Whistling Dixie

Whistling Dixie

by Marcia Vaughan, Barry Moser
     
 

"Mercy me, Dixie Lee, we've got no place to keep a creature like that!" declares Mama each time Dixie Lee comes whistling home with another preposterous pet from Hokey Pokey Swamp. But Dixie knows better. She finds the perfect place to keep a little bitty gator, a slithery snake, and a hoot owl. All goes well until Grandpappy comes home and orders those critters

See more details below

Overview

"Mercy me, Dixie Lee, we've got no place to keep a creature like that!" declares Mama each time Dixie Lee comes whistling home with another preposterous pet from Hokey Pokey Swamp. But Dixie knows better. She finds the perfect place to keep a little bitty gator, a slithery snake, and a hoot owl. All goes well until Grandpappy comes home and orders those critters back to the swamp come sunup. But late that very night, when the moon is up and the bogeyman stalks, maybe Dixie Lee's critters will turn out to make a fine pack of pets after all.

Marcia Vaughan has crafted a rollicking good read-aloud story with a southern flair. And Barry Moser's splendid watercolor paintings bring the Hokey Pokey Swamp and all its inhabitants to life with a wonderfully comic hand.

Author Biography:

Marcia Vaughan grew up in Tacoma, Washington, and studied children's theater, education, and library science at Central Washington State University. She began writing childrens books after moving to Australia in 1981. There she wroteWombat StewandThe Sea-Breeze Hotel. Marcia Vaughan, her husband, Richard, their son, Sam, and their big yellow dog, Indy, live on Vashon Island, Washington.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
In this tale of preposterous pets, a promising story line is dampened by ill-suited artwork. When Dixie Lee brings home a series of not-so-homeless and unlikely pets-including a "little bitty gator,'' a "slithery snake'' and an owl "stuck'' in a tree-Mama grudgingly lets her keep the critters, persuaded by the girl's dubious arguments (the owl, for example, will "keep the mist sisters from floating down [the chimney] and leaving a parcel of bad luck behind''). Dixie Lee's arguments are, of course, ultimately vindicated. Vaughan's (Wombat Stew; The Sea-Breeze Hotel) rustic humor and attempts at evoking a backwoods atmosphere lose their force as the cycle of events is repeated with each new animal discovery. Moser's portrait-like illustrations are characteristically handsome but static, seeming to freeze the action rather than advance it. Even in their depiction of a marauding bogeyman, these pictures display a formality at odds with the text's shenanigans.
Children's Literature - Judith Gravitz
"Cross my heart and hope to sit on a splinter." The spirited Dixie Lee amusingly shares with us the superstitions and promises of childhood. Roaming around the farm, Dixie Lee meets creatures that she just must keep. As her menagerie grows, her mother says, "I don't know what your grandpappy's going to say." But Dixie Lee perseveres and responds with a legitimate reason for keeping each, including a slimy snake-it will keep the bogeyman away. Each creature will protect the family from the haunting spirits of the night. Her mother agrees after Dixie Lee promises this will be the last...until she finds the next creature... so continues the rhythm of the story. And "as the moon was sailing high in the blue-black sky" the evil creatures of the night descend upon Dixie Lee and her family, but she is well armed. Moser's watercolors spectacularly highlight each episode and are printed on yellow-tinted paper with images of swamp trees embossed upon them. A treasure of a story.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060210298
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/01/1995
Edition description:
1st. ed
Pages:
32
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >