The White Guy: A Field Guide [NOOK Book]

Overview


Let's face it: Everyone’s a little bit racist. So why not talk about it the only way we can, this side of warfare — via humor? In The White Guy, Stephen Hunt tries to come to grips with his whiteness in order to continue to rule the world, amass the bulk of its wealth, and generally dominate things as his people have done for the past 2,000 years, give or take a few odd moments like the rise of Attila the Hun, the rule of the 7th-century Caliphate, or the '70s. Then again, if you’re not a white guy, this is the ...
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The White Guy: A Field Guide

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Overview


Let's face it: Everyone’s a little bit racist. So why not talk about it the only way we can, this side of warfare — via humor? In The White Guy, Stephen Hunt tries to come to grips with his whiteness in order to continue to rule the world, amass the bulk of its wealth, and generally dominate things as his people have done for the past 2,000 years, give or take a few odd moments like the rise of Attila the Hun, the rule of the 7th-century Caliphate, or the '70s. Then again, if you’re not a white guy, this is the ultimate insider's guide to the minds of the men responsible for everything that's wrong with the world or your life: apartheid, colonialism, ethnic cleansing, the glass ceiling, patriarchy, serial killing, NASCAR, K-tel® Records, even the theft of rock ‘n’ roll. The White Guy humorously turns racial politics on its head, while delivering a subtle message about tolerance.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781926706955
  • Publisher: D & M Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/6/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 1,262,668
  • File size: 742 KB

Meet the Author


Stephen Hunt has covered arts and entertainment for Sports Illustrated, The Los Angeles Times, The New York Press, Saturday Night as well National Public Radio, Britain's FQ, Chile's El Mercurio Wiken and Italian Rolling Stone. He has had a number of plays produced Off Broadway, including The White Guy, purchased for television by Warner Brothers and Quincy Jones in 1999.
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Read an Excerpt


(Excerpt from the Introduction White Guys: A Closer Look)

Anyone who ever watched a National Geographic special on Africa knows that each tribe is different. Some tribes feature guys who are tall; some feature guys who are short (but lethal with a blow dart). Some tribes speak entirely in clicks. Others spend their days wandering the desert in search of food, shade and Coca-Cola bottles falling from the sky. (footnote: This from The Gods Must Be Crazy, which was an Australian movie, not a National Geographic special; but why quibble when we’re talking about a place with no oil whatsoever?)

White guys are a loose collection of tribes featuring their own unique rituals, cuisine, habitat, political systems and modes of dress. (footnote: The Professional Golfers’ Association (pga), grunge musicians and goths are but three examples. And Santa Monica mailmen, who deliver in khaki shorts.) Some white guys are tall (highly electable); some are tiny (but good listeners). Some wander the desert in search of a miracle (also known as Middle Eastern emocracy) and speak in incomplete sentences (see the collected speeches of the president of the United States). Others set up shop on the outskirts of villages (the suburbs), erecting temples to the family and filling them with plasma televisions, sports equipment and automobiles, then installing elaborate home protection devices that go off at inappropriate moments and annoy the hell out of the neighbours.

White guys have always been meticulous about record keeping, and you know what they say about who gets to write history: what oral tradition? We’ve got it in writing, pal.

Since white guys have written quite a bit of human history, we tended to come off pretty well, at least until the mid-’60s or so. Thanks to all those Vietnam draft dodgers who ended up getting faculty positions in Canada, the last forty years have been filled with dissenting voices, or, barring that, some highly dubious clothing combinations, a lot of sensible shoes and skyrocketing sales for acoustic-guitar-playing singer-songwriters. What seems to be missing from the discourse, however, is a comprehensive, objective, academic, thoroughly researched study of the various tribes of white guys and our rituals, beliefs and (property) values.

There won’t be one when you reach the end of this book, either, but it will have to do. Come on, I mean, do you really want statistics that prove shit? Know who invented statistics? A white guy with a sailing ship, in about the sixteenth century, trying to talk someone with money into financing his next road trip across the ocean. You can get statistics to prove anything.

