The Whites of Their Eyes: Bunker Hill, the First American Army, and the Emergence of George Washington [NOOK Book]

Overview

Paul Lockhart combines military and political history to offer a major reassessment of one of the most famous battles in American history.

One hot June afternoon in 1775, on the gentle slopes of a hill near Boston, Massachusetts, a small band of ordinary Americans—frightened but fiercely determined—dared to stand up to a superior British force. The clash would be immortalized as the Battle of Bunker Hill: the first real engagement of the American Revolution and one of the most ...

See more details below
The Whites of Their Eyes: Bunker Hill, the First American Army, and the Emergence of George Washington

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price

Overview

Paul Lockhart combines military and political history to offer a major reassessment of one of the most famous battles in American history.

One hot June afternoon in 1775, on the gentle slopes of a hill near Boston, Massachusetts, a small band of ordinary Americans—frightened but fiercely determined—dared to stand up to a superior British force. The clash would be immortalized as the Battle of Bunker Hill: the first real engagement of the American Revolution and one of the most famous battles in our history.But Bunker Hill was not the battle that we have been taught to believe it was.

Revisiting old evidence and drawing on new research, historian Paul Lockhart, author of The Drillmaster of Valley Forge, shows that Bunker Hill was a clumsy engagement pitting one inexperienced army against another. Lockhart tells the rest of the story, too: how a mob of armed civilians became America's first army; how George Washington set aside his comfortable patrician life to take command of the veterans of Bunker Hill; and how the forgotten heroes of 1775—though overshadowed by themore famous Founding Fathers—kept the notion of American liberty alive, and thus made independence possible.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062091796
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 6/7/2011
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 659,703
  • File size: 61 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Paul Lockhart is a professor of history at Wright State University, where he teaches European and military history. He lives in Dayton, Ohio.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 13 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 15, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    a fresh interpretation of the beginning of the Revolution

    The shift of 13 loyal crown colonies, to the independent United States is subtle, because it happens over the better part of the decade, Yet when it happened, particularly in New England, where the descendants of many of the old Roundheads from the Civil War of a century before reside; it happened with a deliberate violence that stunned the Empire in its organization and intent. The turn of the colonial resistance from petition, to protest to armed resistance precedes this story. The rise of the First American Army, and its really amateur siege of the British Army in Boston, throughout 1775, is the subject of this book.

    Lockhart, a professor of European and military history at Wright State University, brings his professional experience to primarily examining the organization and action of the First American Army in comparison and contrast to the British Army. He brings a fresh perspective on the primary sources relating to that military conflict in the Boston area in 1775. What he has done, besides telling afresh the story of that early resistance, is to show how many popular ideas, like the experience of the British army, and the reliability of the New England militia, are largely overstated and not really demonstrated by the military facts of those moments.

    This book focuses on the leadership of the two militaries and the many challenges they both faced. The military stories of the leadership is well told. Lockhart is sympathetic to both, and freely shows the shortcomings of both sides. His irony argument is that the leadership of the colonial militia had more experience fighting for the Crown than did rank and file members of the British Army they were facing, yet both corps of enlisted men were both raw and inexperienced.

    The sense of place, the physical environment of the land around Boston harbor is well told here, precisely because it is so important to understanding the decisions and reactions of both militaries. The political decisions, removed away in Philadelphia and London, are only at the periphery of this work, for they both were only spectators, particularly to decisions regarding Bunker Hill. Though Lockhart does show effectively how the conflict around the harbor in 1775 hardened the political leadership of both sides to pursue the conflict towards its end of either total rebellion suppression (like in Ireland in the 1790's) or towards independence. The book ends with the establishment and attempt of military professionalism, through Washington and leadership from the Continental Congress, not from voluntary New England committees.

    As a popular work of military history, Lockhart writes a good narrative, and explains well the military tactics and terminology of the 18th century well enough. The general reader should enjoy the story, and the examination of human nature through the many characters of the battle. The book could have used more descriptions of the views of the junior officers and senior enlisted men of the British Army, though I realize that those are harder to come by. Nevertheless, this is an enjoyable read that brings new light to the conflict.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2012

    Great read on the flight home from Boston

    I had a long flight home after my first trip to Boston. The day before, the wife and I had walked the Freedom Trail, culminating at a stop at the Bunker Hill monument and museum. This first great battle of the American Revolution (not to discount the efforts at Lexington and Concord) set the tone for the Revolution. After this, there would be no going back, nowhere to go but forward in the fight against Great Britain.
    This book details briefly the events in Boston 1775 leading up to the battle and then the battle itself. The major players are brought to the forefront and the reader is left with a clear understanding of how the battle unfolded and the remarkable efforts of the rebels to build and then defend the redoubt just hours later.
    For those looking for more information on this pyrrhic British victory, look no further.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 7, 2011

    awesome

    One of the best history books I've read and I've read alot,was very worth the 15 dollars.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2014

    This is one of the best books on Bunker Hill I've ever read.  I

    This is one of the best books on Bunker Hill I've ever read.  I details the story of the American army nearly from conception.  The majority of Paul Lockhart's sources come from correspondence.  It is a must-have for any person interested in the American War of Independence.  

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2013

    Starlightshimmer

    Starlightshimmer is locked out!!!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2013

    Brambletalon

    We are moving main camp to result two

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2013

    CS

    "Good catch." She purred. ~€

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)