White Rabbit's Color Book (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

White Rabbit's Color Book (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

4.1 9
by Alan Baker
     
 

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One inquisitive hop, and splash! goes White Rabbit into a bucket of yellowpaint. Soon the little rabbit is jumping from bucket to bucket and learning all about colors and how they mix. Quivering with excitement, Brown Rabbit nudges open a square gift box and finds five balloons which take on all sorts of shapes. Gray Rabbit and Black-and-White Rabbit have their own

Overview

One inquisitive hop, and splash! goes White Rabbit into a bucket of yellowpaint. Soon the little rabbit is jumping from bucket to bucket and learning all about colors and how they mix. Quivering with excitement, Brown Rabbit nudges open a square gift box and finds five balloons which take on all sorts of shapes. Gray Rabbit and Black-and-White Rabbit have their own adventures as they discover numbers and the alphabet. Toddlers will have fun and learn with these concept books, warmly illustrated with meticulous detail by Alan Baker.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Each of these innovative concept books adds an extra dimension to the usual lessons about letters, colors, shapes and numbers. ABC , like so many other alphabet books, starts out with an apple, but then departs from the expected: the familiar fruit becomes the subject of Black and White Rabbit's painting in a wry and often very messy journey from A to Z. 1,2,3 combines a counting lesson with animal identification (and more art) as Gray Rabbit molds piles of colored clay into a variety of figures. In Shape , Brown Rabbit investigates the contents of a brightly wrapped package. White Rabbit, in Color , shows off the mixable properties of the primary colors when she immerses herself in three big tubs of paint. Sweet-natured humor infuses the clear, precise artwork, and Baker's talented bunnies are as winsome as can be. Ages 6 mos.-3 yrs. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Mary Quattlebaum
Cuddly rabbits help youngsters learn about the world in a Kingfisher-published series by Alan Baker. White Rabbit's Color Book is especially enjoyable for its gentle humor and the surprises awaiting a curious bunny exploring tubs of yellow, red, and blue paint. Others in the series are Little Rabbits' First Word Book and Little Rabbit's Bedtime.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780613593830
Publisher:
Demco Media
Publication date:
07/01/2003
Edition description:
THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
Pages:
24
Sales rank:
748,100
Product dimensions:
9.25(w) x 7.75(h) x 0.25(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Alan Baker has illustrated The Odyssey and The Story of King Arthur, both published by Kingfisher. In addition, Alan created the popular and successful Little Rabbits series, which has sold over half-a-million copies in the U.S. Alan is a lecturer in illustration at the University of Brighton, England.

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White Rabbit's Color Book 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is just a simple and adorable. My 2 yo loves it and the simple teaching is great for him to follow. I LOVE the illustrations of the bunny. He's just precious. I'm getting more of Alan Baker's bunny books right now!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My friend's grandaugter enjoyed the book so much. She kept reading it.
mundago More than 1 year ago
I was excited to bring this book to story time,but when I opened it and read it I found it to be boring..I read it to the kids and they weren't really into it... the process that rabbit went through to explore the different colors I found to be confusing,I'd pass on this one not effective for learning about colors.
im-a-reader More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book to read to your children. The story is very simple so that toddlers can follow and has basic colors which the story has you mixing to make other colors. The pictures are big and memorable for little ones. It was a favorite for both my daughter and son, and I purchased it for my niece who just had her first baby.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My 3 year old daughter and I love White Rabbit's Color Book. She loves to see rabbit jump into the different pots of color, only to rinse herself off to try other colors. This book also introduces toddlers to the concept colors that are created when primary colors are mixed together. My daughter is biracial, and when white rabbit ends up as a happy brown rabbit at the end of the story, she laughs and says that rabbit is brown just like her.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book that teaches about colors in a very fun way. We received this book as a gift and now plan to purchase more to give as gifts. We also like Little Rabbit's Shape book and Number book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My son loves this book it recently got destroyed because he read it so much and carried it everywhere. I have to replace it since it's his favorite!He is not even 2 yet so I do wish it were a board book though.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is one of my child's favorites. Rabbit explores the world of primary colors by jumping into different tubs of paint, washes off and then trys another color. Eventually Rabbit mixes colors making green, orange and purple. The vivid colors, and curious way of Rabbit makes this book a family treasure. We absolutely love it. I even gave it as Easter gifts to several children. I highly recommend it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My daughter brought this book home for her first grade reading assignment. The story goes like this: a white rabbit jumps from color pot to color pot and changes colors, in the end choosing to use ALL the colors and remain the BEST color there is, which is brown. Two problems: one, all the primary colors do not add up to brown...try it yourself by mixing food coloring. It's a muddy grey. Two, the message here is, 'Rabbit's original color wasn't good enough!' Aren't we trying to get away from this kind of thinking?