Living, as we do, in a high-strung, conflict-strewn planet filled with “evil villains” who seek to harm truth tellers and believers in justice and democracy, it just seems to be a good moment to do a quick fact check on this perspective on the world. After all, when you live at a time of religious war, nuclear proliferation and climate change, getting it wrong could be the final mistake you get to make.

Question: Who dropped not one but two nukes, killing several hundred thousand non-white guys? Who launched one of the most enduring religious crusades of all time? Who has done way, way more than their share of eroding the ozone layer?



Answer: Are you warming to my theme yet?



(Excerpt from White Guys around the World)
Bay Area White Guy

Bay Area White Guy is against L.A., which goes without saying, and still gets a tingle every time the Giants beat the Dodgers, even though he is against baseball, because sport is the opiate of the masses. Bay Area White Guy is against celebrity, and wishes there were rules against those horrible people even existing. He is against tech in general and believes the world would be better of if we all just got to know our community better, although he does love the email and the blog. He is dead set against the pharmaceutical industry, who he considers just this side of war criminals, although he did get quite a life from going on Paxil for six months after the second wife left with the contractor who fixed up the Haight-Ashbury place.

Okay, he’s even against people like him, but that’s the one thing that makes him different from everyone else in this chapter: irony.

Bay Area White Guy got rich being against shit.

Is it a great country or what?

Of course, now that he has hit his prime years and become a member of the economic, social and political mainstream, Bay Area White Guy is more against shit than ever. Being against shit made him rich; why can’t kids today see that being against shit is the best way to get anywhere in this stinking, corrupt, materialistic, celebrity-driven culture? You want someone to notice the brand you’re pushing, even if that brand is you?
Be against it!

These are a return to the glory days of a sort for Bay Area White Guy. What with the kids off to their media industry internships, the wife on her national yoga tour that grosses more than most bands could ever dream about, and the bank account full, Bay Area White Guy has taken to blogging his thoughts about all the things he’s against.

And what do you know?

Millions of people across the country are just as against shit as he is.

(Excerpt from Optional Ending: For People Who Don't Have Time To Read the Whole Book)

We realize that books require a commitment of time and mental energy that many people choose not to make these days, what with Facebook, iPhones, saving the environment, House, The Office, Guitar Hero and whatnot.

Rather than explaining all the reasons why you really ought to read books, we have gone the next best: here, in a few pithy bullet points, is everything I’ve said in the previous couple hundred pages, boiled down to a few bright and breezy concluding thoughts.

You Know You’re a White Guy If . . .

Customs actually believes you thought it was cloves, and tells you to have a nice stay in their country.

Crossing things off your list is your most satisfying act of the day, next to checking your Blackberry and fantasizing about cashing in frequent-flier miles.

You’ve ever dreamed of being a pro bull rider.

You know all the words to more than three Bruce Springsteen songs. How can you not? “Had a wife and kids in Baltimore, Jack / I went out for a ride…”

You used to be into death metal, but prefer alt country these days.

Arcade Fire totally rules.

Your deep, dark secret is that you don’t really have one.

You don’t see race everywhere you look. Can’t we move on?

What’s really wrong with the country is all this political correctness.

You secretly really enjoyed Mamma Mia! The ’70s were actually kind of fun.

You think Halle Berry is hot. Okay, this makes you a guy.

(incomplete list)

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Table of Contents


Prologue
Introduction

Clothes, or Plumage
Cuisine of the White Male
Mood-Altering Substances
Habitat, or Home and Hearth
Spiritual Beliefs, or The Things That Matter Most
Emotional Life
Mating Habits

Interlude A - The Quest for Authenticity

White Guy Culture
Sports

Interlude B - The Pursuit of Excellence vs. The New Mediocrity

The White Guy in Human History
Political Systems, or Notes on Our Three-Thousand-Year Winning Streak
White Guys aorund the World
Twenty-First-Century White Guy
Optional Ending, for People Who Don't Have Time to Read the Whole Book
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