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White Lilacs
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White Lilacs

4.3 13
by Carolyn Meyer
 

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Young Rose Lee Jefferson is shocked to learn that the white residents of Dillon, Texas, want to raze the city’s black enclave, Freedomtown, and build a park in its place. Rose Lee and the other residents of Freedomtown cannot bear the thought of losing their homes. But fighting the city’s plans could be costly—or even life threatening. Will the

Overview

Young Rose Lee Jefferson is shocked to learn that the white residents of Dillon, Texas, want to raze the city’s black enclave, Freedomtown, and build a park in its place. Rose Lee and the other residents of Freedomtown cannot bear the thought of losing their homes. But fighting the city’s plans could be costly—or even life threatening. Will the families of Freedomtown be able to save their thriving community?
    
Includes a reader's guide.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Meyer's writing style is accessible and engaging, making this a good read or an easy curriculum connection to the multicultural mainstream."—Booklist
The ALAN Review - Michaeline Chance-Reay
Carolyn Meyer has taken a kernel of history and imagined a most moving elaboration and yet another memorable female protagonist. Rose Lee Jefferson draws each house in Freedomtown, including her grandfather's, which contains the extraordinary garden where the rare white lilacs grow, to create an illustrated historical record before the town is literally moved away. During the 1920s, the residents of Denton, Texas-the white, voting residents, that is-actually did move an African-American community to make room for a city park. The novel contrasts the lives of Rose Lee and her relatives with those of the white family for whom they work. This is a realistic portrayal of the precarious existence of African-Americans in the South and how their sense of community and faith helps them survive. Varying attitudes towards segregation are reflected in the actions of both segments of the town, and unlikely heroes emerge. Meyer gives us believable characters and a good story which will give middle school and high school readers a greater understanding of the human drama in American history.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152058517
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
01/01/2007
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
218,968
Product dimensions:
4.50(w) x 7.00(h) x 0.60(d)
Lexile:
990L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
"Meyer's writing style is accessible and engaging, making this a good read or an easy curriculum connection to the multicultural mainstream."—Booklist

Meet the Author

Carolyn Meyer  is the acclaimed author of more than fifty books for young people. Her many award-winning novels include Mary, Bloody Mary, an ABA Pick of the Lists, an NCSS-CBC Notable Children's Trade Book in the Field of Social Studies, and an ALA Best Book for Young Adults; Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess, a New York Times bestseller; White Lilacs, an ALA Best Book for Young Adults, an NYPL Best Book for the Teen Age, and an IRA Young Adults' Choice; and Marie, Dancing, a BookSense Pick. Ms. Meyer lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Visit her website at www.readcarolyn.com.

Customer Reviews

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White Lilacs 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Have you heard about the Civil Rights Movement? If you have, then you could make some connections between that and White Lilacs by Carolyn Meyer. White Lilacs is about a twelve year old African American girl, overhearing some white women discussing moving the blacks out of Freedomtown into a junky, gross-smelling place so the whites will have yet another park. Her friends, and her family, are being forced to leave Freedomtown, Texas by the white people of the town of Dillon, due to their race. The K.K.K. (or Ku Klux Klan) burn a cross in front of their church when they refuse to leave. Then they burn down the schoolhouse so they can't have school. The blacks are trying to fight back, but will it work? Will they be able to fight for what's right and get to stay where they have always lived? Or will they just give up and live their lives in misery?

Rose Lee is very brave. She is thoughtful, shy, loyal, and adventurous. She is a tall African American, has brown hair, and is only twelve years old when Poppa tells her to spy on the white people. Father to Rose Lee, Poppa, is very proud, serious, and loyal. He is a very tall and muscular man, and is very informational. He tells Rose Lee to spy on Mrs. Bell who happens to be the one woman he despises the most. She is causing the move of blacks from Freedomtown. Mrs. Bell is a very rich, stuck-up, snooty woman. Her blonde hair, blue eyes, and thin body are always up to no good. Momma, Grandpa Jim, Henry, Catherine Jane, and Aunt Tillie are just a few of the supporting characters, also fighting for their right to live in Freedomtown.

White Lilacs is an amazing book. I liked that I could read it with no problems, and it always kept me wondering what was going to happen next. I loved how all of the characters are different, have their own opinions, and their own talents. I liked how the words were very descriptive, and I could understand them. There aren't any huge twists, or remakes of other stories, so this one is unique. If I had to rate this book on a scale of one to ten, I would give it an eleven. It is a very good book and I recommend it to everyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought it was great! The friendships in the book were wonderful and so were the characters. There was a good plot too. I read this book and I would read it again and again.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved white lilacs. it had a great selection of words and it had a wonderful plot. I read it twice
Guest More than 1 year ago
It was a great book about african-americans and about there rights. This girl lives in the town Dilon and is about to have to move because whites want to make there town a park. It is about her life and what she has to go through.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i had to read this book for a book report this year in 9th grade. i really liked it. i dont like to read much because i dont follow what i am reading, but this book made sense and i followed it clearly. it made you think about how lucky you really are.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i read this when i was in 6th grade i luved it and i was just thinking about it and im gonna buy it and read it a million times more i have no clue y but i really thought this was a really good book i think im into the kinda stuff that is in it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. Although I am only in 8th grade, I had to read this book for school and totally fell in love with the charecters. I came to Barns & Noble.com because i was looking for books by the same author.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is very intersetng in the fact that it is about afro-americans from the past! I enjoy those types of books!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is really good for people that like to read about black history! If you have not read it yet, try it and join in on the magic!***** five stars!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Rose Lee's story of her life in and out of Freedomtown is one that clearly demonstrates the struggles of the African-Americans during the early 1900's. Rose Lee's love for her home, her town, her freedom is tainted by the fact that though slavery has ended, the whites are still in control of their lives. The author carefully weaves strong African figures into the story, as well as those who are too tired or too afraid to be strong themselves. Meyer also includes a few passionate, sympathetic whites who also show their strength in their support of equallity for ALL men. What I liked most is that the author was able to give the readers a real idea of the characters' strife, without resulting to graphic and frightening events. The readers are told enough to know the situation, but the story does not become grotesque.
Guest More than 1 year ago
it was a good book, very sad, but too true. it tells about doings of the kkk, and other segregation- related happeneings.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My English Class read this book as well as I, and White Lilacs just didn't bloom at all. Rose Lee is a character from Freedomtown. She and the other black people in the city trie to elude the people who want to tear Freedomtown down. The book starts out slow. The pace picks up faster towrds the middle, but is boring at the end.