The White Horse Trick [NOOK Book]

Overview



The world is drowning.





Freak storms and devastating hurricanes sweep across the countryside. No one has enough food or firewood—electricity is an option only ...

See more details below
The White Horse Trick

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price

Overview



The world is drowning.





Freak storms and devastating hurricanes sweep across the countryside. No one has enough food or firewood—electricity is an option only for the tyrannical Commander—and then the Commander begins stealing young children away. Pup's little brother is one of the missing.




Determined to save his brother, Pup confronts the Commander and finds himself “volunteered” for a special force. One that will slip through the barriers
of time into a land where the sun never sets . . . just as another boy from Kinvara did long ago. With the future of both realms at stake, the fairies and humans must take drastic measures to stop the destruction. But not everyone wants the human race to survive. . . .




The thrilling conclusion to the story that began in the acclaimed The New Policeman.


Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This concluding volume in a trilogy that began with Thompson's beguiling The New Policeman blends Irish mythology with a compelling if slightly message-heavy story about global warming. Readers of the previous books are the best audience, as Thompson provides little summary. It's decades in the future and the Liddy kids are now senior citizens, except for Jenny, a changeling, who returned to her fairy homeland in The Last of the High Kings. Devastating storms have wrecked Earth and the economy; Jenny's older brothers, Aidan and Donal, survive but are at odds. Aidan has hoarded supplies and commands an army; Donal is his general but has a hidden agenda. As Aidan's stores run low, he hatches a plan to steal from the fairies. The action alternates between T'ír na n'Óg, where the sun always shines and no one is hungry, and the ravaged earth. Thompson considers many modern ills--the immigration issue is raised when the fairy king objects to streams of "ploddies" seeking refuge. But weighty concerns are balanced by humor, and the story ends on a hopeful note about the planet's ultimate resilience. Ages 12–up. (Sept.)
Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA) (Starred Review)
“A perfectly enchanting fantasy tale . . . mesmerizing and captivating.”
Horn Book (starred review)
“Thompson’s sparkling wit, droll humor, and nimble plotting are on full display…[she] has simply outdone herself.”
ALA Booklist
“Offers readers a taste of genre-blending that is both challenging and successful.”
Horn Book
"Thompson’s sparkling wit, droll humor, and nimble plotting are on full display…[she] has simply outdone herself."
Children's Literature - Kathie M. Josephs
This is the last book in the trilogy that began with The New Policeman. The story grips the reader right from the start: "They came in the dead of night when the family was sleeping...the first thing the family heard were the crash of the front door breaking down and the yelling of dangerous men, as they burst in." The setting is Ireland during the end of the twenty-first century. Everyone is poor with little food and clothing. The storms and hurricanes make it impossible to grow food. The Commander, who is absolutely evil, decides to take young children and have them fight in the army or work on the terraces. Pup's brother is one of the missing. Pup decides to try to stop the Commander but, of course, looses so he is also taken to be put in the army. Both fairies and humans must develop unusual strategies to win the "war." Both strongly believe in their fight and it becomes clear that someone does not want the humans to survive. This is a well-written book and even though it has 405 pages, the reading goes quickly; there is excitement on all pages. I do recommend this book; however, I believe the reader would benefit from reading the trilogy in sequence. Reviewer: Kathie M. Josephs
School Library Journal
Gr 7–10—Although magical T'ír na n'Óg remains unchanged, readers will find Ireland an unfamiliar place in this conclusion to the trilogy that began with The New Policeman (2007). In the not-too-distant future, global warming has wreaked havoc on the world's climate. Periods of unrelenting rain that have washed topsoil away and left crops rotting in the ground are followed by months of drought. People are starving, and there appears to be no hope. Aidan Liddy, whom readers last saw as a fractious toddler in The Last of the High Kings (2008, both HarperCollins), is now Commander Liddy. He has stockpiled food, tobacco, and other supplies, and uses his soldiers to control the suffering people. In an unexpected twist, Aidan's sensitive brother, Donal, now 69 years old, is his general. Although it appears that Donal has chosen an immoral path by following his brother, it becomes apparent that he has a plan to save the people and culture of Ireland, and fairyland will play an important role—if the Dagda and Aengus Óg will allow it. Thompson has done a marvelous job of spinning an entertaining and ultimately hopeful tale, while at the same time criticizing the devastation caused by humanity's excesses. And no book in this series would be complete without some music, so instead of a whimper, the end of this world comes with a wink and a nod, and an Irish tune—Heather M. Campbell, formerly at Philip S. Miller Library, Castle Rock, CO
Kirkus Reviews
Starting at the ending and ending at the beginning, Thompson's latest Liddy-family romp in Tír na n'Óg (The Last of the High Kings, 2008, etc.) lives up to the highest expectations and brings back familiar friends from both worlds, from Aengus, the Dagda and the puka to Jenny, J.J. and Mikey. The tale begins in a dystopian future, when climate change has wreaked havoc. The raging weather has fundamentally changed society, and communities exist as virtual islands in medieval conditions. Donal Liddy thinks he has a solution, but power players in both worlds are more intent on satisfying personal goals than looking after the good of all. Jenny and J.J. grasp onto the "white horse trick" as a possible creative solution to their difficulties. The humor in the telling, the high stakes and the absolute adherence to the rules of the world previously revealed keeps the suspense level in the stratosphere. As one character after another acts with complete, independent consistency, never bending to the demands of the plot, the author's prowess is increasingly evident. Fast-paced, masterful and wholly satisfying. (Fantasy. 12 & up)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062021014
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 8/24/2010
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 1,256,273
  • Age range: 13 - 17 Years
  • File size: 569 KB

