White Devils

White Devils

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by Paul McAuley
     
 

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One of the most exciting new science fiction writers of the new millennium, Paul McAuley has already won the Arthur C. Clarke Award, the Philip K. Dick Award, and the John W. Campbell Award. Now he presents a disturbingly convincing exploration of the future of Africa, the darker applications of biotechnology, and of the very nature of the human psyche.
The

Overview

One of the most exciting new science fiction writers of the new millennium, Paul McAuley has already won the Arthur C. Clarke Award, the Philip K. Dick Award, and the John W. Campbell Award. Now he presents a disturbingly convincing exploration of the future of Africa, the darker applications of biotechnology, and of the very nature of the human psyche.
The Congo, roughly thirty years from now. Plague, civil war, and rampant genetic engineering have spawned widespread chaos and devastation throughout Africa. Nicholas Hyde is investigating a reported massacre in a remote corner of the Congo when his team is attacked by a band of fierce apelike creatures, possibly the result of illegal genetic experimentation on chimpanzees. Nick survives the encounter, only to discover himself at the center of a massive cover-up.
Obligate, the supposedly eco-friendly transnational that now controls the Congo, denies the existence of the "white devils," and will stop at nothing to suppress all evidence to the contrary. Although Nick has secrets of his own to conceal, he becomes determined to uncover the origin of the mysterious creatures---and why certain individuals will kill to bury the truth.
But even the atrocities he has already witnessed cannot prepare him for the terrifying secret of the white devils.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781466845855
Publisher:
Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date:
05/28/2013
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
464
Sales rank:
544,530
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Paul McAuley was born in England on St George's Day 1955. He has worked as a research biologist in various universities, including Oxford and UCLA, and for six years was a lecturer in botany at St Andrews University. The first short story he ever finished was accepted by the American magazine Worlds of If, but the magazine folded before publishing it and he took this as a hint to concentrate on an academic career instead. He started writing again during a period as a resident alien in Los Angeles, and is now a full time writer.

His first novel, Four Hundred Billion Stars, won the Philip K. Dick Memorial Award, and fifth, Fairyland, won the 1995 Arthur C. Clarke and John W. Campbell Awards. His other novels include Of the Fall, Eternal Light, Red Dust, Pasquale's Angel, the three books of Confluence, Child of the River, Ancients of Days, and Shrine of Stars, The Secret of Life, Whole Wide World, and White Devils. He has also published three collections of short stories: The King of the Hill, The Invisible Country and Little Machines. A Doctor Who novella, the Eye of the Tyger, was published by Telos Books in 2003, forty years after the author was scared behind the couch by the Daleks. He lives in North London.


Paul McAuley was born in England on St George's Day 1955. He has worked as a research biologist in various universities, including Oxford and UCLA, and for six years was a lecturer in botany at St Andrews University. The first short story he ever finished was accepted by the American magazine Worlds of If, but the magazine folded before publishing it and he took this as a hint to concentrate on an academic career instead. He started writing again during a period as a resident alien in Los Angeles, and is now a full time writer. His first novel, Four Hundred Billion Stars, won the Philip K. Dick Memorial Award, and fifth, Fairyland, won the 1995 Arthur C. Clarke and John W. Campbell Awards. His other novels include Of the Fall, Eternal Light, Red Dust, Pasquale's Angel, the three books of Confluence, Child of the River, Ancients of Days, and Shrine of Stars, The Secret of Life, Whole Wide World, and White Devils. He has also published the collections of short stories The King of the Hill, The Invisible Country and Little Machines. A Doctor Who novella, The Eye of the Tyger, was published by Telos Books in November 2003, forty years after the author was scared behind the couch by the Daleks. He lives in North London.

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White Devils 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The most interesting part of the book for me was the extrapolation of genetic engineering theory into the near future and the dark ramifications that this could lead to by an author who really knows this stuff. Unfortunately, the book takes a big detour becoming an action/adventure yarn with a huge bodycount, melodramatic villains, and characters who refuse to shake hands! My suspension of disbelief failed when a Rambo-like Christian warrior motivated only by some seemingly random out-of-context verse in the Bible appears to pretty much create an excuse for tons of explosions, bodies, and convenient means to end the reign of the various villains. There are great ideas in here like gengineered butterflies with Pepsi logos that have prevailed over the indigenous African species. The world is half-way developed with a scientology-like religion that requires a partial lobotomy to join, but there doesn't appear to be much point to a lot of this. Again, I enjoyed the world McAuley created and the many ideas he devolops in this cautionary story of gengineering gone crazy. I just didn't care for the extreme violence and throw-away characters wrapped around it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
WOW: I would like to read more like this. A great story from a good author. This is the first book I have read by this author but it won't be the last.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The genetic engineering experiments have desolated Africa as outsider research biologists have used the continent as a giant laboratory. Not caring about the consequences to the African people, the experimenters created dangerous extinct animals like the saber-toothed tiger and various other outputs ranging from the benign corporate logo butterflies to the pandemic diseases. Especially brutal has become the no man¿s land Dead Zone, where trees have melted into wooden pools. The environmental group that rules over areas like the Congo, the Obligate, sends former mercenary Nick Hyde to lead an investigation into a recent massacre. Nick and his team find ripped asunder corpses with remains of brains that appear devoured. Appalled by the gruesome sight, Nick and his squad come under attack by lightning quick ferocious apelike creatures that use guns. The team is slaughtered with Nick escaping. Back in civilization, no one believes Nick¿s tale of demon killers except journalist Harmony Boniface. As they plan to return to the site of the carnage, they begin to unravel a major cover-up of a failed effort to re-erect Australopithecus, but that knowledge is lethal to anyone outside the conspiracy.

This heart of Africa tale depicts a dark future if certain genetic reengineering paths are followed. The story line is a cautionary tale of a Dr. Frankenstein variety using state of the art genome knowledge as a base for science unchecked turning the continent into hell. The plot is frightening as the depth of details makes the case for concern that recklessness can lead to devastation unheard of even in biblical proportions. However, the intensity is so realistic; it also slows down the plot as readers frightfully envision a near futuristic bleak landscape.

Harriet Klausner