White House Pet Detectives: Tales of Crime and Mysteryat the White House from a Pet's-Eye View

Overview

The tradition of pets in the White House goes all the way back to the Founding Fathers. From the parrot and foxhounds of George Washington to Spot and Barney, the current canines of the Bushes, the First Family's animal companions have always had a special place in America's heart.

These various (and often exotic) animals have enjoyed the special privileges of living in the nation's capital, giving them access to the scenes of power. So when ...

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Overview

The tradition of pets in the White House goes all the way back to the Founding Fathers. From the parrot and foxhounds of George Washington to Spot and Barney, the current canines of the Bushes, the First Family's animal companions have always had a special place in America's heart.

These various (and often exotic) animals have enjoyed the special privileges of living in the nation's capital, giving them access to the scenes of power. So when something goes awry in the White House, who better to solve it than these pet detectives

Did Rex, Ronald Reagan's King Charles spaniel, play a role in uncovering Irangate What mystery did Franklin Roosevelt's Scottish terrier, Fala, uncover when left on the Aleutian Islands How would some of the more unusual pets, such as John Quincy Adams's pet alligator or Calvin Coolidge hippopotamus, search for clues in the halls of the Executive Mansion

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
With twice as many presidential pets as presidents in the White House over the decades, why not give these beloved creatures dogs and cats, sure, but also bears, ponies, goats and alligators their own moment in the spotlight? In White House Pet Detectives: Tales of Crime and Mystery at the White House from a Pet's-Eye View, editor Carole Nelson Douglas gathers 14 head-scratchers and whodunits (all but one new), including Grand Master Edward D. Hoch's "Martha's Parrot," the story of a pet bird who witnesses a murder during George Washington's tenure, and Jan Grape's "Tabby Won't Tell," in which a young Tad Lincoln's trust in his cat helps his father discover a murder.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781581822434
  • Publisher: Turner Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 8/1/2002
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 858,426
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2012

    Funny and very interesting. Check it out

    Worth buying this book. I fund it very interesting and learned a great deal about the WhiteHouse that I didn,t know. An easy read, I have already given it to someone else to read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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