Meet the Author

Kate Thompson lives on the west coast of Ireland, which provides inspiration for the Irish magic, music, and landscape in the award-winning The New Policeman and The Last of the High Kings.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 16, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    recommended

    The white horse trick
    By: Kate Thompson
    Joshua lee

    In Ireland the world has been destroyed by climate changes and Ireland is drowning with too much rain. Commander Aiden Liddy, is now part of an governing army that has piled up food and is in charge of distributing and controlling the population. His general, Donal, has a different plan that might destroy both worlds of humans and fairy's as they know it. With Tir'na'nOg unchanged, the king of the fairies has had a bunch of refugees and is not happy about it. Pup, one of the citizens under rule of the Commander, is upset to one day find his brother missing. Thinking that it's the commander who took him, he confronts him and gets volunteered to be part of a special force. The force's job is to go into the fairy world also known as tir'na'nOg and steal something that will save them all. THE WHITE HORSE TRICK is a great book for people who like adventure and a little bit of action it's also filled with a good plot and. The author does a great job of putting together a magical story filled with cleverness and teamwork. Readers who like fantasy, adventure, action-type stories will enjoy reading this book. The reason I think the other made this book was to give the reader a glimpse of what fairy's and humans were like if out together, I also think she was trying to tell us how beautiful and how the weather was like in Ireland because in the book one of the main character JJ said "I'll nevcer forget the beautiful meadows this place used to have".

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 7, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Kira M for Teens Read Too

    In the near future, the world has been destroyed by climate changes. Life is almost impossible in Ireland. The topsoil, for the most part, has been washed away by torrential rain. Commander Aiden Liddy, last seen as a toddler in THE LAST OF THE HIGH KINGS, is now part of an elite governing army that has stockpiled the food and is in charge of distributing and controlling the population. His general, Donal, has an alternate agenda that might destroy both worlds as they know it. With T'ír na n'Óg unchanged, the king of the fairies has had an influx of refugees and is not happy about it. The only hope for the two worlds is something that lies within the fairy world. Pup, one of the citizens under rule of the tyrannical Commander, is upset to one day find his brother missing. Thinking that it's the commander who took him, he confronts him and gets "volunteered" to be part of a special force. The force's job is to go into the fairy world and steal something that will save them all. But how can Pup trust a man who may have kidnapped his brother? Will Aiden and Pup find a way to save both worlds? THE WHITE HORSE TRICK is a great fantasy adventure filled with a fast-paced plot and complex characters. Although the global warming issue seems a little heavy, the author does a great job of weaving together a magical story filled with cleverness and teamwork. Readers who like fantasy, adventure, action, fairies, and apocalyptic-type stories will enjoy reading this trilogy in order, beginning with THE NEW POLICEMAN.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)