White Supremacy and Black Resistance in Pre-industrial South Africa: The Making of the Colonial Order in the Eastern Cape, 1770-1865

White Supremacy and Black Resistance in Pre-industrial South Africa: The Making of the Colonial Order in the Eastern Cape, 1770-1865

by Clifton C. Crais
     
 
This book provides an innovative and in-depth analysis of the emergence of a racially divided society in pre-industrial Southern Africa. It centers on an exploration of the past of the Eastern Cape, a region of decisive importance in Southern African history. Colonial land and labor policies that had their origin in the Eastern Cape spread into much of British

Overview

This book provides an innovative and in-depth analysis of the emergence of a racially divided society in pre-industrial Southern Africa. It centers on an exploration of the past of the Eastern Cape, a region of decisive importance in Southern African history. Colonial land and labor policies that had their origin in the Eastern Cape spread into much of British Southern and Eastern Africa and as far away as the White Highlands of Kenya. In the modern era the Eastern Cape has been the cradle of African nationalism in South Africa. Clifton Crais moves beyond the liberal and Marxist approaches that have dominated South African history by bringing questions of culture to the center of his analysis.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Offering a somewhat fresh perspective...successfully deconstructs several racist underpinnings of South African history and presents some unique and progressive theories." International Journal of African Historical Studies

"Crais adds many fresh insights...In particular, he illuminates the changing goals and perceptions of the diverse participants in the process that resulted in the conquest of the African peoples in the region...and their incorporation in a colonial state dominated by white settlers." American Historical Review

"Crais's well-written book is the best cross-cultural study ever done for the eastern Cape region of South Africa....Crais's thesis is controversial, revisionist, and highly intelligent. A must read for all serious students of the area." J.E. Flint, Choice

"For South African studies trapped in a bland conceptual discourse which limits historical questions to issues of race, class, and gender, Crais' book is most refreshing. It is brave in its exploration of silences through a hermeneutical reading of seemingly ordinary events and quotidian gestures, and in its analysis of 'obvious' daily practice and personal relations under colonialism." Shamil Jeppie, Journal of Interdisciplinary History

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521404792
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
01/09/1992
Series:
African Studies Series, #72
Pages:
284
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 1.06(d)

Meet the Author

Clifton Crais is Professor of History and Director of the Institute of African Studies at Emory University. He is author of over one hundred works, including Poverty, War, and Violence in South Africa(Cambridge University Press, 2011); Sara Baartman and the Hottentot Venus: A Ghost Story and a Biography (2008) - on the woman more famously known as the 'Hottentot Venus' and the subject of a feature film, 'Venus Noire' - and The Politics of Evil: Magic, Power and the Political Imagination in South Africa (Cambridge University Press, 2002). He is also editor of The Culture of Power in Southern Africa: Essays on State Formation and the Political Imagination (2003), co-editor of Breaking the Chains: Slavery and its Legacy in Nineteenth-Century South Africa (1995) and Area Editor of the Encyclopedia of World History, (8 volumes, 2008). Crais is nearing completion of History Lessons, a work that combines memoir, historiography and the neuroscience of memory and a documentary history of South Africa. Long-range works include a history of violence and explorations of fiction and creative non-fiction concerning memory and narrative.

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