flourishing flower garden and indoor plumbing. It was the most beautiful house I had ever seen, much less lived in.

"Hallelujah! Glory to God!" someone shouted. The sermon over, everyone rose for the final hymn and altar call. "Please turn your songbooks to page forty-five," Daddy said. "As we sing the last song, remember this may be your final hour on earth. You had better think about that, Brothers and Sisters. You had better march up here and give your hearts and souls to God. This could be your last opportunity to make things right with your Maker." As the fervor of his emotional pitch for heaven became more intense, Daddy's voice became thunderous, only to stop and then resume, as quiet as a whisper.

"Mother, while you play," he said, indicating the black upright piano, "and the choir sings, I want those of you who are burdened with sin to come forward." Mama took her place at the keyboard. She banged away as the men and women of the choir, wearing the mournful expression of career saints, sang.

"Softly and tenderly, Jesus is calling,
Calling for you and for me . . .
Come Home, Come Home. O-o-o-h sinner,
Come H-O-O-O-me."

What if I died today, I thought, as I often did: Would I be saved? No—I would go straight to hell for sure. Remembering my past sins . . . how I lied about breaking Daddy's watch and how I stole a penny from the church collection plate once—I wailed "O-o-o-h . . ." as tears began to slide down my face, "I don't want to die a sinner."

At the first O-o-o-h, several of the devout, sitting nearby, enveloped me as if they had found a genuine diamond on a kid's treasure hunt. They propelled me to the mourners' bench, where I fell on my knees, sobbing. "Here's little Patsy Lou, Lord Jesus, a sinner," intoned the supplicants. "Only you know what dark deeds she's done, what evil thoughts she's had. Oh dear God, we pray for her deliverance." In the background, I could hear shouting, "Amen, Glory to God, I've got religion!"

Whispers from God
A Life Beyond Imaginings
. Copyright © by Pat Montandon. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)