The White Luck Warrior (Aspect-Emperor Series #2)

The White Luck Warrior (Aspect-Emperor Series #2)

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by R. Scott Bakker
     
 

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Widely praised by reviewers and a growing body of fans, R. Scott Bakker has already established his reputation as one of the few unique new talents in the fantasy genre. Now he returns with the long-awaited The White Luck Warrior—the second book in the Aspect-Emperor series.

As Anasurimbor Kellhus and his Great Ordeal march ever farther into the

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Overview

Widely praised by reviewers and a growing body of fans, R. Scott Bakker has already established his reputation as one of the few unique new talents in the fantasy genre. Now he returns with the long-awaited The White Luck Warrior—the second book in the Aspect-Emperor series.

As Anasurimbor Kellhus and his Great Ordeal march ever farther into the wastes of the Ancient North, Esmenet finds herself at war with not only the Gods, but her own family as well. Achamian, meanwhile, leads his own ragtag expedition to the legendary ruins of Sauglish, and to a truth he can scarcely survive, let alone comprehend. Into this tumult walks the White- Luck Warrior, assassin and messiah both.

The White Luck Warrior is a story filled with heartstopping action, devious treachery, grand passion, and meticulous detail. It is both a classic quest tale and a high fantasy war story.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Even fans of 2009's The Judging Eye who haven't reread it recently may be confused by the dense and complex infodump that opens this ponderous sequel. Those who persevere will be richly rewarded as the plot and characters are slowly refined. Mimara, stepdaughter of the Aspect-Emperor, outgrows revenge in favor of love; Achamian, former friend of (and cuckolded by) the emperor, undertakes a dangerous quest for truth; Cleric is a nonman whose drive to feel and remember twists attachment into terrible forms; Sorweel must decide whether to believe in the Aspect-Emperor's quest or kill him for the gods. The reader cannot tell heroes from villains, and neither can the heroes and villains themselves; all are sympathetic and horrific at once. A cliffhanger ending builds suspense for the final volume. (May)
Library Journal
Anasûrimbor Kelhus, the Aspect-Emperor, leads the Great Ordeal, an army of troops and hostage-kings, into the unknown wastes of the Ancient North while at home his queen, Esmenet, struggles with internal strife. An expedition to the ruins of Sauglish, in search of a lost city, brings Esmenet's daughter, Mimara, into possession of The Judging Eye, which allows her to see the good or evil in a person. Finally, the White Luck Warrior appears, a figure who is assassin as well as savior. The second volume in Bakker's series (The Judging Eye) brings more complications to an already complex tale of ambition, prophecy, love, and betrayal. VERDICT The author of "The Prince of Nothing" series (The Darkness That Comes Before; The Warrior-Prophet; The Thousandfold Thought) understands the art of crafting fantasy epics spiced with exotic trappings and should attract fans of epic fantasy.
Kirkus Reviews

By Crom and Ishtar, Batman: There's a minor epidemic of sword-and-sorcery epics out there, and now one of them is long-practicing fantasist Bakker's sequel toThe Judging Eye (2009).

As readers familiar with that book know—and if you haven't read the first volume, you'll need to—Anasûrimbor Kellhus is "the Aspect-Emperor of the Three Seas." His job description requires him to fight the forces of the Apocalypse here, the weirdlings of the frozen Ancient North there—in short, there's not much time for golf or a Hawaiian vacation in a place where the gods and one's kinfolk alike have it in for you. That world is a diverse if violent place: Think of it as Canada and Brazil with magic wands and battleaxes, with the North always coming in ahead, since "commerce with the Nonmen had allowed them to outstrip their more swarthy cousins to the South." More swarthy? Nonmen? Gulp. The shades of D.W. Griffith are fainter than those of J.R.R. Tolkien, of course, with whom comparisons are naturally to be drawn. And in that Bakker is found wanting, for though this volume is dauntingly big, not much happens in it—there's a lot of back story and a lot of talk, but not much of it adds up. Oh, there are grandmasters of the "Gnostic School of Sohonc," of course, and Anagogic Schools, and practitioners of Inrithism and victims of "the Inrithi persecution of sorcery"; there are brave warriors of something called the Great Ordeal, which is more descriptive than the author might have intended; there's a character who can "scry our scrying;" and there are witches and wizards but, at least, seedy brothels in the place of groaning-board inns. Not many of the venues are attractive; "the omnipresent smell of rot seemed to take on a sinister tang," says our narrator, which unfortunately speaks volumes.

It's the usual fantasy stuff, in other words, derivative of but much inferior to the Tolkien/Lewis/Peake schools of yore. Take it as good news or bad, but another volume in the series awaits.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590204641
Publisher:
The Overlook Press
Publication date:
04/14/2011
Series:
Aspect-Emperor Series, #2
Pages:
608
Product dimensions:
9.06(w) x 6.24(h) x 1.92(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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